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The Golden Dawn Tarot
The Golden Dawn Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE GOLDEN DAWN TAROT:

"The Golden Dawn Tarot" is an esoteric deck, based on the systems used by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Wang worked under the direction of Israel Regardie, with card interpretations based on those developed by S. L. MacGregor Mathers. In his foreword, Stuart Kaplan notes that the Golden Dawn Society included as its members some of the foremost occultists and writers of its time. As part of their sacred oath, they were sworn to secrecy. Based upon the esoteric notebooks of some of these members, under the guidance of Dr. Israel Regardie, Wang has faithfully produced, in authentic detail, each card in the Golden Dawn Tarot.

Kaplan sees the publication of this deck as an important "missing link" in the development of Tarot. His suggestion is to study this deck along with other decks that evolved from the work of Golden Dawn members, such as the "Rider-Waite Tarot" (by A. E. Waite and Pamela Coleman Smith), the "Builders of Adytum" (BOTA) deck issued under the guidance of Paul Foster Case, and the "Thoth Tarot", by Aleister Crowley and Lady Frieda Harris.

Wang, in his introductory notes, refers to the "Golden Dawn Tarot" as the only truly esoteric deck ever to be published. It is also the only deck to reach public view that was designed for the exclusive use of a powerful secret fraternity. Included in this deck is esoteric symbolism that has been kept shrouded in mystery as part of the Western Esoteric Tradition. As does Kaplan, Wang notes that this is the deck from which some of the greatest esoteric writers of our age developed their ideas about the Tarot.

Wang notes that the basic design of the cards comes from the work of S. L. MacGregor Mathers, following the framework of the Inner Tradition. Credit goes to Moira Mathers, S. L. MacGregor Mathers wife, for illustrating the original cards. Also noted is that after initiation into the grade of "Adeptus Minor", one of the tasks of the adept was to hand-paint a copy of the Tarot deck.

According to Wang, the purpose of the Tarot is to teach -- teach about the nature of the universe, and about man's relationship to the universe. Wang also sees the Tarot as illustrating the energies of the mystical system of Qabalah. The use of the Tarot for divination is seen as a means to provide an introduction to the visual patterns and subtle energies of the Tarot. In this respect, the true worth of the cards comes from repetitive usage, which helps to stimulate the unconscious and help develop psychic powers.

One spread is given in the LWB (Little White Book) for use by the reader, and it is simply termed the "Fifteen Card Method of Tarot Divination". The spread was specifically developed so that the meanings of the cards could be determined from their relationship to neighboring cards (Elemental Dignities), rather than using reversals. The spread is set out in groups of three, and is not difficult to lay down, or to interpret.

There are 84 cards that come with this deck: the traditional 78 cards of the Tarot, four blank white cards, a card illustrating the positions on the Tree of Life, and a card listing in text the "Key to the Tarot on the Tree of Life". The cards themselves are 3" by 5", of good quality, glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/2" white border, followed by a 1/2" green border, with symbols at the four corners, midway down each side, and in the middle of the bottom of the card. In the center we see a Cross, color coded by element, with a glyph of the Tree of Life in the middle. This graphic alone is well worth study for the symbolism that it contains.

There are some very interesting aspects to this deck, such as the appearance of luminescence around certain figures or objects (the upper body and head of the Fool; the entire body of the Magician, High Priestess; the head and scepter of the Empress, and the bird behind her; the head of the Emperor; the head and upper body of the Hierophant; the head and lamp of the Hermit; all of the Wheel of Fortune; the head of Justice; the head of the Hanged Man; all of Temperance; the Star; the three figures on the Moon; the male and female figures in Judgment; the four corner glyphs and the center figure in the World; the figures in the Court Cards).

For the most part, the symbols and figures used in this deck will be familiar to those readers using traditional decks. The Fool becomes a small child, plucking fruit from a tree; the High Priestess stands facing the reader, a cup held in front of her with both hands; the Chariot is shown as riding through the sky; the Hanged Man is suspended over water; there is a fire in the background of the Temperance card; yods appear in the sky, under the glyph of the moon, in the Moon card.

All of the suits show a stark white background, with a hand coming out of the clouds, holding the requisite number of suit symbols for each card. The Ace of Wands shows a tri-part wand, surrounded by Yods. Included in the suit of Cups is the use of flowers, as well as fish in the Two of Cups. The suit of Swords includes a red flower in some cards, with red Yods in other cards. The suit of Pentacles makes use of a "living branch" -- a branch that shows green leaves, as well as the suit symbol. For all of the suits, Kings are shown on horseback, Queens are shown seated on a throne, Princes are shown driving chariots, and Princesses are shown standing, appearing to be wearing some type of armor.

