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The Crowley Tarot: The Handbook to the Cards
The Crowley Tarot: The Handbook to the Cards

What customers are saying about The Crowley Tarot Handbook

When starting out with a Crowley Thoth deck, this book is an excellent and comprehensive guide for understanding the extensive symbolism of this deck. Every card is fully described and the fluid, energetic art of Lady Frieda Harris is explained very well. Some beginning and intermediate Tarotists also find value in this book, even if they are not working with the Crowley deck, because of its guide to mythical, mystical, and historical symbolism found in many tarot decks.

—Margaret Ruth, author of Superconscious Relationships


Akron and Banzhaf's text is insightful and oracular, giving diviners plenty of poetic and mythic depth to work with as they discern the meanings of the cards and their spreads. If you're prepared to do the work, this text will at least grant you entry into Crowley's symbolic universe.

—Peter Fyfe, Amazon customer

$17.95
Dragon Tarot
Dragon Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DRAGON TAROT:

When I first became interested in reading the tarot, the one thing that I had a problem with was finding a deck that suited my feelings and represented ME. Then one day I stumbled upon the Dragon deck, and I felt like my prayers had been answered! The artwork and symbolism, combined with the rich history, myth, and mystique that surrounds dragons in general, turned out to be just what the doctor ordered. The use of many rich colors was something that I felt, at that point in time, many other decks didn't seem to have (although now I know otherwise). But, my absolute favorite part about this deck are the Major Arcana. They were (and still are) like nothing I had ever seen before. The capture all the symbolism of traditional tarot decks, but they also contain a draconic twist that is sometimes a bit funny (in particular, the Hanging Dragon card!).

All in all, the Dragon Tarot was the first deck I ever owned, and it remains my favorite to this day. I highly suggest this deck to anyone who doesn't feel connected to the more traditional decks, and longs for something deeper. It is very hard to put into words all that I feel with this deck, so you may be better off experiencing its power for yourself, but believe me, you won't regret it! Again, I have seen many decks in my days, but none of them compares to the power and imagery of the Dragon Tarot!

-- Charlie Taylor, on Aeclectic Tarot


I absolutely LOVE this deck. The images are beautiful and powerful and readings are very accurate for me. A friend of mine did one reading with my cards and has decided he wants a deck of his own. It is a very strong deck, but "welcoming," almost like coming home. If you like dragons, you will most likely connect with this deck and may keep it as your personal deck.

-- Kelli Riffle, on Amazon


Gorgeous artwork! This is the kind of deck that speaks to anyone with a love for dragons and dragon lore. I fell in love with it when it first came out, and I haven't used another Tarot deck since.

-- Nathalie Wigmore, on Amazon


I just received this deck and already love it! The dragons are most elegant, intelligent, powerful but not *terrifying*! The combination of dragons and Tarot symbolism may not always be clear for Tarot beginners, but Tarot folks who have a little imagination and love dragons will delight in this deck, and they will come to understand and value its unique messages. I did not care for the Celtic Dragon deck, think it's a bit sappy. By contrast, Pracownik's work has sophistication and edge, and the dragons are just simply gorgeous.

-- Eva A. on Amazon


The Dragon Tarot follows the now traditional path of a 78 card deck.

Each card is individually illustrated with dragons and adheres loosely to the Rider Waite deck for its' imagery.

So what's it like to use the Dragon Tarot? I love it!!!! Colorful, charming, quirky but full of dragon fun and humor. Both the reader and querent will enjoy the use of this deck. The dragon appeals to all with the mystery and beauty. I feel the Dragon Tarot takes us back to a more innocent time. A time perhaps of legend, when man and dragon shared this world. You decide when you take up the challenge of the Dragon Tarot.

-- Kelvin Black, on Tarot Canada

$21.95
Halloween Tarot
Halloween Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HALLOWEEN TAROT:

I need to begin this review by saying that Halloween is a favorite holiday of mine. I like dark and creepy things. A tarot designed with Halloween images had to live up to an expectation of what I see in the holiday -- the fun and the serious, the comic and the dark; a combination of horror and delight; a mixing of old history and new customs. Plus, it needed to speak to me, through its art and words, and most importantly still, through the readings done with the cards. The artist and the author are both also great fans of Halloween, and they have indeed created a terrific tarot deck in honor of this black and orange holiday. The set exceeded my expectations of it, despite my quirky requirements.

All of the artwork is consistently very good, and the deck feels complete. After I read the book and studied the cards, I was ready to do some actual tarot work. Not to sound overly skeptical, but I wondered how the images would speak to me in readings, as they are designed around Halloween. Generally I don't do very in-depth readings when I first try out new decks. I give them a chance to sort of introduce themselves to me. But, for whatever reason, I felt moved to go into some detailed queries with these cards, and was surprised to see very accurate and somewhat uncanny results. The Halloween images did not get in the way of reading the cards in a traditional manner, in fact, they spoke to me as well as any other tarot.

The set obviously won't appeal to everyone. Not everyone likes Halloween, or will like the style of the artwork. Also, it's a dark deck -- in color, and features many skulls and spooky grinning faces. But, I do highly recommend the set to anyone who feels drawn to it, enjoys Halloween, or even just wants a very fun but useful deck for Halloween parties.

-- Nellie Levine, on Illumination Tarot


I love Hallows. I love the depth of magic that is woven as the veil thins and the serious, introspective work that is commonly undertaken at Samhain. I love the festivities of Halloween -- the costumes and candy and the prominent and often positive images of witches, black cats, cauldrons, and brooms. Not surprisingly then, I loved The Halloween Tarot, by Karin Lee and Kipling West. This deck is a Rider-Waite-Smith clone, in that the illustrations are closely based on the RWS deck, but the traditional images have been halloweenified. The Emperor and Empress become Frankenstein and the Bride of Frankenstein and the suits of pentacles, swords, wands, and cups are transformed into pumpkins, bats, imps, and ghosts respectively. The traditional aspects of the cards will appeal to readers who want to work with RWS, while the clever, colorful, fun, Halloweeny aspects will draw readers who dislike RWS or consider the images to be archaic, rigid, or flat. Unlike the RWS deck, every Halloween card includes a single black cat. This cat, whose image graces the reversible backs of the cards, begins the Major Arcana as the Fool's companion and ends up as the center of The World. The cat's presence unifies the deck, pulling together this diverse collection of Halloween lore, and the cat's animated facial expressions provide another layer to the cards' imagery.

