REPOST: Resurrection and Rebirth

We wanted to share this terrific use of the Art of Life Tarot. This pieces was originally posted March 20th, 2014 by Joy Vernon of Completely Joyous.

Thank you, Joy, for featuring the Art of Life Tarot. This deck was a Coalition of Visionary Resources (COVR) Award Finalist 2013. We are very proud to offer this unique deck.

Now enjoy Joy’s post.

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Welcome to the Tarot Blog Hop!

An international group of tarotists (check out the master list) are all writing on the same topic and then linking to each other so that the reader can hop from one blog to the next, seeing all the permutations and facets that the topic inspired in different writers.

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Resurrection and Rebirth

ArtofLife_13Death

Death from the Art of Life Tarot

I just finished the beginning tarot class that I teach once or twice a year. On the last day I usually have time set aside for students to do readings for each other (as we do in one or two other classes). But this group was insistent that they would get more out of seeing me do a reading. I was hesitant—I thought it was a faulty argument, in that practice is the only way to increase one’s skill. But they wanted to see my techniques in action. I finally said that I would, but only if they could provide me a deck I hadn’t used before—otherwise it would be too likely that I would not be using the skills from the beginning class but using built up associations from my familiarity with the cards. One student reached into her bag and pulled out an Art of Life Tarot. It’s one I haven’t read with, so I finally consented.

I taught them my favorite 7-card spread, the Split Hexagram, which I originally learned from Modern Magick by Donald Michael Kraig (RIP, 1951-2014).

We decided to do a general reading on how the students as a group would progress with their tarot studies. I’d like to share the reading with you.

Reading for Magician’s Tools Tarot Basics Class
Sunday, March 16, 2014
Split Hexagram Spread
Art of Life Tarot Deck

Question: How will the students in this group progress with their tarot studies?

Card 1. Spiritual Influence
9 of Pentacles

The 9 of Pentacles in the AoL deck shows a man in a black Edwardian tailcoat and black top hat standing on a balcony under a red and white striped canopy looking over the green leafy treetops of the boulevard below him while a long row of attached houses or apartments curves into the distance. There is a sense of solitude and nature in the midst of a crowded city.

This card wasn’t saying much to me as I started the reading for the group— it came to life when I moved to the second card and compared the two—which ironically is one of my teaching points: the cards are meaningless out of context, which has to be built through their relationship to the question, the querent, the spread positions, and the surrounding cards.

Card 2, Spiritual Influence (stronger)
The Star

The Star is portrayed by The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh. In stark contrast to the impressionist piece preceding it, this work seemed to embody more of the psychic energy of tarot reading with its swirling, heavy strokes and sharp contrasts of dark, inky blues with the bright yellows of the stars and moon. I felt that the black suit of the man in the first card, in some ways out of place in the otherwise bright card, was tied in to the darker colors of van Gogh’s nighttime scene. This led me to say that the intuition represented by the moon in the card and the spirituality represented by the church steeple were what was going on inside the man in the previous picture. Externally, he was alone looking out over the city, internally he was experiencing the heightened psychic energy of a deep spiritual connection.

Card 3, Spiritual Advice
Queen of Cups

Breakfast in Bed by Mary Cassatt

The Queen of Cups in the AoL Tarot is illustrated by Breakfast in Bed by Mary Cassatt. The image is of a woman lying in bed, her arms around a child sitting on the edge of the bed. The white of the bedclothes, her white nightgown, and the child’s white garments contrasted with the darkness of the previous card. The child, I thought, represented those who couldn’t understand what we were doing but who supported us anyway.

Putting the three cards together now, I said that the Spiritual Advice represented here in this card was to be able to easily move back and forth between a state of awareness of conscious reality, shown by the man on the balcony overlooking the boulevard, and the state of deep intuition, represented by The Starry Night. Just as one experiences the transition between the dreaming state and the waking state every day as we wake up, we needed to learn to consciously integrate the two states such that we could inhabit both at the same time.