Each time I use this deck, I see more and more symbolism in it. It is easy to use, would fit well into readings, comparative readings, journaling, story, meditation, ritual, and ceremony. There is a companion book for this deck, written by Robert Wang ("An Introduction To the Golden Dawn Tarot") that is very helpful in working with this deck. For a student interested in studying the esoteric aspects of the Tarot, for someone looking for an alternative deck to offer their clients as a choice for doing a Tarot reading, or for a Tarot collector, this is a "must have" deck.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Tarot of a Moon Garden
Tarot of a Moon Garden

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF A MOON GARDEN:

At first, I wasn't sure I was going to like this deck, but it seemed to just kind of "grow" on me as I began to use it more in Tarot readings -- and clients requested this deck a lot for readings. It's actually a very delightful and charming deck of tarot cards. Each of the cards depicts a night scene, with the exception of the Sun Card, which shows a bright and glorious sunny morning. Some readers dislike this deck because they feel that it's too "cute," however, I think of it more as being a "magical fairyland" type of deck. It is a fun and enchanting deck to read with, once you become accustomed to it. There are no frightening images in this deck, so it's a good choice for the beginning young reader or anyone else that either wants to read the cards or get a reading but is hesitant about the traditional images of most decks. Tarot of a Moon Garden reduces any "harshness" that may be found in some decks.

You'll find delightful images such as flowers, castles, fairies, dolphins, and hot air balloons. Artist Marie Sweikhardt works with the idea that the moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, lush jungles, mysterious caverns, and exotic flowers -- like a lunar Garden of Eden.

It is a soft and gentle deck that follows the Rider-Waite tradition and symbolism but in a much calmer way. It's a deck suitable for reading for or about children as well. Although not the deck for everyone, it's certainly a welcome change for a few moments of escape into an enchanted land of childhood magic. When the mood is whimsical, this can be a very nice deck to turn to. In August 2007, Tarot of Moon Garden was reintroduced and is once again available. So if you missed it during a time of being out-of-print, it's available again.

-- Velvet Angel, on Tarot Wisdom Readings


This imaginative deck weaves traditional images with mythic expression and elemental magic into a 78-card deck full of inspiration and insight. Beautifully illustrated by Karen Marie Sweikhardt this whimsical, full-color deck depicts an enchanted garden with exotic flowers, castles, and hot air balloons. The first thing that grabbed my attention was the colors and dreamlike images and it was a real pleasure to work with. The card stock is terrific and shuffles very easily and the image on the backs are not only reversible but intricate and pleasing to the eye.

The Major Arcana are stunning to look, at depicting fairies, dragons, butterflies and unicorns and even the moon herself makes an appearance in several of the cards. The Minor Arcana have dragonflies for the hilts of the Swords suit, mystical trees in the Staffs suit, there are butterflies, ferns and other foliage in the Cups suit and the Pentacles suit with it's large pentacle orbs floating across it's images. This deck is a delight to look at and definitely a joy to work with and makes a terrific deck for both beginner and experienced alike.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic


The Tarot of a Moon Garden deck was my 8 year-old son's first deck, given to him on his 6th birthday. The cards have been described as very feminine and romantic but we find them, instead, very gentle and magical. It is the perfect first deck for any young witch or wizard or of course for those young at heart.

The cards are easy to read and are filled with beautiful images and great detail. From the moment they're taken out of the box they seem to exude a kind of soft, magical transcendence. For a young reader they're just the thing to open the mind and senses to the "elsewhere".

Reading these cards or having them read for you, transports you to a gentler, more magical time. Every card in the deck, major and minor Arcana alike, brings one closer to a more innocent yet mysterious way of being. Even the death and devil cards are done in such a way as to adhere to the old standards (which I much prefer) and yet convey the message in a gentle, non-frightening way.

One would be hard put to find a better deck for the up and coming spiritual generation. Indeed, my number one recommendation for a child's first set of tarot cards would have to be the Tarot of a Moon Garden.

-- Winter, on Aeclectic Tarot


The moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, mysterious caverns, lush jungles and exotic flowers. Sweikhardt weaves the traditional tarot symbolism into her images of a lunar Garden of Eden where there are dragonflies, butterflies, dolphins, dragons and unicorns around every corner. The inspiration card states Welcome to a Realm Where Myth and Magic are the Reality.

Journey into the Moon Garden and reflect on the phases of the lunar energy. It is a very bright, bold, and colorful deck taking you to a time of magic as it weaves traditional tarot symbolism, mythic expression and elemental magic. A tapestry for you to discover. As Sweikhardt states she started this as a poem, Moon Garden, and from there it blossomed into this wonderful fanciful enchanted deck.

It will soon be, if it is not already, a collector’s item, one you will want for your own collection, or just to have. Great for using and reading children, or for children to explore the Tarot.