It captures the fun of Halloween without the darkness or seriousness of Samhain. Even the Death card, often the most frightening image in a tarot deck, is portrayed as a smiling skeleton who is lovingly watering a patch of jack-o-lanterns. Karin Lee explains that "rather than portraying Death as mysterious and threatening, this card reminds us that death is part of the natural process of life. I highly recommend this deck and book set for what it is-a RWS deck with a twist and a fun portrayal of the secular side of Hallows.

-- Chava, on Matrifocus.com


This is a real Tarot deck with carefully thought out imagery based on the familiar Rider-Waite pack. It has been delightfully "twisted, turned, and tweaked" to create a colorful, humorous, and fun-filled Halloween deck. The brief little pamphlet that comes inside the box with the "deck only" set explains that the imagery chosen by artist Kipling West incorporates not only old-time Halloween archetypes but characters from old horror movies, circus images and from the German-made Vegetable People that were popular decorations in America in the 1920s and can be seen on vintage Halloween postcards. Mixed in with the Halloween symbols is a blend of ancient Greek, Egyptian, Hindu, Chaldean and biblical imagery. Kipling West knows her Tarot and she clearly loves Halloween as I do. This deck is so much fun, the illustrations so bright and colorful and detailed that I think most any Tarot lover will find it enjoyable. It is perfect for light-hearted, less serious readings that might be done at parties but can also be used by the serious student to broaden one's understanding of the traditional Tarot symbols. While the symbolism on the Court cards and the Major Arcana is very faithful to the Rider-Waite vision it is at the same time enormously creative in working the Halloween symbolism into the cards. The images are all fun and so they are useful for working with people that are merely curious because they do not frighten, however, an experienced reader can easily transpose their own deeper knowledge of the cards onto these loosely veiled images and the deck is satisfactory for serious divination. If you love the fun-filled and slightly freaky American holiday of Halloween with it's orange and black cornucopia of characters and symbols you will adore this deck as I do.

-- Terrie, on Amazon.com

$21.95
Medicine Woman Tarot Deck
Medicine Woman Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE MEDICINE WOMAN TAROT:

These cards read like a dream, the energy just flows through them and the readings that I have given from using these cards are extremely detailed and spiritual. I find the beauty of the art as well as the colors used allows my intuition to float to a higher level than I reach with many other decks. Animal spirits are lightly drawn in the background and become almost real during the reading. The gentleness of the lines in the artwork is wonderful to look at when reading with these cards.

I love the way that Carol Bridges adds the "usual" names of the Major Arcana on the side of the cards since she has changed the names of the majors, it makes it much easier to understand the majors and see her parallels between the traditional meanings and that of the great spirit, mother creator. These cards speak of Indian beliefs, caring for the earth and each other. Using our intuition to see the paths before us, and the nurturing ways of the mother.

I love using these cards and my clients love to look at them as I am reading for them. The images are not scary or negative looking so I find that my clients are more relaxed during their readings. For example, the "devil" card in the traditional tarot is the "trickster" in this deck. The suits are stones/pentacles, pipes/wands, arrows/swords. And bowls/cups. Every card in this deck has a circle on it, in my opinion, representing the circle of life. I recommend this deck to anyone that is interested in the beliefs and ways of the Native American Indians and enjoys a -- simple, yet detailed deck.

-- Adrienne, Aeclectic Tarot


This deck, created by Carol Bridges, is another treasure. The artwork on its own is gorgeous, being simple enough to appeal and be open, but still being detailed enough to convey meaning in an evocative and very inventive way. Every single thing in the cards seems to have meaning of some sort: Even the way the titles of the Major Arcana are written!

To give a brief background to this deck before I got into details however, I shall say that its purpose, other than to be a deck for people to read with, is to help people, both men and women, regain the feminine healing energy that many people in the West are brought up to neglect nowadays. The creator takes pains to reassure that this deck is not specifically aimed at women only, despite its name, which came about due to the idea of the feminine healing energies that we are trying to reclaim.

It becomes apparent after sifting through this deck a couple of times that the images a figures within them are primarily female, and indeed three of the four suits have women as their 'main characters'. However, this should not be misinterpreted as feminist overtones: As mentioned above, this deck is aimed at both men and women, and includes both men and women in its purpose. The images also show tribal settings, but this is not based around a specific tribal culture: Something that surprised me when I received the deck, as I was expecting it to focus on the Native American culture. This deck has focused largely on what the creator calls "tribes of the future", where humanity has blended what can be learned from the past cultures. It shows some tribal scenes which are quite modern: the people in it are wearing modern clothes for instance, and some which are not modern, where perhaps the character is a Shaman, kneeling in his circle with his tools in front of him. It is certainly a refreshing and interesting blend, and one that distinguishes this deck from most others of the same theme.

Overall, this deck is easy to use once it has been explored, and has artwork which I personally find very open, honest, and attractive. The new titles for the Majors offers the reader of this deck a whole new way of looking at the cards, and the stories played out within the Minors are a beautiful way to craft their meanings. A beautiful deck, and one that I'm sure many will benefit from.

-- Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Radiant Rider-Waite® Tarot
Radiant Rider-Waite® Tarot

What customers are saying about Radiant Rider-Waite

The new Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot is the latest offering in a long line of historically accurate decks from Stuart R. Kaplan based upon the illustrations of Pamela Colman Smith. For this very pretty new deck, the artist Virginijus Poshkus was selected to re-color the drawings.

