Tag Archives: blue owl

Gilded Reverie Lenormand

May We Introduce Mlle. Lenormand

003bWith the Lenormand decks growing in popularity, we wanted to share a bit about the woman this system is named for and her original deck.

Marie Anne Adelaide Lenormand was born in 1772. Her date of birth, May 27, puts her in the Gemini house. She was orphaned very early in her life so she was sent to a convent to receive her education. It is said that she left there at the age of 14 to head to Paris.

Blue Owl Lenornmand

Blue Owl Lenormand

Per her own writing, Mademoiselle Lenormand read

her cards for many important people including Tsar Alexander 1. The Empress Josephine was arguably her most famous client but she also read for Robespierre and other French revolutionaries such as Marat. It is an interesting thing to think about, isn’t it?

If she read for those revolutionaries as well as French nobility, could she have been setting both sides against one another? Purely speculation on this writer’s part, of course, but it is fun to consider.

Under the Roses Lenormand

Under the Roses Lenormand

There are many references to her readings and predictions. It is said that she told Bonaparte that he would meet a widow who would make him happy. She also advised that he would, “achieve a very high rank by his influence; but that ye be ungrateful to it” thus losing any happiness he might find. I think we all know how that one turned out.

At the age of 42, she began writing. Some of her literary works ended her up in prison a few times. Madame Lenormand never spent too much time in jail though. It seems our card reader was a bit of a rabble rouser. Her death came at less than a month after her seventy first birthday in 1843.

Gilded Reverie Lenormand

Gilded Reverie Lenormand

A misconception is that Mlle. Lenormand created the Lenormand deck. That is not correct. She popularized the reading of cards. Card reading was fairly common but generally done by the travelers or Romany people. The term gypsy is offensive to many in that populace so we will not use that here. Mlle. Lenormand did say that her first pack of cards was given to her at the age of fourteen by that group. It would be intriguing to go back to that time to discover if getting that deck of cards was what precipitated her leaving the convent to head into the grand city of Paris.

A deck created by Madame Breteau was named “Le Grand Jeu de Mlle. Lenormand” in honor of Lenormand after her death. This Madame Breteau claimed to be a student of Mlle. Lenormand. The deck was the fifty-four card version. Another deck was also published around the same time called the “Petit Lenormand.”

Mystical Lenormand

Mystical Lenormand

That 36 card deck is the one that is most popular now. German in origin, it is said to be based on the “Game of Hope” card game, which is based on a board game where you raced around the board based on cards drawn. Similar games would be Candyland in today’s world. I can only hope that one hundred years from now we do not have a Candyland oracle.

So from 18th and 19th century Paris, a young orphan girl still shines. Do you think she knew her legacy would stretch so far into the future? I like to think that she did.

We are celebrating our Lenormand line today. Which of the four decks featured here appeal to you the most? One commenter will win their choice of these four Lenormand decks.

Comments must be entered by Friday June 20 no later than 12 midnight PST.

Winner announced on this blog Tuesday June 24, 2014.

 

Cards shown:

Blue Owl Lenormand (rhymes written by Stuart Kaplan)
Gilded Reverie Lenormand
Under The Roses Lenormand
Mystical Lenormand

ANNOUNCEMENT: Mlle Lenormand Blue Owl Deck

Blueowl_box There are Tarot decks. There are Oracle decks. Then there are the Lenormand cards. Although you can find many versions of this cartomancy system, the one touted as the top seller is the Mlle Lenormand Blue Owl. It was published in the 1920's.

An interesting fact about the Lenormand cards is that the first deck was actually published after Mademoiselle Marie Anne Adelaide Lenormand (Alençon, 27 May 1772 – Paris, 25 June 1843), aka Mlle Lenormand, died. It is said that she read for more than 40 years. By her own accounting, she read for Robespierre, the Empress Josephine and even Czar Alexander among others. She lived through the French revolution. She did see some prison time but only short terms.

Though this is a French deck, the country where it is the most popular is Germany. Mlle Lenormand claimed that she got her first deck of cards from Gypsies when she was a young girl. She designed her own 36 card deck and those images still grace many of the Lenormand decks.

This Blue Owl version is one you want to own if you are a Lenormand aficionado. And even if you aren't, try your hand at this intriguing system. The meanings of each card change by where they are in relationship to the person card that is being read for. Many Tarot enthusiasts study this system as a companion to Tarot.

Mary K. Greer shares a bit about Madame le Normand and the cards here. Liz Hazel did an astrological chart for Mlle Lenormand that is fascinating. You can see that in the comments on MKG's blog. We here at U.S. Games Systems, Inc. are delighted to announce that you can now get this famous little deck.

Mlle Lenormand Blue Owl deck is the English language version of the famous fortune-telling deck used by Mlle Lenormand.

The 36-card deck is packaged in the traditional tuck box with its original Blue Owl design. The pack includes a small instruction booklet with a brief explanation of each key card and sample readings.

In a reading, meanings are determined by the relationships between cards in a spread, as well as by individual cards.

Mlle Lenormand rose from humble beginnings in 19th century France to become the most prominent fortune teller in Europe. Her clients included Napoleon, about whom she made bold and astonishingly accurate predictions.

Her card-reading methods are still popular today.

Are you a Mlle. Lenormand fan? Want to become one? Check out the Mlle Lenormand Blue Owl deck at your local retailer. If they don't have it, send them to U.S. Games Systems, Inc. Here are a few images.

Blueowl1 Blueowl3
Blueowl8 Blueowl12
Blueowl17 Blueowl27
Blueowl_back

 

If you like online oracles, check this Lenormand one out.

© April 2011 U.S. Games Systems Inc.