Card 4, Material Influence
Knight of Pentacles

The Knight of Pentacles shows a woman rehearsing on the violin, a stand with sheet music in front her, a couch strewn with books and perhaps more music behind her. The reds and browns in the card combined with the creativity of the music made me want to lean towards a more fiery interpretation, but I could see that clearly she was not performing but practicing, and ongoing dedication and commitment to a craft is a very earthy, Pentacles thing. To me, the card represented practice with an intention to eventually perform.

Card 5, Material Influence (stronger)
Page of Wands

The Page of Wands threw me off because the child was shown with a sword. A boy sits on a stone bench in a courtyard, holding a sword haphazardly in front of him, point to the ground, while a bearded man sits next to him. The child and man look at each other, perhaps the bearded man is instructing the boy.

What I liked about the combination of the material influences was that solitary practice was shown first, then instruction shown second. I told my students that the recommendation here was to work on their own, practicing their current skills, and then when they felt accomplished in their work, to move on to additional instruction. I think there is often a tendency to jump from one class to the next without fully integrating the experiences and knowledge of the first.

Card 6, Material Advice
Death

It’s always helpful when a difficult card comes up in class and we can address it!

Death and Life by Gustav Klimt

Death here is illustrated with Death and Life by Gustav Klimt. The figure of skeletal Death, draped in blues and purples, covered in Latin crosses, swaying and hunched, clutching a short wooden club to his chest with his white, bone fingers, stands separate from but looking over toward bodies of men, women and children, entwined and embracing, forming an amorphous mass. Although the figures are mostly nude, bright, colorful swatches of fabric with printed geometric designs swathe and shroud them.

Following as it does our two cards that represent practicing and gaining instruction, I read in this card that the students are the figure of Death itself—they lose the amalgamation of the colorful variety of their different teachers and influences and come into their own distinctiveness and uniqueness, intuitive and spiritually based, in alignment with the color and religious symbolism of the Star card.

Card 7, Final Outcome
7 of Pentacles

This final card utilizes a detail from The Empress of China Culling Mulberry Leaves by Bernhard Rode. We laughed at the ridiculousness to our minds of the Empress needing her entire entourage to accomplish a task that the average peasant could easily do alone. I talked about the ways in which we use our techniques like servants to support us, just as one servant lowered the branch, one held the bowl to receive the leaves, and one held a parasol to shade the sun.

Then I noticed the words on the card. I try my best to avoid words and interpretive card titles, and had successfully up to this point not noticed any of the other quotes offered in the lower part of each card. But this one caught my eye, and turned out to be educational—I did not know the meaning of the Mulberry tree in the image. The quote is a Chinese proverb: “With time and patience the mulberry leaf becomes a silk gown.” I now understood that the Empress in the painting was harvesting silk worms and their cocoons from the tree.

moth and silk wormYears ago during a Denver Tarot Meetup event, down in the basement of Gypsy House Café, Jordan Hoggard told us all that when a caterpillar encases itself in the cocoon, it actually dissolves completely and the butterfly is created out of the primordial ooze of this dissolution. The silk worm, if left alone and not turned into a silk gown, will transform into a beautiful moth. (One of my students Googled it for me during class.)

As a final outcome, this certainly played nicely off the preceding Death card. Like the Empress shown in the image, they would be supported by the skills and techniques they had learned. But each student would go through a complete dissolution to become their own totally unique reader, like the silk worm transforming in its chrysalis.

I think of rebirth as beginning a new cycle: second verse, same as the first. These cycles are on the same plane, like tracing a circle over and over again. Cards that I use to represent new cycles can include the Wheel of Fortune, Death, the Moon and the Sun. I think of resurrection as moving to whole new level, from the ephemeral to the eternal, from the mortal to the immortal. This is a spiral, pushing off from and moving up and away from lower planes into new levels, like climbing a spiral staircase. I usually associate this idea with cards such as the Fool, the Tower, Judgment, or perhaps Temperance under certain conditions. An example of rebirth would be a seed that holds the complex code that perfectly recreates what is was before. Resurrection does not recreate what went before, but transforms utterly to something completely new.

