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Celestial Tarot Deck
Celestial Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE CELESTIAL TAROT DECK:

Artist/astrologer Kay Steventon and author/lecturer Brian Clark together have created a stunning blend of the myths and symbols of astronomy with the tool of astrological divination. The mysteries that are the Tarot emerge in a very different manner, one that is unique and empowering. It is a guide to the heavens, as well as a guide to our inner selves.

While this deck follows the traditional structure of the Tarot (the Major Arcana retain their traditional titles, with Strength as VIII and Judgment as XI; the suits are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles; the Court Cards are King, Queen, Prince, and Princess), it is overtly based on the traditions of astronomy, astrology, and mythology.

The twenty-two cards of the Major Arcana are represented by the twelve zodiacal constellations and the ten planets of contemporary astrology. In the Minor Arcana, we encounter what the author terms "extra-zodiacal" constellations. The Minor Arcana us divided into decants, with the thought of adding insight and symbolism to each card. In the Court Cards, the Princesses each embody a season, while the Prince, Queen and King each embody the fixed, mutable, and cardinal signs of each element. The artwork is stunning, and strongly carries the character of fantasy. Toss in astrological and elemental symbology, along with Hebrew letters, and this deck rocks! I loved going through the cards and looking for the symbols and the intricate details. The overall tone is a little dark, as far as coloring goes, with deep blue/lavender backgrounds, with imagery in gold, white, lighter lavender, blues and greens, with some bronze/red. It is very hard for me to pick favorite cards with this deck, as I like so many of them! The Fool certainly stands out: associated with the planet Uranus, the Fool is seen as acting suddenly and unexpectedly. He is shown as a small, naked figure against the night sky, arms up and in an apparent freefall. The lower half of the card appears to be a choppy sea, with the shoulders, head, and upraised arm of a male figure shown in the upper half, against a light lavender background. Celestial Tarot is a deck for those who want to work with astrological associations, or those who are interested in myth. This deck certainly could be used for readings, but it would also work well for meditation and journeying.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


This is a complicated, though breathtaking, deck design. It will probably suit the more astrologically minded among us, and those with a good working understanding of Greek mythology. Each Major Arcana card is given either a planetary or zodiacal attribution. Each suit is assigned to its traditional Element, and each pip also has a mythological figure or a constellation associated with it. The images are generally dictated by sections of the myth in question -- for example, the 9 of Swords is associated with Canis Minor, and the image shows us a dog glancing back over his shoulder. Superimposed upon him is the shape of the constellation named for him, and the astrological symbol of Gemini to indicate separation.

The artist who created this deck is Kay Steventon, who brought us the fantastic Spiral Tarot, working in collaboration with Brian Clark. They have gone on to produce an oracular deck called Ancient Feminine Wisdom. The images in this deck are evocative and almost ethereal. The complexity of symbol incorporated into each card is astonishing, with occult glyphs from the Hebrew alphabet, the Qabalah and other sources all adding insight into the mind of the artist.

The little booklet that accompanies the deck explains extensively about each of the legends, which were incorporated into the design of the cards. Though some of the given interpretations are somewhat unusual I found them complementary to my existing knowledge -- expanding my view of specific cards. For example, the 4 of Pentacles is described thus "With the 4 of Pentacles, Taurus initiates the individual into the awareness of the boundary separating Earth’s sacred and secular spheres by recognizing the distinction between inner values and outer possessions. When this card appears the individual needs to reflect on his or her relationship with the material realm". Whilst not exactly a classic interpretation, it is one which builds a new dimension of understanding.

This is most definitely not a beginner's deck. But for a more experienced user of Tarot I would suggest that, both as a meditation tool and a working deck, it could definitely have a lot to offer. The accompanying booklet is very well written and extensive. If you liked the Spiral Tarot, you'll love this one, especially if you have an interest in astrology and Greek myth.