To describe the colouring of these cards as radiant is not an overstatement, as they are indeed shining and glowing, brilliant and luminous, and truly beaming with happiness. The cards have a clean, white border all around the images, with the numbers on the top in Roman numerals for the Major Arcana and spelled out in capital letters on the Minors. The titles and suits are in capital letters, in the same very pleasant typeface, also centered on the bottom of the cards.

The cards themselves have a nice feel, as they are printed on good cardstock, and are plastic-coated and durable. They are easy to handle and shuffle, being sized at 2 3/4" by 4 3/4" overall. The packaging is in a standard size box, printed in complimentary hues of orange and blue to highlight the radiant color values of the cards within, and featuring the Fool and Magician cards from inside. The instructions are familiar, featuring an introduction by Stuart R. Kaplan, and follow the standard format used for all decks from U.S. Games in the Rider-Waite tradition, which is both helpful and convenient for every purchaser of these cards. I was very pleased to be able to add the new Radiant Rider-Waite to my personal collection. Virginijus Poshkus has done an excellent job of radiantly re-coloring the images, which will make them easy to read and use for beginners and the advanced student, and they should soon prove to be a favorite of collectors worldwide.

—Peter Cowen, Aeclectic Tarot


Some people may feel that an "update" to a deck is unnecessary, that too many versions of the same thing amounts to overkill. I often find that new versions do have something to offer, and that this is the case with the Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot.

In the original version of this deck, there is an emphasis on the black outlining of the art, which to me takes away the ability to connect with the cards. The standard Rider-Waite was my first deck, and was almost immediately supplanted by the Morgan-Greer deck, a Rider-Waite clone that I could connect with much more easily.

The Radiant Rider-Waite, had it been my first deck, would have been the deck that I stayed with for professional readings. I like the fact that the intense black lines have been discarded, and the crisp white border with the card number at the top and the title at the bottom. The back of the cards, carrying the image of a starry sky, is also far preferable to the diamond pattern of the standard Rider-Waite deck.

The coloring is much more intense, with more of an orange overtone to the yellows. In some instances (the Fool, for example) there appears to be an aura of light around the figure(s) in the card. You really have to look for this, and I do not feel that it takes away from the ability to use this deck at all.

The Empress ends up with more of an orange sky behind her, but the plant life is distinctly green, rather than the yellowish tone carried by the standard deck. The deletion of the black lines does seem to have affected the facial expressions on the figures in the cards - bringing them out, making them more evident.

The rather gray background of the Hermit becomes an intense blue, which I feel adds rather than detracts from the card. The same holds for the intensifying of the color for the veil behind the figure of Justice. The sun over the mountain behind the figure of Temperance now holds the image of triple crown, which does seem to belong there. The Moon is another card that distinctly benefits from the increased intensity of the coloring of the sky.

The stained glass window behind the figure in the Four of Swords becomes much more of a point of focus, and the little salamander in front of the seated King of Wands has his fifteen seconds of fame.

I find the Radiant Tarot to be a deck well worth adding to my collection, as well as one to offer as a choice of decks for my clients.

— Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


This deck has a close resemblance to another Rider-Waite clone which was also recolorized -- The Universal Waite recolorized by Mary Hanson-Roberts.  The Radiant deck, however, features shades that are richer, deeper, and bolder than the softer pastel hues of the Universal Waite version.

I would recommend the Radiant Rider Tarot to anyone who wants to stay with traditional Tarot, but who finds the colors of the traditional Rider-Waite to be too bland or boring for their personal taste.  Many have disliked the original Rider-Waite deck as being boring or uninspiring, while others don't mind at all.  But now there is another choice to help make tradition more fun, enjoyable, and inspiring.

The Radiant Rider takes the familiar and comforting images of the traditional Rider cards and brings them to life with "radiance."  The recolorization serves to illuminate Pamela Colman Smith's original work.  If you're not in the mood for the traditional Rider-Waite, which may seem too "plain," or you find that you're also not in the mood for the softer colors of the Universal Waite deck . . . then the bolder colors in the Radiant version may be just what you're looking for.

Just as with the Universal version of these traditional cards, this deck presents itself in a whole new light . . . and so, if you've been one to stay away from the traditional Rider-Waite deck due to the coloring used, the Radiant Rider is a good reason to take another look from a fresh perspective.

I know I personally enjoy working with traditional Tarot, even though I also find it fun to venture out with something new quite often.  But the traditional Rider Waite

is how it all started for me . . . and with the Radiant deck now available, it's among my favorites and is favored by many of my clientele in the professional readings I do.

It's just a bright, more colorful . . . and more illuminating experience to read with this traditional deck, which has been updated for modern times.

—Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings

$21.95
Tarot of the Spirit Deck
Tarot of the Spirit Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF THE SPIRIT DECK

$21.95
Tiny Tarot Key Chain
Tiny Tarot Key Chain

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE TINY TAROT KEY CHAIN

 

It’s an itsy bitsy teensy weensy yell…  Wait, no it’s not. However, the Tiny Universal Waite Tarot Keychain is probably the most adorable little thing in the Tarot world.

This charming, petite but complete 78-card deck which is illustrated by Pamela Coleman-Smith and re-colored by Mary Hanson-Roberts measures in at 1 3/8” tall by ¾” wide. The deck and Little White Book are housed in a hard, clear, plastic container that snaps closed and feels pretty secure, but does not “lock” closed. The container has a ball chain – Keychain attached to the outside, which can be used to secure the container to one’s own keychain. The set comes in a cardboard hanging display type of package.

 

The deck is a traditional Rider-Waite-Smith with Courts titled: King, Queen, Knight and Page. The Suits are:  Swords, Wands, Cups and Pentacles. Strength is number VIII and Justice is XI. The softer coloring done by Mary Hanson-Roberts is fresh and appealing. The back of the deck is done in blues and features an eclipse with stars above and below and is reversible friendly.