To me, this reading spoke to the students of undergoing a resurrection of their tarot abilities, dissolving into the slime of death, and utterly transforming into their own unique and beautiful tarot selves.

Tarot Blog Hop: Ostara 2014

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Welcome to the USGames Tarot blog. We love participating in this gathering of Tarot and oracle blogs. It’s always a mystery to see where the blog will go.

Our Tarot Blog Hop mistress for this round is Joanne Sprott. She’s asked us to focus on the resurrection of life, love, dreams, creation (and flowers!). We couldn’t think of anything better than to share some of forthcoming Chrysalis Tarot with you.

This gorgeous deck is from Holly Sierra and Toney Brooks who have put their considerable talents together to create a new, holistic approach to the Tarot.

Enjoy their creativity!

dsm060956 [Converted]CRS-78-card 9 stones CRS-78-card 8 spirals CRS-78-card 5 scrolls CRS-78-card 2 mirrors  CRS-78-Magician CRS-78-card MerlinCRS-78 CRS-78-card back

Now hop to the next post in our Ostara 2014 Tarot Blog Hop. Thanks for leaving a comment. We love hearing what you think of this new deck of ours.

The Chrysalis Tarot should emerge soon so do check back. And join us on Facebook where we post cards and questions so you can join in the fun!

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Tarot Comparisons: Ace of Coins

Let’s take a look at the Ace of Wands. Traditionally this card is read as the start of a business project when upright and a poor time to start a business or change jobs when reversed.

The way we interpret a card can change based on the art of the card itself. Compare the following Ace of Coins:

Morgan Greer Ace of Pentacles

Morgan Greer

Joie de Vivre Ace of Coins

 

Karma Ace of Coins

Karma Tarot

Haindl Ace Stones in the West

Haindl

How does the message of business and money beginnings get changed or enhanced in the four cards.

Leave your thoughts in the comments. What are your experiences with the Ace of Coins in your own readings? Thanks.

Decks Used:
1. Morgan Greer Tarot
2. Joie de Vivre Tarot
3. Karma Tarot
4. Haindl Tarot

Interview: Patrick Valenza

DeviantMoonBorderless_14Wands***LEAVE A COMMENT AND BE IN A DRAWING TO WIN YOUR OWN COPY OF THE DEVIANT MOON TAROT BORDERLESS EDITION***

Please help us welcome Patrick Valenza creator of the Deviant Moon Tarot, the borderless Deviant Moon Tarot and the Deviant Moon book. Interviewed here by Arwen Lynch, he shares thoughts on both versions of the Deviant Moon as well as his Deviant Moon book and his process.

Patrick says, “One of the best parts of creating the deck was “hunting” for specific textures as I respectfully tiptoed around the graveyards of eastern Long Island, N.Y. Background buildings were created with photographs I took from a local abandoned insane asylum. Rotted doors, windows and walls became castles, factories and cities.”

Arwen Lynch: Who or what first interested you in the tarot or in oracle cards?DeviantMoonBorderless_0Fool
Patrick Valenza: I discovered the tarot when I was about eight or nine years old back in 1975. The images fascinated my young mind and I studied them intently. While most of my friends copied drawings of Batman or Superman, I was busy designing the Fool and the Magician along the margins of my schoolwork.

AL: What is your favorite card in the deck?
PV: My favorite cards tend to be the darker ones, such as Death, the Devil and the Tower. My least favorite has always been the Hierophant.

DeviantMoonBorderless_5HierophantArwen Lynch: What was the first deck that truly inspired you?
PV: The first deck that inspired me as a child was the 1JJ Swiss deck as well as the Rider-Waite. When I became a teenager, I discovered images of the Visconti-Sforza Tarot, which inspired me to try and create my own hand-painted deck. The hand-painted deck I made in my adolescence later became the Deviant Moon when I reached middle age.