-- Jan Shepherd, Angel Paths

$21.95
Tarot Deck/Book Set for Dummies® Tarot for the Rest of Us!™
Tarot Deck/Book Set for Dummies® Tarot for the Rest of Us!™

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT DECK/BOOK SET FOR DUMMIES:

"For someone who is curious about the Tarot this is a great introductory book packed with educational and informative information that can provide a solid foundation from which to build upon."

-- Sheila Hall, CTC

$31.95
Whimsical Tarot Deck
Whimsical Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Whimsical Tarot

The Whimsical Tarot is a lot of fun -- although I originally bought it for my children to use, I found myself drawn to some of the really clever imagery. Hanson-Roberts uses traditional fairy tale characters to portray the divinatory meanings of each card. The Major Arcana, in particular, are well chosen, as are the court cards. This is a great deck to use if you're teaching kids the Tarot, or if you just want to expand your own horizons a bit. The artwork is lovely, and the card associations are clearly thought out. Definitely worth buying, if you enjoy Tarot and classic children's stories!

—Patti Wigington, About.com


Drawn by Mary-Hanson Roberts, who also created the art for the Hanson-Roberts Tarot and the Universal Waite Tarot, the Whimsical Tarot is based on fairy tales and nursery rhymes and intended for children and the 'young at heart'.

But it is by no means limited to children. The fairytales are familiar to almost everyone, the simplicity and already associated meaning with the cards helping to make tarot more accessible to a beginner.

Some of the cards make me chuckle, others I find impressive because of the approachable rendering of normally disliked cards. The Devil card, for example, shows a pair of hands controlling a marionette, a puppet on strings. The Death card is Sleeping Beauty.

I adore the backs of the cards. A lilac flower is in a rectangular focus in the center of the card. Surrounded by a mauve border, then a thicker border of yellow Celtic knot work on a turquoise background, it is restful, appropriate for upright or reversed readings, and very pretty.

I highly recommend the Whimsical Tarot as a child's tarot deck; for people who read for children; or for sensitive souls who aren't keen on confronting images on their tarot cards. The Whimsical Tarot gets the message across without being dark, negative or scary.

I also think it is a good beginners deck, as the fairytales used on each card allow the tarot novice to hang the tarot concepts on a framework they are familiar with. Learning seventy-eight different tarot meanings and how to interpret the tarot symbols can very seem daunting, but the Whimsical Tarot's cards are cute and the scenes already familiar. Hanson-Roberts combined traditional fairytales and tarot make a beautifully presented, sweet, and thoroughly whimsical tarot deck.

—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


She sat down and flipped through the deck, her eyes lighting up as the realized that she recognized all the fairytales and stories within each card. She squealed with excitement when the 4 of Swords reminded her of the Princess and the Pea, and she jumped up and down in her seat happily as the Magician bought back the story of Puss in Boots. When she had finished looking through the deck, she handed it back to me, with a grin from ear to ear adorning her face: My Mother appeared to like the deck.

As can be seen from my Mother's reaction, the Whimsical Tarot is aimed at children and the young at heart. The cards are adorned with fairytales, nursery rhymes, and stories that we were told as children, and as such, there are many adults who can use this deck very effectively. The benefits of using fairytales and such to illustrate the meanings of the cards is that nearly everybody is familiar with most of them, and thus can understand the meaning in the card without having to look in any book. Fairytales bring back fond memories of childhood, and those nights on the sofa with your Granny, when she would make you hot chocolate and then read Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm to you until you were too sleepy to stay awake any longer. The attraction of a deck surrounded by, and based upon, these stories is understandable.