-- Sally, on Aeclectic Tarot


My friend bought me a deck of cards as a gift. The deck was The Tarot of the Moon Garden. Immediately I felt soothed by its images of dancing fairies, protective dragons and lush gardens. Every card stirred feelings of hope and dreams achieved, even the cards associated with negative portents such as the Tower or the Devil. This deck is still my favorite and the ideal first set for anyone wishing to explore the mysteries of the Tarot. I find them deeply emotional, describing how events affect the questioner emotionally rather than detailing events. I feel these cards empathize with the questioner, place a comforting hand on their shoulder or join in with the cheers when all is well. They are a positive, gentle deck, eager to find positive results from the most negative events, but not give you a false hope, a false sense of security, keen to show events you'll face, keen to reassure you of their support.

They can be mischievous, I've never found any other deck with such personality, prone to mood swings if they're not treated right giving absolutely nothing to read, deathly silent especially if you query their advice. The fantasy beings depicted sum up perfectly these cards, encouraging the reader to dig deeper into a world of plenty, always offering encouragement. This is a set everyone should read at least once; they bring a rare innocent, childlike quality to an art often daunting when first practiced.

-- Niki, on Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg  Deck
Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg Deck
What customers are saying about Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg
 
The Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg has an interesting and unusual history with a bit of mystery thrown in. In 1987, Stuart Kaplan, chairman of U.S. Games Systems, Inc. (who publish many of our Tarot decks) saw some artwork that was created by Yury Shakov.
 
Shakov was a well-known Russian artist who specialized in miniatures. His jewelry, intricately decorated Easter eggs and detailed miniature icons were sought after by museums and collectors. At this time, Shakov was recognized as the foremost miniaturist in American even though he had only been in the country for a few years. Kaplan was fascinated by Shakov’s work and decided that he would like to commission Shakov to do a Tarot deck in this distinctive Russian style. It was a few months before the artist would agree to paint the deck. He knew nothing about the Tarot so he had to become acquainted with Tarot as well as develop 78 original miniature paintings.
 
Over the next two years Yury Shakov created the master designs for the entire deck and he painted the Major Arcana and the Cups. When you realize that he painted these cards to size, just as you see them, you can appreciate the amount of painstaking work that went into them. Miniaturists must brace their arm as they work with brushes that are often so fine they contain only a single hair. Shakov loved his art so much that he sometimes worked for 16 hours a day.
 
Unfortunately, Yury Shakov didn’t live long enough to complete his deck, he died suddenly in March 1989. Stuart Kaplan decided to commission a second Russian artist to finish the deck in Shakov’s style using Shakov’s notes and sketches.
 
And here is where the mystery comes in, we don’t know who the second artist is. His or her name was never made public. We also don’t know exactly how much input this artist had in the renderings because Shakov’s notes and sketches have been lost. When you look at the two artists work you can tell a difference in the cards. Shakov’s Trumps and Cups are much more detailed and ornate than the Clubs, Swords and Coins. Shakov used several decks as references, the Tarot of Marseilles, the Classic Tarot and the Waite deck while adding his own touches of Russian art, history and folklore. The deck follows the basic images of the Waite with Russian costumes and backgrounds. The cards seem to focus on the figures while background images are a bit sparse.
 
The Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg is a truly beautiful deck. All cards have a black background but the colors of the images are vibrant. The cards have an oval frame of gold filigree, the Trumps and each suit has a slightly different variation of the filigree. All cards have a thin solid gold outer border. Shakov’s Trumps and Cups don’t appear to feature any one color but the other suits do. You will find purple featured in the Coins, green in the Clubs and red in the Swords.
 
The Trump cards are numbered and titled, the suits are titled. The Courts are the standard Page, Knight, Queen and King. The deck is laminated and printed in Belgium.
 
The card backs have yet another slight variation of the gold filigree frame. All of the suits are represented with a Coin sitting on a Cup and a Sword and Club crossed behind. Sitting on the Coin is a Russian helmet.
Angelfire

This deck is unusual in a few ways. First, it was started by Yury Shakov - he finished number of the cards, along with the preliminary sketches for the rest - but the remainder were finished by an unknown Russian artist at his death. There really isn't much difference in their styles, the continuity of the deck is amazing. Each card is rendered in sharp detail. This includes a border in gold on the face, mirrored on the back. Both the major and minor arcana are done in full detail, and this in one of the first decks I have personally run into printed on a black background. It puts a whole new cast on the deck, gives it a new feel, has a different effect on the spirit.
 
Lastly, even though this deck was not geared toward beginners (or those rediscovering the art) it is truly easy to read. Because of the detail mentioned before, those that do more instinctual reading instead of using the 'given' or 'proper' meaning of the cards are given a clear advantage. For example, while doing the first reading using this deck, the sun in the four of clubs seemed to pop out at me. Normally this wouldn't have been something to notice, but it was pivotal to the reading.
 
The little white booklet is also a nice help. The meaning and reversed meaning are easy to find, and it has the basic ten-card spread included.
 