 

 

 

 

AL: What card in the Deviant Moon was the most challenge to paint?
PV: The most challenging aspect of the deck was trying to create custom gold coins for the Suit of Coins out of clay, which I then photographed and put into the art. So difficult, in fact, that I scrapped them and changed the suit to Pentacles after I had already submitted all the artwork to U.S. Games Systems for final publication. The coins just ruined the deck, however I may try them again in a future tarot project.

DeviantMoonBorderless_5Pentacles

AL: What lessons did you learn along the way?
PV: I learned a great deal of technical skills during the deck’s creation, such as Photoshop and digital photography. Up until the Deviant Moon, I was mainly a draftsman working in colored pencil.

AL: What card was the most challenging to write about for the upcoming companion book?
PV: Writing for the companion book was the most challenging project I ever worked on. I created the artwork for the Deviant Moon subconsciously. Writing about it made me stop and analyze the aftermath of it all. The book took almost three years to write. At times, I would spend days trying to find the right words for a simple paragraph. It was quite an accomplishment for me to finish it and my reward came when I hand delivered it to the good folks at U.S. Games Systems last spring.

DeviantMoonBorderless_2HighPriestessAL: How do you deal with creative block issues? Do you have any suggestions for those reading this?
PV: When I get creative blocks, I get out of my own way and let my unconscious mind take control. This is the part that connects best to my Muse. I just keep working until I get it. I usually figure out an artistic problem when I am waiting on line at a supermarket, driving, in the shower, or doing other mundane things that have nothing to do with my projects.

AL: What has been your greatest joy about the launch of your borderless deck?
PV: The borderless Deviant Moon came out over five years after the original. To me, it seems as if it is an entirely different deck and has its own personality. I am thrilled to see that so many feel the same way.

AL: What surprised you the most about creating your deck?
PV: The greatest surprise was how the deck connected me to so many people around the world. I love to hear from folks who say they were inspired in some way by the Deviant Moon.

AL: Name three people who are personal inspirations in the tarot or oracle world?DeviantMoonBorderless_11Cups
PV: Without question, Stuart Kaplan was my greatest tarot inspiration. When I discovered my first tarot deck as a boy, I was curious to know where these amazing cards came from, so I looked on the back of the box and saw his name. I used to think he was a wizard of same kind!
I also admire Paulina Cassidy for her magical illustrative style, as well as Lisa Hunt for her wonderful artistry and work ethic.

AL: Who are your favorite artists?
PV: My favorite style of art comes from pioneering animators such as Max Fleischer and Winsor McCay. I also admire all the unknown medieval woodblock cutters who created early tarot decks. Other favorites are Joan Miro, Max Ernst and Picasso.

AL: What do you do in your leisure time?
PV: In my leisure time I enjoy working on my creations. Luckily for me, work and play are the same.

AL: What is one piece of advice you would offer someone who wanted to create his or her own deck?
DeviantMoonBorderless_2SwordsPV: My advice would be to love it or leave it. You need to put your entire soul into an undertaking such as this for many, many years without expecting any reward in return. There are a zillion decks out there already. Make yours unique! Give it everything you’ve got!

AL: What does the future look like from your side of the computer?
PV: Right now I am working on three different decks at the same time, as well as a children’s book that I want to finish. The Deviant Moon has a sister deck, which I hope to submit for publication very soon.

Visit Patrick’s Deviant Moon site to learn more about his process and projects.

***LEAVE A COMMENT AND BE IN A DRAWING TO WIN YOUR OWN COPY OF THE DEVIANT MOON TAROT BORDERLESS EDITION***

Office Oracle: Paula Palmer

We love what we do here at USGames. It changes all the time plus we get to meet the most interesting people. So we wanted to return the favor and let you meet some of us. Here is our third Office Oracle featuring, Paula. She’s the mad scient…errr,Creative Director.

Stella asked: What’s the best thing about your job?

Paula answered: As Creative Director, I am fortunate to work with some amazingly talented people. Our artists and authors are so creative and passionate and they really inspire us to put out the best possible products we can. I love that USGS is a small company and allows us to be that way. We’re truly a family here and support each other, which I hope our artists and authors experience working with us.