This deck is largely traditional: the names of the cards, the suits of the Minors, the ordering of the Majors, and the meanings of the cards are all Rider-Waite traditional. The only thing that differs is the pictures used to illustrate the cards, as these are taken directly from the fairy stories applied to each card. All of the cards are fully illustrated with the gorgeous artwork of Mary Hanson-Roberts. The Court Cards are particularly appealing, all being characters from stories, with the Queen and King usually being from the same story, eg- King and Queen of Pentacles being Maid Marion and Robin Hood. The Pages in this deck are the most interesting I have come across, and certainly the easiest to understand! Instead of showing people, they show objects, which convey the meaning of the card. For instance, the Page of Swords shows a telescope, and the Page of Pentacles shows gold coins, scales, and a tally-chart. This is a great help, especially for young children and beginners, as it is often the Court Cards that are the most difficult to read.

All the fairytales are well chosen and very evocative. Every other deck I have seen which uses fairytales as its theme has failed in that sometimes the chosen fairytales are chosen superficially, for instance, in one deck I found that the Emperor card was represent by the Emperor's New Clothes, which really didn't have anything to do with the meaning at all. With this deck, that's not the case: Every single card's fairytale is chosen for its meaning and significance. That is an achievement within itself I think, and something that this deck deserves praise for.

I love this deck. It is the best one I have seen which is aimed at children, but which also proves to be an excellent deck for adults! Children, beginners, adults who enjoy fairy stories, collectors, and those who like Mary Hanson-Roberts' artwork would all enjoy this deck immensely and learn alot from it. For myself, after using this deck, I found that I could read better in general: the meanings of the cards took on a more imaginative form, and I could apply meanings from the cards to the querent's life very easily. As an introduction to the Tarot, or as a deck for the more advanced reader, this is an absolute treasure.

—Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot has a great richness to it because it is drawing on our knowledge of fairy tales as well as our knowledge of the Tarot. It works well for intuitive readings based on the images which can speak directly to us at a deep level. Although it may look like a children's deck it is suitable for anyone who is happy with an attractive, amusing deck which has more depth to it than appears at first glance. 


—Fairyhedgehog, Aeclectic Tarot


I have recommended this deck to everyone I know interested in Tarot and while at first they read reviews and see the deck and question me, once they USE the deck for the first time, they are hooked! As the author states in her introduction, the images are intended to appeal to our inner child, our earliest memories and our connections to fairy tales and their distinct sense of right and wrong, good and evil. These descriptions, again, seem simplistic and very black and white, and life deals us, like the Tarot, a mixed bag with gray areas, this deck comes through with clear messages and direction. Like our proverbial Knight in Shining Armor, the message in a spread heralds in with ease and in a manner that allow for deeper reflection as you view the images on the cards.

The artwork in this deck cannot be complimented enough. The images perfectly match the descriptions. Ms. Morrison, in her introduction, compliments Ms. Hanson-Roberts with seeing within her own mind and having an innate understanding of her ideas. This is true for this deck like no other I have encountered. There is a perfect congruity between image and word.

—Kate Robinson, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot approaches the reading of cards from a completely different aspect -- by associating with childhood images and fairy tales. This deck allows us to connect with our "inner child". Although the name may suggest this is a less than serious deck, this deck is a very valuable tool in discovering our inner selves and helping us reconnect with those simple things that give us joy.

The images on the cards do not obviously correspond with the imagery from our experiences with the Rider-Waite style of decks. Gone are the confusing "Quabalah mystery" symbolism that we pondered and studied in order to interpret the meanings of those older decks. This is the use of simple and obvious imagery that gives us instant insight into the meaning of the cards.

The images are drawn from well-known fairy tales and are familiar to just about anyone. The artwork of Mary Hanson-Robert is clean. She gives us very colorful images that attract attention but are not obtrusive. The artwork is not distracting, but is lovely to sit and reflect upon.

As we explore the deck, we find some familiar tarot references. We do have a Major Arcana comprised of 22 cards, all clearly marked with the number of the card in its order, and the name of the card. There is no mistaking the card's association. The Fool - 0 - is the scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz. If you look at the tarot as a personal journey of the one who begins as a fool, this association is very obvious. We have the symbolism of the yellow brick road, we have Toto and so much more. The Magician is Puss in Boots, the High Priestess is the Fairy Godmother. There are some very interesting associations, as with The Emperor being Father Christmas, the Old Woman in the Shoe for the Empress, Judgment using The Cricket from Pinnochio, Glinda for The World, "Goldilocks being discovered" as Justice. The images are so obvious in some instances, yet they challenge you to use your own judgment and personal insights.