This is a truly spiritual deck to me, and I'm glad I bought it. As soon as I took it home and got it out of the box, it clicked with me. Meanings of certain cards were coming to me just flipping through the deck. This is going to be the one I can't put down. 
—Cricket. Aeclectic Tarot
$23.95
SoulCards 2 Deck
SoulCards 2 Deck

 What customers are saying about SoulCards 2

“These cards are incredible. They are vessels of guidance through which people can allow insight from their interior to emerge into their conscious minds.”

—Caroline Myss, Ph.D. author of Anatomy of the Spirit andSacred Contracts


“Like windows into our deepest self, these magnificent cards are an invitation to profound self-discovery.”

—Joan Borysenko, Ph.D. author of A Woman’s Book of Life


“These cards have an amazing spirit and presence within the. If you found the first set inspirational, this new collection will be even more so, reaching a new depth of power and resonance.”

—David Spangler, author of Blessing and The Call


Done with beautiful colors you will find that there are no right and wrong answers for these cards. They are remarkable. There isn't a book that tells you what each image means, instead the pictures speak to you as the reader. These cards are great for readings.

The use of colors and the images themselves tell you what you need to know. As you can see in the images, you notice the colors and then the people and how they must feel or their thoughts. There are 60 cards in each Soul cards deck. They can be used separately or together to make the deck itself 120 cards.

There are subtle symbols in the cards themselves. One only has to look to see them. Again, these cards are a must for beginners and professionals.

Soul Cards 2: Images drawn from depths of the human psyche. The images evoke profound insight and inspiration. This deck can stand fully on it's own but also enriches, compliments and expands the scope of the original deck. Again this set comes with a little booklet that suggests a wealth of ways to use the deck on it's own and in combination with the original deck.

Deidrul, Aeclectic Tarot 

$24.95
Rider-Waite® Tarot Deck
Rider-Waite® Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT RIDER_WAITE® TAROT DECK:

What exactly is it about this deck? Today there are literally hundreds of tarot decks to choose from, most of which are artistically superior to this seemingly rudimentary little deck. And yet, those many decks, which use subtle colors, modern printing techniques and even computer imaging, fail to compete with it. Why? The Rider deck truly has a soul, and its images shoot straight to the heart. People can often "intuitively" read this deck without any previous experience with the tarot. If the point of art is to make you feel your humanity, this deck's art is truly amazing. For all its coarse lines and flat colors, the deck somehow rises above itself, gracefully conveying all aspects of the human condition. The Rider deck is a perfect first and last deck. Pamela Colman Smith's unique symbolism ranges from the simple to the truly arcane ... It stirs the psyche and livens the soul. If you are in the market for a deck, my advice is to look not only with your eyes, but with your heart. The Rider deck is not as "glittery" as some of its more modern counterparts, but in the long run it is a wonderful and rewarding tarot without equal.

-- Andryh, Amazon customer

$21.95
African Tarot
African Tarot

What customers are saying about African Tarot 

 
This could very well be the single cutest tarot deck in existence.
The title "African Tarot" is probably quite offputting to many people: are the art and descriptions specifically meant for Black people? Not at all. I am a black woman in Washington state and have showed this deck to countless white friends who have found it adorable. Its booklet displays meanings that seem pretty much standard to Rider-Waite system. Indeed, I've seen this deck defined as a "Rider-Waite clone".
 
The suits are also traditional: Wands, Swords, Cups and Pentacles. However, in the artwork the Swords are depicted as spears, the Cups as gourds and the Pentacles as golden discs. It is a very colorful (mainly primary colors, even), happy little deck, even though the people rarely give more than a vague Mona Lisa-type smile, if that. They have dark skin and dredlocks, but that's about where any cultural departure ends.
 
The artwork, however, was the clincher for me. There are a lot of "whimsical" decks out there with "childlike" art, but so help me, the art on the African Tarot is something I'd be *proud* to display on my 'fridge. It's childlike, but also of good quality and seems very secure in itself, a rarity in many homegrown "whimsical" decks.
The cards are approximately 3" x 2.5" and covered with what I assume is a standard, slick coating. This makes them easy to shuffle, but I have a habit of dropping some cards if I'm just going through them while holding them in my hands. The design on the back is as charming as each individual card design -- two spotted tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see either of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers the tortoise a symbol of "the slow coming of justice". Appropriate, no?
 
The deck comes in a brown, corregated cardboard container, which, after a few years of ownership, still seems quite sturdy. Both sides of the box are decorated with the same cardstock as the deck, with hints of the art style and relevant information printed on them. It gives the box a very environmental feel that goes with the deck very well.
The authors have subtitled the deck "Journey Into the Self." It is meant to be a lighter deck, and a loved deck. For me, it is. Very much loved, in fact. However, don't let the "lighter" aspect fool you. One of the spookiest tarot experiences I've ever had, involving a lost -- and later recovered -- card and some odd correspondences, happened involving this deck. It's not a *fluff* tarot. I would consider it more of a powerful specialty deck.
 