Stella: What’s your favorite U.S. Games product?

Heartswitch_WitchClubPaula: That’s is not a fair question! On the games side, I’d have to go with Wizard or HeartSwitch even though I lose if I’m playing with my husband. On the tarot side, way too many to chose from. I’d have to go with Joie de Vivre, Ghosts and Spirits, and Deviant Moon (the borderless one is so cool!). Wait! Old English, too! and Pixie’s set! and a new surreal one that’s not out yet… UGH! See!?

Stella: What’s one thing you like to do when you are not at work?

Paula: Again with the hard choices! I’m indecisive so here are two: I love photography and try to shoot as often as I can, especially interesting textures and unusual points of view. I love to cook/bake as well and cupcakes are my favorite thing to make. Feeding friends and family makes me happy although I get nervous that someone may not like what I’ve made!

Stella: If you were a Tarot card, which one would you be?DeviantMoon_2HighPriestess

Paula: Hmm… all signs point to the High Priestess. I will take a secret to the grave with me; always try to follow my instincts and often regret when I don’t; and I always play devil’s advocate and try and point out all sides of an issue when there are decisions to be made.

Stella: What’s your favorite music?

Paula: Anything that moves me in some capacity. Whether it be toe-tapping blues or jazz, head-banging hard rock, or tear-inducing soul or classical music, if it causes me to react, I’ll love it. It’s amazing the effect music has over me and my crazy playlists often raise eyebrows!

2014 Imbolc Tarot Blog Hop: Increasing Creativity

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U.S. Games is happy to be joining in another round of the Tarot Blog Hop. Our wrangler for this round is Tarot Grandmaster Christiana Gaudet. She challenged our group to write about “Tarot, Healing and Creativity.”

In Paulina Cassidy’s newest deck (not Tarot), she offers up the idea of choosing two to three of her Witchlings to combine their energy. We offer up this spread to increase your creativity. We chose three Witchlings to serve as the positions of our Tarot spread. You are invited to share what cards you draw and anything you might like to share. There’s even a contest for you.

Spread for Increasing Creativity

    • Meditation,Witchlings by Paulina CassidyMeditation: The Witchling is Jasmine.

      Meditation is not just a journey
      But a shedding of worry and stress.
      Jasmine attunes her mind often
      To keep herself safe from distress.

      This spot will show you what type of meditation might benefit you most in terms of your creative processes. Some find chanting the most relaxing while others prefer to zone out to music. Maybe you are a walking meditation type. See what your cards tell you here.


    • Wish, Witchlings by Paulina CassidyWish: Orchid is the Witchling for this card.

      Orchid wished for happiness
      And then after a short while
      Her rain turned sunny
      Leaving her face with a smile.

      The second Witchling brings you the message of wishing. Creativity is fostered and fed by imagination. What better way to open up our creative channels than with a wish. Draw a card and see where your wishes can take you.


  • Relaxation, Witchlings by Paulina CassidyRelaxation: Petunia is our third and final Witchling.

    Like a river, Petunia flows
    So relaxed to end her day.
    Her mind melds into her spirit
    And with her body, drifts away.

    Our lovely third Witchling suggest that relaxation is the third way to increase your creativity. Sometimes, the brain just needs an out, right? So what card falls here can suggest some ways to relax and just let go.


    Why don’t you draw three cards from your nearest deck now? Share what they are for the positions of Meditation, of Wish and of Relaxation. One comment will be chosen to win their own Witchlings deck.

    Get extra entries for sharing this post on Facebook or Twitter or Google+ or Tumblr. Just leave the link in an additional comment. Good luck.

P.S. Click on the images to view them in a larger format.

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2013 Yule Tarot Blog Hop

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CrystalVisions_14SwordsWelcome to the Yule Blog Hop. The theme our hostess/wrangler has proposed is “Turning Darkness Into Light”. You can find the blog post before us or after us or the Master list in the links at the top or bottom of this post.