I also find myself drawing on my own knowledge of the tarot and associations when I am using this deck. While someone who is not familiar with the traditional meanings of the tarot will find this a very easy and fun deck to use, those of us who are trained in the traditional meanings will not find this "foreign" as there are familiar associations here. When we look at the "Two of Cups", the traditional meaning being a lesser "Lovers" card, it's association is still retained with the story of the "Owl and the Kitty Cat", so we are not totally out of familiar grounds. Pentacles still retains its meaning of material matters while cups still reflects inner emotions. The "Ten of Swords", a card of chaos and mistakes, shows the story of Humpty Dumpty falling off the wall. The traditional meanings are not told in the mysterious symbolism but in very obvious and well thought through imagery.

The small details on the cards not only attract attention but allow special reflection and a good look at one's inner self. And these special touches make this a remarkable deck. I love this deck for personal contemplation. I have also used this deck for clients who wanted to examine their own personal feelings and issues and it has provided much insight. It works as well with clients as it does with personal readings.

I would also like to suggest that if you have a youngster who is interested in tarot cards and readings, that this would make a perfect first deck. As our children watch us using the cards, they will also want to explore the path with you, as all children look to their parents for guidance. This deck is so perfect for the younger apprentice that I couldn't think of any deck more perfect for the "almost teenager" or the "First Deck" gifting. If you are looking for something that is perfect for a holiday gift, or someone just starting, or the "first deck" give this deck a viewing and see if you don't agree this could be the deck for you.

—Margaret Foster, Amazon customer

$21.95
Tarot Margarete Petersen
Tarot Margarete Petersen

What customers are saying about Margaret Petersen Tarot

Margarete Petersen is a Berlin based painter who has also spent time in Bavaria and Switzerland. She began painting Tarot cards (and Tarot based images) in 1979. Her artwork in this deck is extremely abstract ... often not following traditional imagery/symbolism. The trick to reading with these cards is that you need to back away ... to create a space between the cards and yourself ... and allow the images to come to you. The longer you look at the cards, the more images you will see.

The 78-card deck and accompanying LWB (Little White Book) come as a set in a sturdy box with a lift-off top. The box is a light, light gray, with elegant gold print. The central part of the card The Fool in printed on the top of the box, in a circular, vignette format, with a silver border on the right hand side, and a gold border on the left hand side.

The booklet (3 3/4" by 5 3/8") is 78 pages, and bound. In her foreword, Luisa Francia describes the drafts of early versions of Petersen's cards that came into her possession, and how they differed from the final cards. As those who follow the process of any deck may well realize, sometimes our personal preferences are not the ones that make the final cut! She also makes a very important point in that Peterson is quite good at working with subtle energies, and being able to describe the interplay between energy and matter. With Petersen, and Petersen's sister, Elizabeth, Francia undertook her first Tarot experiments and trance journeys.

In her introduction, Petersen speaks of being very much "at home" in the worlds of myth and fairy tales. Her initial encounter with the Tarot in 1979 reopened a world that had been discouraged in her childhood. She was touched by the symbolic language encoded in the cards of the Tarot. Beginning with the imagery of the Waite-Smith Tarot, she began to look for other images, and other levels of meaning.