 

The Sun is the traditional Universal Waite image with a blond, naked toddler carrying an orange flag, sitting a white pony in the foreground, with sunflowers and the Sun in the back ground. The LWB says “Satisfaction, Success, Happiness, Contentment and Security.”

Judgement features a pink and purple winged, blond angel, blowing a trumpet and people rising up from the ground with their arms outstretched. The LWB says “Determination, Outcome, Result, Decision, Promotion, Atonement.”

 

The 10 of Cups shows a family rejoicing under a blue sky and rainbow of 10 cups. The LWB says “Pleasure, Peace, Good family, Honor, Joy, Love, Contentment.”

The deck is not in order when it arrives. The cards themselves are flexible, but there really is not a way to shuffle it due to its size. I would suggest either mixing them around on a smooth surface or dropping the deck in a small bag, shaking it and drawing from the bag.  The cards feel like they may be easy to bend and there are perforation marks on each side.

 

The LWB is a folded strip of paper that measures 9 ¾” long x 1 ½” wide. It features keywords for each of the Major Arcana and the Minor Arcana in suit order. It also covers a “10 Card Spread” which is laid out similar to a Celtic Cross but the positions have a bit of a different meaning.  Once I unfolded the LWB, I did have a challenge folding it back the way it came.

 This deck may not be the best to use as a reading deck for those who have issues with muscle control in their hands or poor vision. 

This deck can be just the thing for those Tarot craft projects. At the Bay Area Tarot Symposium I have witnessed attendees sporting this fashionable deck, made into earrings and necklaces. It could also make a wonderful gift or stocking stuffer for your favorite Tarotist.

The Tiny Universal Waite Tarot Keychain is the perfect size to use as an on the go deck when one doesn’t want to carry a full size deck. It is the ideal size to go on a keychain, in a back-pack, purse or to carry in the glove box.  

 

 

– by Terri Clement, American Tarot Association

$9.95
Sun and Moon Tarot
Sun and Moon Tarot

What customers are saying about Sun and Moon Tarot

Illustrator Vanessa Decort has created a stunning yet simple deck with her Sun And Moon Tarot. On close inspection, there is a richness and complexity that draws you in and lends new, subtle nuances to your tarot readings. Decort describes the deck this way: "The Sun And Moon Tarot considers universal archetypes and cultural symbols, and also incorporates the artist's own personal symbols."

Based on the Thoth deck, it stays true to the titles that Aleister Crowley used (ex: 7 of Pentacles - Failure; Art - Temperance; Princes and Princes rather than Knights and Pages). I've always been somewhat intimidated by the Thoth deck but Decort has taken that influence and infused it with an almost playful, childlike essence. This could be because she has a background as an illustrator for children's books or perhaps she simply wanted to deliver the wisdom of the Thoth deck in a more whimsical and accessible manner. The result is an inviting, fun deck that never loses its Thoth roots.

This is a well-made deck on sturdy card stock with a somewhat matte finish. It felt great in my hands, shuffled well and seemed built to last. This is very important to me as I tend to be hard on my decks through constant use. The back of the deck is a gorgeous black and white mandala - and it's reversible, another small detail that I like.

Each image is framed by white borders with titles (in English) and numbers clearly printed. Colors are bold yet muted. I especially liked the choices for the Minors suits - neutral, earthy tones for Earth; dark grey, burnt sienna and orange flames for Fire; rich midnight blue for Water; and light sky blue for Air. These color schemes make sense and allow the reader to instantly know which suit they are working with before they even glance at the title.

There are strong Kabbalah and alchemy influences throughout the deck - each Major has a Hebrew letter and the elemental symbols appear on every minor. Yogic images are scattered about - fro the OM symbol in the Hermit to the dancing Shiva as the Universe (World)!

The Major Arcana is especially rich with symbols - the yin and yang in the Temperance and the Phoenix in the Death card convey the meanings clearly. Astrological symbols are featured throughout the Majors - for example, the Cancer symbol on the chest of the driver in The Chariot or the ram's heads and lamb (Aries) in the Emperor.

One of the things I liked the best about this deck was the multicultural imagery. Rather than "standard" RWS people, there are all races represented here - black, white, dark haired, redheads and more. This gives the deck a "modern" appeal and I happen to like that as my own personal life is diverse - so seeing this detail made me feel more connected to the deck.

I'm giving this deck two Swords up. It is a unique and interesting deck for any tarot lover's collection.

—Theresa Reed, “The Tarot Lady”

 

 

$21.95
Crystal Visions Tarot
Crystal Visions Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CRYSTAL VISIONS TAROT:

When you open up the Crystal Visions Tarot by fantasy artist Jennifer Galasso, you are entering a different world -- a colorful one filled with crystals, fairies, animals and mystical figures. The artist was inspired by Stevie Nicks' latest CD "Crystal Visions" as well as her interest in crystal balls.

I was enchanted with the vibrant images right away. The artist's color choices are bold and bright yet still ethereal. Purples, scarlet reds, deep indigos and lush greens make this deck a visual feast for the eyes. While the art is fantasy based, it manages to steer away from being too cheesy. Although some of the figures were a bit cartoonish, overall the look is whimsical, romantic and mythical. Based on the standard Rider Waite Smith system, this deck stays almost true to the tradition -- there is an additional card in the deck, giving you 79 cards rather than 78. This extra card is called "The Unknown Card" and when it lands in a reading, it represents something that is "not yet meant to be revealed". The usual Majors are featured and the suits are traditional Cups, Wands, Swords and Pentacles. Court cards are Kings, Queens, Knights and Pages.