One of the uses of Tarot is to guide people towards light–in a way. If you consider that they are in pain or are scared, then the Tarot can be seen as a path of light. For today’s post, we’ve created a Tarot spread for you. Standing At The Crossroads puts you in the center and offers you four choices. Rather than telling you which one is the right path, or, if you will pardon the pun, the Light path, this spread shows you four options. You get to choose where you want to be.

Crystal_StarCrossroads Spread

A five card spread.
crossroads_spread

1. This card represents you and what is going on with you right now.
2. This card represents Path One.
3. This card represents Path Two.
4. This card represents Path Three.
5. This card represents path Four.

Each card is a potential. If you get the Tower in one, you might be challenged to think of what must come down for you to walk that path.

Please share with us if you do this spread. Feel free to use it on your own blog with a link back to this post. And link your blog in your comment so others can visit you to see how you used this spread.

Crystal Visions Tarot

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Tarot Comparisons: Ace of Wands

Let’s take a look at the Ace of Wands. Traditionally this card is read as the start of a creative project when upright and a lack of creative passion when reversed.

The way we interpret a card can change based on the art of the card itself. Compare the following Ace of Wands:

RWS1W

Rider Waite Tarot

D1W

Deviant Moon

Th1W

Thoth

CE1W

Cat’s Eye

How does the message of inspiration and creation get changed or enhanced in the four cards.

Leave your thoughts in the comments. All commenters will be entered in our December drawing so make sure you leave us a working email. Thanks.

The Sacred World Oracle Deck: Reading by Kayla Garnet Rose, Ph.D.

 Dr. Kayla Garnet Rose, Ph.D. graciously allowed us to repost her blog post.

Written and illustrated by Kris Waldherr, creator of The Goddess Tarot, The Sacred World Oracle deck is a sumptuous feast for the mind and an excellent gift for the upcoming holidays. The cards themselves are pleasing to eye, beautifully illustrated with animals, both real and mythological; pleasing to the hand, nice and thick yet well sized for smaller folks; and further complemented by the rich descriptions found in the accompanying booklet. Waldherr writes, “Oracles bear the double duty of being the message as well as the vehicle to communicate it…”