—Ashe Monday, Aeclectic Tarot 

I have previously used the Rider-Waite deck and found it to be rather "stuffy" for my tastes. I purchased the African Tarot deck at the recommendation of others and love it. I have already used it several times - it has wonderful pictures and I get a great feel from the images and explanations on the cards. You will not be disappointed!
 
—“Book Fiend”, Amazon Customer

This has got to be the cutest deck ever! It is a Rider-Waite variation and has been created mainly for beginners. Colorful, light-hearted and whimsical, this deck is really small (2.5 - 3 inches) and looks like it has been drawn by children. There is no real traditional African art on these cards, but there is the flair of an African village in all scenes, and the faces of the people are black. If you like light-hearted and fun decks, this will probably become a favorite for you.
 
Katerina, U.K. Amazon customer

A lot of people may be put off by the idea of an "African Tarot Deck," thinking that it must involve voodoo, arcane tribal symbolism, or just be for black people. Well, I'm a black woman who has shown this deck to white friends -- this deck is completely accessible.
 
The "African Tarot: Journey into the Self" is a teeny little deck based on Rider-Waite symbology. It also looks like it was drawn by a child with talent -- the sort of art that you'd *want* to put on your fridge. The people are brown and have kinky hair, and they live in an African village -- after that, and a few liberties with the suit cards -- it's a standard deck.
 
The suits, by the way, are traditionally named. However, the art shows Swords as spears, Cups as gourds and Pentacles as coins or disks. The art is rich and perhaps a tad dark for some, perhaps it's best not to read this one in low light -- but then, it's far from a gothic deck. The back design is equally darling -- two colorful tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see one of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers this animal a symbol of "the slow coming of justice" -- appropraite enough considering its country of origin.
 
I even find the package a total keeper: a brown, corrugated cardboard box with descriptive cards glued to the back and front. A rubberband to keep the box closed and you could probably drop this deck into your backpack and only have the box take damage. However, the box is so cute, why would you want to?
 
The little booklet inside confirms the image that this is a feel-good deck -- many of the interpretations are positive or at least encouraging of growth. So, while this isn't an all-occasion deck, I certainly think it's worth a look!
 
—R. Byrd, Amazon custome
$18.95
Witchlings Deck & Book Set
Witchlings Deck & Book Set

What customers are saying about Witchlings Deck & Book Set

Paulina Cassidy, creator of the Joie de Vivre Tarot and Paulina Tarot decks, has created a new cast of forty lyrical and eccentric ladies to grace her newest deck of oracle cards. These feminine occultists dance, posture, levitate, and fly as they invite us into their magical world. If you don’t know Cassidy’s work, this deck is a perfect introduction. If you’re already a fan, you’ll be delighted with this addition to Paulina’s repertoire.

The accompanying 200-page Witchlings Book of Spells adds insight and instruction to the charms of these spellbinding enchantresses. The spells are augmented with candle and color —magic, crystal energy, chanting, and detailed meditations to make all your dreams come true. Pick a card. Introduce yourself. Start making magic!

—Anna Jedrziewski

This is an absolutely adorable little card set! Complete with little mantras and positive spells to manifest your dreams in your life, this little deck has cute little witches to inspire you! This is great for a beginner learning about spell work, and also great for experienced practitioners to help us remember the magic of life! I would fully recommend these to anybody looking to bring inspiration back into their lives. :}

—T.M. McBroom, Amazon customer

Adorable, sweet, uplifting, powerful and witchy! Once again, Paulina Cassidy and U.S. Games Systems, Inc., hit one out of the park!  Witchlings is a deck and book set that is filled with easy spells and magick that anyone can use. It is well written, beautifully designed and well produced.

Witchlingsis a 40-card deck with a 204-page black and white illustrated, paperback companion book called Witchlings – Book of Spells.  The set is housed in a heavy duty, lift top cardboard box, which is sealed in plastic. The deck is also sealed in plastic.  

Each image is delightful in Ms. Cassidy’s unique styling. All of the images feature a starry background. Orion the owl, the Universal familiar, is present with each Witchling. He serves as a protector, mentor, assistant and friend.

The Determination card features a light blue border with a charming Witchling, named Mimosa. She is wearing muted red and black, perched cross-legged, on her broom. The key phrase says “Determination is the power within to keep you from giving up on your dreams.” The Book of Spells has instructions for a sachet and a poppet. It also has a candle ritual and gives directions for infusing a clear quartz crystal with the intention of willpower, determination and achieving goals. 

The deck is designed to be used as a single card draw or up to 3 cards to use together. Ms. Cassidy suggests drawing a card and working with that particular Witchling as long as needed.

The book provides a list of easy-to-find Spellcrafting Equipment, information about Candle Color Magick, Gemstone Magick, Herb and Spice Magick, and Essential Oil Magick.

Witchlings can be used by anyone that is interested in learning about magick and wants to keep things simple and straightforward.  This make a nice addition to everyone’s magick tool kit.