Different flowers and animals represent each suit:
Cups: emotions -- water lilies and dragon flies
Swords: intellect and conflict -- ravens and winged creatures
Pentacles: material things and money -- crystals, fruitful trees, wildlife
Wands: creativity -- candles, sprites, dragons

While I enjoyed the art in the Minors, the Majors are the standout part of this deck. My favorites were the Hierophant with the pope sitting on a throne in front of a stained glass window adorned with different religious symbols; the eerie Death card with a ghostly figure standing above a seemingly dead female on a headstone; the mighty Emperor with his ram's mask and The Devil with a playful Pan like figure in the background trying to entice a naked woman who lounging by a tree with an apple in her hand (who is tempting who?) I would recommend this deck to any tarot collector, any fans of fantasy art, younger readers or beginners, as well as anyone who enjoys crystals and faeries. There are no really creepy images, making this deck appropriate for everyone. Two Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady


If you like fantasy art, (and who doesn't?) this deck is a must have for all Tarot deck collectors and readers. It's beautifully illustrated, full of symbology, and evocative. Based on the traditional structure of the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) system of a 78 card deck, you will find the familiar names of the Major Arcana, the Court, and the suits: Wands, Cups, Pentacles, Swords. Included is an added bonus, The Unknown Card. The images are clear in their detail and of sufficient size to see them clearly, and surrounded by a narrow white border. The backs are reversible with a large opalescent sphere in the center which is surrounded by a filigree of rose vines and gems. A pentacle rests in each corner, while a chalice sits in the center at top and bottom.

This beautiful deck would be appropriate for beginners to more advanced readers. I believe I will be spending many delighted hours now and in the future, working with this deck. I’m sure clients will find it as pleasing, if not more so, as I do. If you happen to be on the fence about purchasing this deck, I would recommend it for either yourself or as a gift. It's a win-win!

-- Koneta Bailey, New Paths Tarot


Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to the classic Rider-Waite 78-card system in much of its symbolism, as well as in card and suit names. The luscious card imagery also illustrates the elemental aspects of each suit in order to aid the novice in forming associations with the cards. The Crystal Visions Tarot deck includes 78 cards with an additional unknown card for gazing into future situations that have not yet been revealed, or for exploring issues with deeper insight. The instruction booklet offers both upright and reversed meanings.

The LWB provides an Introduction to the deck along with descriptions and divinatory meanings for each card, including meanings for reversed cards. I am impressed with the amount and value of the material in this LWB. We are given the usual DMs but we are also given insight into the reasoning behind the depiction of the characters on the cards. For example, the description of The World includes: "The characters depicted in this card sits on top of the world in the lotus pose. She appears to be meditating, listening to the hum of the universe. She wears a necklace with the Hindu symbol 'Om' symbolizing the most perfect integration of mind, body and spirit."

The colors on these cards are soft yet vivid. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel. The characters primarily consist of broad-shouldered, well-proportioned men and beautiful, slender women with long, flowing hair. These ethereal images are pleasing to the eye in both color and style. Each suit has its own consistent color scheme, inspired by the element associated with that suit. The Cups cards feature violet and magenta backgrounds; the card titles are black on a pinky lavender bar. Swords cards are indigo and lavender, with the titles written on a lavender-blue bar. Pentacles cards are shades of green and brown, with the titles written on a pale olive-green bar. Wands cards are orange-red and maroon, with the titles written on what I would call a rosy beige bar. The artist's "cool" and "warm" palettes make it easy to recognize the elemental associations in any given spread.

The symbolism on the cards also ties in nicely with elemental associations. For example, the moon appears in in various phases on all of the Cups (Water) cards. Lions and dragons appear on many of the Wands (Fire) cards. Birds or butterflies appear on most of the Swords (Air) cards. Trees and plants dominate the scenes on the Pentacles (Earth) cards.

This deck is likely to appeal to readers who prefer traditional RWS titles and symbolism, but also like to work with cards that feature romantic, fantasy-style art suggestive of the Faerie realm. The level of detail in the images encourages closer study of the cards, yet is not overwhelming. Although the characters are not people you are likely to see in your everyday life, many of them are approachable and engaging. The Unknown Card may not appeal to everyone, but you don't have to use it if you don't like it. I recommend meditating on The Unknown Card before shuffling and drawing cards from this deck for the reading.

-- Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


When I saw images of the Crystal Visions Tarot deck online, I thought it was very pretty, but I just didn't realize how beautiful these cards actually were until I bought them and held them in my hands. For many decks, sample images don't truly do a deck justice, and this one is no exception. Having these cards in my hands to shuffle and read with on an up-close-and-personal basis allowed me to quickly connect -- and to classify this deck among my favorites!

I love the feminine feel of this deck. The imagery is beautiful with rich tones that speak to me on an emotional level. And for those who prefer the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) style of Tarot, the symbolism of the Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to tradition -- from the titles and ordering of the Major Arcana Cards (with Strength as #8 and Justice as #11) ... to the suit names: Cups, Swords, Pentacles, and Wands ... to the traditional court card names: Page, Knight, Queen, and King. while the deck is beautiful to look at, it also renders such beautiful and meaningful energy in reading the cards. As mentioned, this deck really speaks to me on an emotional level. In fact, I quickly made friends with the Crystal Visions Tarot. Doing my first reading with this deck of cards was like connecting with a dear and trusted friend -- even though the cards and I just met during the first week of January 2012. What a lovely way to start my new year in the world of Tarot!

If you are familiar with a RWS deck, you can read the Crystal Visions Tarot straight out of the box with the understanding that there is that extra card in this deck. But for those who are new to the Tarot, I like the way the author and artist has written the 63-page accompanying booklet. It's far better than most LWB's available for a deck. I feel that even a beginner to Tarot could successfully learn Tarot with this deck and the proper books for learning this subject.

A fascinating thing I noticed in this deck is that for the cards that can signify change or rebirth on some level, there are butterflies as part of the symbolism for those cards. In the description of the High Priestess card above, the author tells us that butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and eternal life. I definitely agree, and I would add to that description that butterflies are a symbol of change. Butterflies can show us a "lighter" side of a situation, or can show how thought transforms or changes one's understanding of life and circumstances.

This is a deck that I plan to use frequently since it feels as comfortable to me as the RWS traditional tarot deck, and thus I appreciate the fact that a quality cardstock has been used for this deck. The quality cardstock will allow the Crystal Visions Tarot to stand the test of time with heavy usage.