The Sacred World Oracle is divided into four sections- earth, water, fire, and air. Each suit has a main card for the element, plus ten associated animals. The mythology of each is contained within the booklet, however, merely gazing at the images evokes personal resonances, memories, and inspirations. Two different spreads are also outlined in the LWB, one a past-present-future card spread, fairly standard. The other a five card spread developed by Thalassa of the Daughter’s of Divination’s San Francisco Bay Area Tarot Symposium ( BATS) was inspired by the ballet Swan Lake is called Black Swan, White Swan. This spread “helps us explore our blind spots – those pesky obstacles we can’t, or don’t want to see. It also points to the wisdom that lies in front of our noses.”
I shuffled the cards, pensating upon it being Day of the Dead. I had a ho-hum Halloween yesterday and had no plans for the new moon this weekend, so doing the Swan reading seemed like a good way to acknowledge the change of seasons and tap into the thinning of the veils. I whispered the names of my ancestors as well as my kin/cats passed, friends who have crossed over and even contemplated my own death, hopefully far into the future. It has been in a time of endings and beginnings, as my daughter started college and I completed my PhD, empty nest syndrome hitting hard after her last visit. Recognizing the new chapter of my life unfolding, I pulled the five cards…
The first card is the black swan, or what you need to see that can get in your way. I pulled I-Earth. A very green card, right away I was aware of the animals suggested not just in the distant mountains but in the nearby copses, a huge oak in the foreground, beautifully framed with vining flowers and a picture of Ivy at the bottom. I reflect up upon how much time I have spent inside my house, working on my studies in particular, especially since my sweetie was hospitalized last spring and we stopped going on our weekend hikes. “When the Earth card appears in an Oracle reading, look for opportunities to take your dreams and turn them into a concrete reality” advises Waldherr. Certainly there is the opportunity to turn my dissertation into a book, changing a thought into form, but I also recognized the message to spend time in the outside world as much as in my interior landscape, and to change my isolation over the last six months into more outgoing, social adventures.
The second card is the magic feather, what you can do about it, and I pull XLIII- The Centaur – half human, half horse, pulling on an arrow notched into a bow, the classic sign of Sagittarius. As an astrologer I reflect that this sign symbolizes the higher mind, higher education, philosophy and travel. Here is the ability to focus on a goal, pull back to take aim, and the follow through. Mercury being retrograde, I notice it is a time of pulling back, with the trust that full moment will be gained after the planets shift in November. A card of being proactive, I feel encouraged to review my long term projects list and initiated some dreams that have been simmering on the back burner.
The third card is the White Swan, or what you need to see that can help you. I draw XXVII- Dragonfly. A lovely woman, maybe from South America, gazes at me, tattooed cheeks, a red dragonfly before her, a jaguar peeping in the background. Several of my students spring to mind, both past and present. The message here is of “unexpected grace found in difficult places”. I laugh, this has been my lesson the last two weeks. In The Medicine Cards, dragonfly is a message to confront denials, honor inner truths and to break through any illusions.
The fourth card is also a magic feather, or how to use the solution presented in the card. Now I pull XXXIX- Firefly. I liked the transition from an air element (dragonfly) to a fire element, the ability to change thoughts into action. I grew up on the east coast, so catching fireflies reminded me of my childhood, times past, not an experience I have here now, living in California. Interestingly, the message here is to “seek moments of unexpected beauty that offer gateways for inspiration.”
Finally, the fifth card is known as the Swan in Flight, an aerial perspective of the situation which gives an overview of the problems and steps for a solution. I pull II -Cat. Very curious, since I had completely shuffled the cards to pull the first card as the beginning card and the second card as the last, let alone the fact that I had invoked all of my past familiars/cats when setting my intentions. Here we see the Egyptian cat goddess, Bast, in a temple, with cats and kittens all around, even perching on the shoulder of the icon. My personal talisman, again my kin, my family, I am at times ridiculously attached to my cats and find it difficult to leave them for a night, let alone a vacation. The message in the booklet states, “the cat card challenges you to find ways to express your individuality. How can you create more magic and beauty?” Indeed, a good question.
So, personally I avoid using terms such as black/white to indicate problem/solution as it is basically racist if not simply reductionist. I did like the concept of exploring blind spots but wish it was presented in a way that was color blind. That being said, the cards themselves have a wonderful array of images, and although focused on animals, include humans in an international array, from Ganesha to Cimidye. The booklet really covers a gamut of worldwide folklore and hopefully will be expanded into a book. I honor that the author chose to use roman symbols for the cards, reminiscent of the Major Arcana in the Tarot, but I found the need to stop and calculate into western numbers a little tedious and off putting. The backs of each card had a representation of the four elements with the simple inscription, “As Above, So Below”. Indeed, a simple reminder that the “function of an oracle remains the same: oracles offer us information. They can provide us with the experience of synchronicity… Our personal experience serve to frame these events, thus releasing information we already possess deep in our psyche.”
Blessed be.

Get your own copy of this lovely oracle.

Office Oracle: Jody B

We have folks who do hard work. Jody is one of those. Here she is with Lynn A. Anyone know who that fellow in the middle is? LOL! Might be a hint on his shirt…

JodiBStella asked: What’s the best thing about your job?

JODY: Helping to bring a product into the world is fun work…and often it doesn’t seem like work at all. The bonus is seeing and holding the final printed piece.
 

Stella: What’s your favorite U.S. Games product?

 
HY165

Stella: What’s one thing you like to do when you are not at work?

JODY: Cook
 

Stella: If you were a Tarot card, which one would you be?

 
JODY: TemperanceHalloween_17Star

 

Stella: What’s your favorite music?

 
JODY: Can’t pick just ONE favorite…
 

So what questions would you want to ask Jodi? Do you think it would be fun to work at U.S. Games?