—Terri Clement, ATA Tarot Reflections


I have been waiting very patiently for 2 years for these cards and  they do not disappoint! Absolutely beautiful artistry love them, a delightful deck to use. The wait has been worth it thanks Paulina simply stunning!!!!!

—Lisa Manning, Amazon customer

$22.95
OMEGALAND
OMEGALAND

What customers are saying about Omegaland Tarot 

These five stars are not because this is a great Tarot Deck, but because this is a great fun deck. It's like having endless adventures in the grim future if you use it like an old fashioned Pulp Writer's Story Wheel. If you want a deck of cards you can use to prod and prompt your imagination this is the best I have found thus far.

—J.F. Smith-Schroers, Amazon customer


As an owner of 300 tarot decks (yes, each thoughtfully collected), I am pleased to say "Omegaland" is a welcome new addition. The imagery is unique, accessible, thought provoking. I am a fan of post apocalyptic fantasy and this fills the bill. I also appreciate that female images are respectfully portrayed as strong- but not 'manlike'- capable people. I love it!

—Dr. Honeybee, Amazon customer


The Omegaland tarot is an anomalous deck by U. S. Games Systems, Inc. Influenced by the current trend in post-apocalyptic texts, survivalist reality shows, and an epidemic of zombie series such as The Walking Dead, Z Nation, and iZombie, as well as militia culture this unusual deck is set in a lawless society where violence is the rule. It is hard to tell if this deck is a bit tongue-in-cheek or is totally serious, and being marketed to a heretofore untapped demographic – the redneck. Given that this is also a card game that you can play on those cold nights in the bunker complex it may not be entirely humorless. 

So in your a few spare minutes when you aren't out scavenging, looting, or reloading your guns, you grab a bunch of pencils and card 'liberated' from an abandoned school and draw yourself a deck of tarot cards. Your art style is a little rough-hewn, a bit chainsaw art, but your nouvelle redneck compatriots will love your depiction of their crumbling world – Harleys and handguns – this is how you roll. 

This is a 78 card tarot – with 22 Major Arcana and 56 Minor Arcana. In the Major Arcana no Trumps have been renamed, and there are no significant departures from the Rider Waite Smith standard. In the Minor Arcana, Coins have been recast as cans of food, Cups are now water canteens both big and small, Swords have become crossbows, and Wands are now guns. The court cards remain standard – Kings, Queens, Knights, Pages. All cards have both numbers and titles beneath the illustration, in addition the Minor Arcana have a letter and/or number (for the card game) written on a scrap of masking tape in the top left-hand corner. 

The cards measure 72 x 120 mm. The card stock is fairly high quality, solid and inflexible, with a smooth low sheen finish. The deck sits nicely in the hands and shuffles smoothly. The print is crisp and clean, sharp lines, clear colors, no blurring or bleeding of the images. The palette is somewhat military in nature – lots of browns, khaki, olive drab, grey, with occasional splashes of red, orange, pale blue, and grass green. The artists style is blocky and choppy – a studied amateurishness. 

The Little White Book is 52 pages long, with instructions in English only. Using faux-typewriter print, information is given in the first person by your guide through Omegaland. This is an anonymous, masculine voice, full of gruff smarts and survivalist wisdom, that tells it like it is. The divinatory meanings are quite standard, but refreshingly shorn of all esoteric jargon. Each card has a little bit of narrative that explains what is happening in the image, seamlessly melded with interpretations. This is followed by one, or more, keywords that summarize the essence of the card. This is really good information, bluntly put, with no ambiguities. There are no interpretations for reversed cards given. There is a 'Survival Spread' included – a 6-card draw with Location, Food, Weapons, Fuel, Drink, and Stockpile to help the Seeker divine their future. Instructions for the games are provided on a further 12 pages of the LWB and 6 additional cards. There are separate rules for 3 players, for 4-6 players, and free-for-all games. 

This is a truly unusual tarot deck – one of several more masculine decks to appear on the market lately. While much of its symbolism departs radically from more standard images it is still a functional deck. I would not recommend it for beginners, however if you are an experienced tarot reader with an interest in post-apocalyptic landscapes then this may well be the deck for you. 

—MedusaWink, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
MUDRAS For Awakening The Energy Body
MUDRAS For Awakening The Energy Body

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT Mudras For Awakening The Energy Body

Mudras For Awakening the Energy Body is a deck and book set that I have had my eye on for months now, before it was even released out onto the market. The production value by U.S. Games here is way high. If yoga, meditation, or Eastern mysticism is of any interest to you, then I recommend that you get this deck.