While I noted that this deck has a feminine feel to me, there are still plenty of male characters contained within the cards. A third of the deck does feature men in the imagery. So it's not a gender biased deck. It just has a soft, gentle, nurturing, and feminine feeling for me. Of course, I don't want to leave you with the impression that this deck is filled with fluff and can't tell it like it is. It definitely can tell the tale of a difficult and challenging story in your life, but at the same time, it's like having a friend by your side who will offer comfort, support, and guidance to get through whatever you're going through. This is the kind of gentle strength that offers empowerment.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone who enjoys the RWS tarot decks, to those who want a gentle deck that has a softer approach (yet still powerful!), and even for those who are just starting with the Tarot. The Crystal Visions Tarot follows RWS tradition in a way that doesn't clone or copy the familiar and well-loved kind of traditional tarot deck, but is still similar enough to immediately resonate with. Collectors will also want to get a copy of this deck, too.

-- Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


To call a tarot deck "different" is definitely vague. The Crystal Visions Tarot is different from many tarot decks I have come across. The cards reflect Galasso’s fantasy style, so those who enjoy fantasy-themed decks will surely like this one. Most of the characters on the cards are women, which is a change from many more traditional tarot decks. Similar to the back, the cards are colored in mostly soft pinks and purples. Each card has a colored rectangle at the bottom with the name of the card, and the background color changes depending on the suit of the card, which is great for the reader. The card backs are simple yet complex, with pentacles in each corner and a circle in the center adorned with flowers. A chalice adorns the center of the long ends of the card. The entire back color is muted and soft, pleasing to the eye and drawing you in. The cards are shiny but not slippery. From an imagery perspective, the deck has some similarities to standard RWS symbols, but it is far from a clone. The Fool in this deck walks off a cliff, but instead of a dog she is accompanied by a number of butterflies.

Galasso's attention to detail is impressive -- the Ace of Cups is one of the most beautiful cards I have ever seen in a tarot deck. One interesting fact is the many of the cards have some kind of reference to air -- a dragonfly, fairy, butterfly, or other winged creature -- which is something you don't often see in tarot decks. I especially liked the Death card, which has Death holding a staff topped with an ankh and the inscription VITA MUTATUR NON TOLLITUR (Life is changed, not taken away) on a tomb. Butterflies reinforce the overall transformation feel of the card. It softened the card but rendered it neither foolish nor powerless, which is a fine line to walk.

This deck also features an additional card, bringing the total number of cards to 79. "The Unknown Card" is explained as an area of the reading which requires further examination -- like a past event, for example -- or that additional steps need to be taken to clarify the bigger picture. I'm not a big fan of extra cards in tarot decks, especially with vague descriptions, so likely I'd use the deck without this one.

While I'm not a fan of reading with fantasy decks generally speaking, I intend to give this one a try. I think my clients will like it, and I know I'll enjoy reading with it, especially when I need a change from RWS clone decks and I'd like something soft yet powerful.

-- John Marani, in ATA Quarterly Journal


The first thing to note about this deck is the beautiful use of color in each card. A major strength of this deck is its ability to create a mood or feeling with each card by such masterful use of color. In the author's own words, the cards have a "vibrant and consistent color scheme, in order to be easily recognizable within a spread."

The artist has consistently portrayed each suit experience through specific colors, crystals, people and other beings. She also assigns elements to each of the four suits in the LWB. The world and its artwork are largely influenced by her work as a fantasy artist and illustrator.

Coins -- the scenes take place in and around tress, lots of greens and yellows, crystals and earth spirits.

Cups -- all scenes take place in same locale and include water lilies, dragonflies, the moon in its different phases, pinks and reddish purples.

Wands -- features lions, unicorns, horses, mountainous terrain and lots of red.

Swords -- the scenes are bleak, cold and snowy with nurds and other winged characters.

One particularly striking card for me is the 4 of Swords. A woman lies at rest on her back in snow that almost covers her, and her arms are crossed as if keeping her only slightly warm. Swords, roses and petals are strewn on the snow around her, and the whole scene is viewed from directly above her. While her face is expressionless, the image itself is felt at first glance. In readings I have found that the characters' faces and eyes do not communicate nearly so much as do the gestalt of colors, symbols and flow of details in each card image. Messages with this deck seem to be toned down in an almost introverted style for a nice and gentle read, much like getting advice from a dreamy friend who, even in anger or elation, remains subdued and calm.

-- John Alan, on Tarot Guild


I love the colors and sense of grace in this deck. The intention with this deck was to create art that was unique, but that would be close enough to traditional imagery to allow new readers to learn the Tarot easily. This is a traditional 78 card deck with one additional card in the Major Arcana, entitled the Unknown Card. It represents an answer that is not yet ready to be revealed. I love decks with an extra card like this”! The Unknown Card can refer to something from the past, or something that is going to happen in the future. The area that this card falls in indicates where steps need to be taken to clarify the big picture. There is also a hint to move forward with an open mind, leaving all bias behind. I loved this card before I even knew what it represented -- my thought was "Yes! Another deck with a card that is 'gifted'!" What an incredible card, with the female figure holding a crystal ball in her left hand. In front of her we see the shadow of an owl. Her whole body posture invites the Seeker to peer into the crystal ball! The artwork is done in a fantasy style, using reds, greens, lavender, and dark brown predominately. There is a sense of gentleness and "otherworldliness" that draws one in, and makes one feel right at home.

This is one deck that if I had my way, I would talk about each and every card! However, that is not allowed, so we will look at the cards that pulled me in the strongest. One of my birth cards is the Hermit, so that is one card that I look at in every deck. If there was a make or break card for me, this would be it. Here we see a lone figure, in a lavender robe, sitting atop a mountain, with a lamp in their left hand. They face the right hand side of the card, generally considered to represent the future. To me, they appear very wistful. The Empress stands in the middle of a garden, wearing a bright red dress, and carrying a triskele scepter in her right hand. She holds a heart-shaped charm. Lush greenery is behind her, as well as a tree with bright green foliage and ripe red fruit. In the upper right hand corner of the card we see beautiful butterflies.

The Lovers shows a man and a woman embracing, with flowers in the right and left hand lower corners. The figures are bound by ties held by two doves.

The Ten of Swords in this deck is one of the least scary, but saddest, images of this card that I have seen in any deck. A female figure is face down in the snow, bloody, with ten swords in her back. She is surrounded by snow and barren trees. The clouds in the sky behind her are attempting to part, indicating that there is hope.

The Eight of Pentacles shows a female figure, standing at her spinning wheel, paying ardent attention to her work. I like this card because she is working outside, with greenery surrounding her and a tree behind her.

The Fool in this deck just carries incredible energy! The figure is a female, with dark, flowing hair. She stands on a precipice, one foot on land and one in the air. There is a trail of butterflies in the air to her right.

I found this deck very easy to read with, and feel that it would be a great deck to offer clients as a choice for their readings. The art alone is gorgeous, and the additional card (the Unknown Card) opens up new avenues for reading. It could simply be taken out of the deck if the reader preferred not to use it.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I felt compelled to look through the cards a second time, and a third. Each time I did, I saw something I hadn't noticed before. There are figures of people in the twisted tree branches, and delicate angels in the clouds. The lush flowers and trees have lovely texture, as do the brilliantly colored dragons. The skies and landscapes are evocative. When I looked closely at each card, I realized this isn't a trite deck. I felt like an old woman who has mistakenly assumed a young, pretty girl to be shallow and stupid. Crystal Visions Tarot is true to Rider Waite Smith structure and interpretation. In many cards, the subtle symbolism honors a wealth of tarot tradition, often in clever ways.

It would take a long time to describe all the cards I love in this deck. They include the Fool, who is female. Butterflies, appropriate for the air correspondence of this card, also surround her. Her dress has red ribbons, one of which has casually wrapped around her leg, giving her the ancient tradition of the Fool's red-striped legs. In the World card we see a large lotus flower cradling a globe on which sits a woman in lotus position. More butterflies here, not elementally appropriate, but acceptable, because they are flying out of her palm chakras. As I mentioned earlier, I question the addition of a seventy-ninth card, entitled The Unknown Card. This card says that the answer is, at present, unknowable. Perhaps we need to look within and find the answer in our own heart. The card is actually quite lovely. It shows a modern Goth-looking young Pagan woman holding a crystal ball. The image is rather different from the rest of the deck. It stands out as a special card, belonging to none of the suits. It is a legitimate tradition in random token divination to use a blank token. It makes sense for Galasso to offer us this option.

That I have already started using Crystal Visions Tarot for professional readings is the highest praise I could give any tarot deck. However, I was initially unsure if I wanted to use the Unknown Card, or use my prerogative to remove it. So far, I have left it in the deck. I must admit, it pops up at very appropriate times.

It has been a while since I've discovered a new deck to add to my short list of professional reading decks. Crystal Visions Tarot is attractive, evocative and easy to understand. Unlike many fantasy art tarot decks, its images are uncomplicated and traditional. Do not be fooled by its youthful energy, Crystal Visions Tarot will give great wisdom and depth. It will be a solid learning and reading deck for anyone from beginners to seasoned professionals.

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


Fantasy artist Galasso has transformed classic tarot imagery into a vibrant tour, through a crystal ball, into a magical world filled with fairies, fantastical creatures, and exotic flowers. Color creates the backdrop against which the story of each card is told. Lyrical and mysterious, the illustrations almost sing.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
Art Through the Eyes of the Soul Oracle
Art Through the Eyes of the Soul Oracle

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT ART THROUGH THE EYES OF THE SOUL ORACLE:

If you enjoy oracle decks -- whether for reading, meditation, or other purposes -- this one is certain to spark your imagination and awaken your intuition. The advice offered on the cards is practical and understandable. I really like the way the artist/author pairs those qualities with art that evokes mystery and mystical realms. There is a keen sense of "as above, so below" or "as within, so without" in these cards. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the Guidebook, which offers much historical, mythological, and spiritual food for thought. Each card has a two-page section in the Guidebook featuring a black-and-white image of the card, an Expanded Meaning for the card, and a description that provides information about the subject and setting of the painting. The cards are not numbered, but the Contents section is arranged alphabetically by card title.

In addition to stunningly gorgeous women and noble-looking men, many of the cards feature animals such as wolves, birds, dolphins, whales, horses, butterflies, deer, a cougar, and a dragon. One of my favorite cards is the last one (alphabetically) in the deck, titled "Wolf Child."

Card faces are bordered in gold "picture frames". Within the frame is an image with a cream-colored text box below it. The text box contains a title in light italic type and words of advice in a "Glastonbury" style font. For example, the card titled "Ariadne and the Stellar Wheel" offers the advice "Weave Your Own Destiny."

Whether cool or warm in tone, the colors in these paintings/cards are deep, vivid, and rich. The subjects are so life-like, it is easy to imagine entering the pictures and engaging in conversation with them or even becoming them. Whether real world or otherworld, the settings draw the viewer in.

-- Zanna Starr, on Tarot Notes


Art Through the Eyes of the Soul Oracle, by Cheryl Yambrach Rose and distributed by U.S. Games, is a wonderful deck for guidance, or a catalyst to empower your own thoughts. Cheryl, a portrait painter, visionary artist and researcher has created a beautiful deck incorporating mythology, art history and her own psychic impressions woven together to form a truly unique oracle that is wonderful to work with. The backs are non-reversible but feature a beautiful painting of a waterfall and maiden peeking from behind the rocks, all done in breathtaking blues and greens.

What struck me while going through the deck was Cheryl's use of color and lifelike portraits that really draw you in and resonate with the keywords that are printed just below each image. The colors include deep blues, lush greens and breathtaking reds and lavenders. I love the characters eyes, which seem so lifelike and almost follow you as you move. This is exactly how Cheryl "tunes into a subject" to receive her psychic impression.