The book is not just an accompaniment to the cards, but is an independent text all on its own, covering Eastern mystic energy body and chakra principles to the auric field and the hand mudras categorized by the chakras they stimulate. The book itself is 111 pages, a matte finish cover, and perfect bound. The book does a fantastic job explaining hand mudras to the Western reader, so I won’t get too much into it. You have to get Mudras and read it for yourself. Seriously. Best comprehensive explanation ever. In a nutshell, though, Eastern mystics believe that metaphysical energy can be transferred and transmuted through your hands in very potent ways, and hand mudras are formations of the hands and fingers that serve very specific metaphysical functions. In terms of inner alchemy, which is really what this text Mudras focuses on without actually using that term “inner alchemy,” you can use hand mudras along with meditation, mindfulness, and other practices to align, correct and stimulate your personal energy body.

There are so many uses these cards could serve, given the brilliant, bold coloring. You’ll see that the cards are double-sided, meaning there are no “card backs” as you might find in traditional oracle decks. One side covers one of the chakras or hand mudras, and the other side offers text to explain the chakra or mudra. So you can use these cards as a learning deck, to educate yourself.

Next, the hand mudra cards are color coded by the chakras they stimulate.

I love the conciseness of the information and the way it is organized. It’s very easy on the eyes and enables the data to be quite digestible. You’ll note that the information on all of these cards are found verbatim in the accompanying book. Thus, deck and book can be used as standalones. If you want to learn, you can take just the book around with you to study hand mudras. Or you can work with just the cards. And if you only have the cards, it’s okay; you don’t actually need the book to look up any information. All the info you would need is right there on the card. I really love the bright colors of these cards. They bring such a feeling of energy and calm.

Then you turn over the cards for more information. Use the “Focus” affirmations to guide your mindfulness. Incorporate the mudras themselves into your yoga or meditation practices. Note the contents of each card and how you might use that information to work on where you are right now in terms of your spiritual path.

I found it quite cool that, randomized and drawing the cards out with eyes closed, the sequence of cards per chakras kind of follow the mind, body, and spirit sequence. Having a sacral chakra mudra card appear for my mind suggests needing to focus on individuality right now. The root chakra for body makes sense, as does the crown chakra for spirit. You’re going to find the same beautiful synchronicities for yourself when using these cards. There’s definitely a strong calming, spiritual energy about this deck that you can’t help but absorb.

Benebell Wen, author of Holistic Tarot

$22.95
Chrysalis Tarot Book
Chrysalis Tarot Book

What customers are saying about Chrysalis Tarot Book

I have been patiently awaiting the publication of a companion book to the Chrysalis Tarot, and I am incredibly pleased with what has been presented to the Chrysalis Tarot reader.

What I found through the Two Parts of this guide was the heart and mythology of Chrysalis Tarot. The voice of the book weaves origins of imagery, sensation and the soul of what makes Chrysalis Tarot work.

After Toney Brooks invites you to journey onward through his thoughtful Introduction there is a dynamic Foreword, written by the enchanting Tali Goodwin. Her passage is illuminating and indicative of the harmonious tone of masterfully composed pages, written by Holly Sierra and Toney Brooks.

Holly Sierra was gracious enough to share her early sketches of every single one of the 78 cards in the Chrysalis Tarot deck. She continues with anecdotes about her process and/or what the creative duo went through to accomplish the final result of the images we use today.
Toney Brooks defines the nuance, emotion and purpose of these characters some of us have come to know.

What I most enjoyed about this book is the fact that, as you read on, it feels as though you are sitting at tea with Holly and Toney, as they describe these many friends of theirs. The chat carries on to express the various attributes and way in which these friends may assist you in your everyday life.
After reading this book, I felt as if I had met Chrysalis Tarot's family. As if I was privy to baby photos and stories of childhood milestones, and I fell in love all over again.

I highly recommend this book. It has everything you are looking for in a tarot companion. I believe in, what I call, The Chrysalis Tarot System. This book will help you navigate through using the deck, of course. However, it will also help shed light along your path.

-Giuliana M. Ramirez, Chrysalis Tarot Study Group administrator


I love the Chrysalis Tarot but having this book to refer to has really helped me develop a deeper connection with the cards, which I use in my daily morning reading. I found that the little book that came with the deck just wasn't quite enough but this book gives more depth of meaning and explanations of the origins of each card and that has really helped me make a better connection with the deck. Thank you.

—MW, Amazon customer


I'm a huge fan of the Chrysalis Tarot: the artwork is magnificent, the symbolism and energy of the cards are truly unique. I don't think there is a better Tarot deck out there as a tool for personal growth and for gaining deeper insights on our journey.
Don't expect a "standard" book with defined and/or classical meanings of the cards (this is not a standard Tarot deck neither ;-)) The Chrysalis Tarot invites you to work with your imagination, to trust your intuition in giving your reading a personal interpretation ; by doing so, it definitely stimulates the connection with your Higher Self.

One of the many reasons Chrysalis is my favourite Tarot deck, is that each card and each explanation in the book provide a positive outlook. It matches my personal conviction that we can't always choose what happens to us, but we do always have a choice in how we will react on things. And there's always a way to approach events in a positive way, to learn from what's happening to us and how we evolve.
Toney Brooks does so much more than just "explaining the cards" and their meaning: you get fantastic shares about quantum physics, shamanism, mythology, etc.