They are bordered with a lovely golden leaf design and the edges are gilded, which adds to the majestic feel of this oracle. The companion book gives the meanings of each card and an expanded interpretation of the keywords found on each card. This is a gorgeous Oracle deck and one worthy of anyone's collection, it is an amazing tool when used with meditation and personal readings. I found it to be quite accurate and very straight to the point and I had a wonderful time working with it!

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie’s Logic


Art Through The Eyes of the Soul is a 52-card oracle deck, accompanied by a 108 page companion book. The presentation is true quality -- the cards and companion book come in a hard cardboard box with a lift off top. The image on the top of the box is that of the Lake, which is also used on the cover of the companion book. On the back of the box is information on the deck, along with a small illustration of the card back. Did I mention that this deck is gilded? This deck would have been awesome without the gilding, but the gilding adds a sense of magic and "otherworldliness" to it. Kudos to the author/illustrator, and kudos to U.S. Games Systems, Inc.!

There is incredible energy in this deck -- I feel that it is a valuable tool for those from all backgrounds, and those of all ages. In these cards we see the world of myth and magic -- it become so real to us that is feels like a parallel world, a parallel reality. This is a wonderful deck for these changing times!

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on the World of Tarot

$25.95
Renaissance Tarot Deck
Renaissance Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Renaissance Tarot

This is one of the most beautiful decks you are likely to find. The Major Arcana are detailed etchings, delicately colored and bordered in gold.

A casual look might make one think that this is a "period" deck, differing from other tarots mainly in the lavish Renaissance costumes shown on the cards. However, it is much more. The artist is a student of art history, in particular the Italian Renaissance, in which the very first tarot decks were produced. This deck captures something of the spirit of those original tarots, in which the Major Arcana were presented as classic, allegorical designs. We've become accustomed to tarot designs laden with 19th-century occult symbolism; this deck offers a refreshing taste of a different kind of tarot, one whose message is open to anyone with imagination and an appreciation of the language of art.

There are many references to Greek and Roman mythology in these cards, as well as medieval folklore and philosophy. So there is a lot of symbolic richness here, although it draws from somewhat different sources than many other decks. For this reason, it is a good idea to buy this deck along with the book, which explains the cultural context of the imagery in great detail, with lots of illustrations from art history.

I have found this to be a reliable and often stunningly powerful reading deck. Perhaps because the artist has studied so many centuries of western art with an eye for recognizing the tarot archetypes wherever they appear, these cards seem to capture the essential ingredients of the human condition with force and clarity. The suit cards in this deck require a little extra effort, however, being more reserved in dramatic content than those in many other decks.

This is a beautiful, powerful deck. Because its inspiration comes from the early Italian tarot tradition, rather than the occult systems of more recent times, I strongly recommend it be purchased along with the companion book, rather than trying to use it with concepts meant for a different sort of deck.

—Tom Waters, co-author (with Mary Greer) of Understanding the Tarot Court


I love the colors and symbols of this deck. When I first saw it I was amazed by the details of this lovely deck. The quality of the drawing and the evocative imagery made me want to use it as my primary deck. I have received many strong readings with this deck, and the questioners are happy afterward. Mr. Williams has a special way of drawing the male and female figure to capture the animus of their spirit. The archetypes are strongly engrained in our collective psyche and the words easily flow from the tableau.

—  Brad Bernstein-Reppen, Amazon customer


This is one of those decks where scanned images just can't do justice for the cards!  The cards on the Renaissance Tarot are embellished with a gold foil-like coloring in the images that make them shiny and really stand out.  The cards are gorgeous!

The Major Arcana cards of this deck portray figures adorned in elaborate costumes and are titled in both the Italian and English languages.  The author's intention for this deck was make it both traditional and original, which he indicates can be an artistic challenge to depict traditional truths in a fresh style.

The pip cards of this deck remind me of a Marseille-styled deck, featuring the number of suit symbols that correspond to the number of that card.  I would have loved seeing full-color scenes like the Majors portray, but the deck is still beautiful nevertheless.

—Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


Delicately illustrated, with gold embellishments, Brian Williams’ artistry gently hints at illuminated manuscripts while it conveys the power of the tarot symbolism contained within the traditional 78-card deck. Relying on classical mythology and four of the great Italian Renaissance cities, he has made the tarot his own. The characters display uncharacteristic emotion and, sometimes unfettered sexually, to convey the essence of the tarot wisdom.

Ultimately, in this deck, it is the eyes which tell the story. Whether they peer out from the face atop The Tower, from the skeleton in Death, or from the leaves on the flower held by The Priestess, the eyes say it all.

It doesn’t matter if you are new to the tarot or a long-term afficionado, this deck will provide many hours of questioning and pondering. It is sad that Brian Williams will not be able to take us further on the journey he has so elegantly begun.His passing was truly a loss to the world of tarot.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com 
$21.95
Ukiyoe Tarot
Ukiyoe Tarot

What customers are saying about Ukiyoe Tarot

Koji Furuta was hand-picked by tarot guru Stuart Kaplan to merge the world of Japanese Ukiyoe artwork with the traditional 78-card tarot deck. The resulting imagery captures the delicate, yet powerful, Ukiyoe style, while the end product is amazingly modern. Then again, that has always been the strength of Japanese art — spanning the ages.

Ukiyoe is a perfect medium to convey the ancient wisdom of the tarot. The Magician is poised like a samurai, ready to take action.The High Priestess peers out from behind her elaborate makeup and costuming to let querents know that her word is law. The Hierophant gazes sadly at his quizzical protegesJustice looks over her shoulder to make sure no one is being left behind. And a boddhisatva beckons from a heavenly lotus as the gravestones tumble in Judgement.

The more you know about the tarot, the more you will find in each illustration. If tarot is new to you, each card offers much to explore. This lively and intricate deck is a terrific oracle and, of course, it will prove valuable for meditation as well.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com

$21.95