Another thing I love about the book is that Holly Sierra introduces each card with some insights on why & how she created the card.
Overall, each card is discussed equally in the book: Majors, Minors and the Court cards get the same attention.
IMHO: this book is a must have if you like working with the Chrysalis Tarot or would like to get acquainted with it!

—Helene Ghillebaert, Amazon customer


What a FANTASTIC adventure! This book really is a "companion", both to the cards, and to your life! Having quickly read the introduction before shooting off out I was already hooked & couldn't wait to get home to read more! The layout is great, interesting chapters about all things mythological & metaphysical, based around the key "Characters" in the journey, followed by "The Hero's Journey" itself, an in depth guide to each card, complete with original sketches and the story behind the card, what inspired the design etc, right down to little details, like why there is a teeny Mouse in the corner, and why The Sun has a teardrop (no, "He" is not sad)...All these little things add to the thrill of the adventure and stay with you, lodging themselves in the memory bank to come jumping right back into your head when you then look through the cards! I read through the whole book before spending much time with the cards and didn't want to put it down! By the end of it I felt like I'd been on a journey & met some wonderful characters.....Just wish there was a sequel!

—Jackie Watson, Amazon customer


I've been reading my Chrysalis Companion book, well like its a new companion. I love this book! I've especially enjoyed being able to pull case studies of cards, and draw deeply from the reservoir of knowledge and myth presented within these pages. This has allowed me to deepen my own intuitions through understanding more of the correlations and associations with cards that come up regularly in my daily readings. Having this book to make quick references between the cards, opens the opportunity to study my own connections and patterns, and become more conscious of the synchronicity presenting in my life. Additionally, this book has inspired me to spend time with my cards in a new way! Studying each card in new context and themes, one by one with each turning page. The Chrysalis Tarot Book is a valuable study guide and reference book for its deck and for understanding the metaphysical world behind it. I love the golden thread woven through this book with art and storytelling, that truly makes a connection through the heart chakra and draws you in closer to relationship with the book's wisdom and maybe more importantly, your own.

—Kristen Vincent, Shamanic healer

$12.95
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE WONDERLAND TAROT

The collaborative team of Christopher and Morgana Abbey beautifully adapted the style and flavor of Sir John Tenniel's illustrations of Lewis Carroll's work to fit the typical Rider-Waite-Smith (RWS) system. The Major and Minor Arcanas are fully illustrated, facilitating the work of a reader who is familiar with the RWS symbolism. Of course, the replacement of the suits occasionally gives the reader pause (The Swords, Staves, Cups, and Pentacles are now Flamingos, Peppermills, Hats, and Oysters, respectively), but once the reader accommodates to that alteration, this deck is found to be quite easy to work with. The color and style of these cards provide a somewhat Victorianesque feel that may be quite appealing to many readers. One of the considerable benefits of this deck, however, is that the cards themselves are the approximate size of a standard playing deck. Readers who permit the querant to shuffle the cards may appreciate this, as many non-readers (indeed, as well as some readers!) have a difficult time shuffling the slightly larger sized cards that are characteristic of most Tarot decks. Individuals with more mundane plans for this deck are additionally fortunate in that the playing-card equivalent of the Minor Arcana is notated in the borders of each of the appropriate cards (e.g., the “Five of Spades” is noted in the border of the Five of Flamingos). Although best suited for someone who already possesses a bit of Tarot acumen, the little white book (LWB) included with the deck should be particularly helpful to those not already acquainted with Alice and her adventures. Each card is well described in terms of its depiction of characters and suggested divinatory meanings. In sum, the Wonderland Tarot is a surprisingly pleasant deck that provides a whimsical atmosphere, familiar symbolism, and convenience in handling. This is a marvelous combination for any Tarot deck.
—Tom LeBlanc, Aeclectic Tarot


One of the most noticeable things about this deck is that the traditional suits have been changed: swords = flamingos; rods = peppermills; cups = hats; and pentacles = oysters. The suits are also marked with the corresponding symbols from ordinary playing decks: hearts, diamonds, spades, and clubs. The artwork is based on that in Lewis Carroll's Wonderland books. All of the characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass appear, including the Walrus and the Carpenter, the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, Bill the Lizard, the Mock Turtle, and the Cheshire Cat. Lewis Carroll appears as the Magician. Of course Alice appears repeatedly throughout the deck.



The illustrations are well done and capture the spirit of the books, with story elements well matched to cards' meanings. The deck feels good to hold, in part because they are close to the size of a standard playing deck. Also, the cards are of sturdy high quality, and have a strong, positive metaphysical feeling. 
This is a very unique and original deck. I would suggest it to anyone who collects tarot or is a Wonderland fan.
—Amazon customer

$18.95