The cards are presented without scans, and without keywords/meanings. The meat of the card is presented through a poetic interpretation for the Major Arcana, which is seen as connecting us with story and myth. The Court Cards are presented as speaking for themselves, and of their relationship to other family members, and as representing the "social web" of life. The Pips (numbered cards) are representative of our actions/reactions in the physical world. Each element is described in terms of how is appears on the Physical Level, the Mental-Psychic Level, and the Relationship level. Also given are the boundaries that each number represents. At the end of the book is a short ... two page ... section on reading the Tarot. No spreads are presented. The cards themselves are 3 3/4" by 5 1/2", which do present a problem for those with smaller hands. They are of good quality, card stock with a matte finish. The backs have an orange-based swirling pattern, such that they could not be differentiated in the upright or reversed positions. The faces of the cards have a light gray border, with the card Title across the bottom and the card number, in Roman Numerals, across the top (for the Majors), Title and Suit (for the Court Cards) or Number (in text) and Suit (for the Pips) in dark gray across the bottom of the card.

Some of the Major Arcana have been retitled: The Magician/Magic, The Charioteer/Chariotess, The Hermit/The Crone, The Hanged Man/Trial, Temperance/Mediatrix, and Judgment/Renewal. The Court Cards are Mother, Father, Daughter, and Son. The suits are Flames, Cups, Feathers, and Coins.

While this is definitely an art deck, with its modernistic, futuristic quality, but it is also a deck that opens the reader to the world of spirit. The deck took twenty-two years to complete, and was her whole world during that time.

Some of the cards from the Major Arcana, such as the Fool, The High Priestess, Strength, Trial, the Tower, the Moon, and the World carry fairly traditional imagery, even though they are presented in a modernistic style. Some, such as Magic (the Magician, which is presented as a mask), the Empress (the Emperor, the Hierophant, the Lovers, the Mediatrix (Temperance, which is presented as walking between the worlds of alchemical transformation), the Devil, the Star, and Renewal (Judgment) are quite abstract.

The suit of Flames is done predominately in shades of red, orange and yellow. The suit of Cups is done in pastel blues, grays, and yellows. The suit of Feathers is done in shades of blue, white and purple, with a hint of orange/red. The suit of Coins is done in shades of gold with a hind of blue/gray, orange and brown.

This is definitely not a beginners’ deck. It is a deck where symbols appear where they have never appeared before, and the cards have to be read "in the moment". Look for figures and angles to appear the longer that you look at the card. This is a great deck to read with, but not one that I would use for readings for others unless they chose the deck themselves for the reading. It is a wonderful addition for a collector, or for someone who appreciates art decks. It is also very high on my scale of life for use in meditation and journeying.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


When I first opened this deck I thought… there are no images on most of these cards! Just muted blurs of colours and textures. How in the world could I read with these cards and get any meaning out of them, after all, the words are in German!I sat with the cards and threw my first layout. I allowed the cards to 'flow' from the deck and into the layout. Sitting quietly, grounded and ready to read, I picked up the first card.

Oh my Goddess, there were images within those swirls of colours! I didn't see them at first but there they were. Changing and 'flowing' before me. I immediately became completely enthralled with this deck. I looked forward to my nightly routine of throwing the cards and discovering what insight they wished to share! I found the readings to be very emotional and insightful. Touching deeply on what was happening now as well as shining light on tomorrow. The intensity of these readings were surprising and became something I eagerly looked forward to each evening.

I was fortunate enough to have someone who speaks German in my life and they translated the Minor Arcana for me but I decided to let the book stay foreign to me… I enjoyed the relationship I was creating with them and found the unknowingness of Margarete's intentions to be freeing… it opened me to the 'flow' in a way I truly enjoy. Usually once I finish reviewing a deck it goes onto the bookshelf in my living room while I move onto another. This one is staying by my side! It lights the journey of my 'flow' like no other deck I've used and has quickly become another one of my personal favorites.

—Aleesha Stephenson, Timeless Spirit Magazine

$39.95
Art of Life
Art of Life

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT ART OF LIFE TAROT:

As I have confessed before, I am a quotaholic: I am powerless over a good quote. And what better way to have a quote a day to fulfill my quota than The Art of Life Tarot Deck by Charlene Livingstone. This stunning deck combines three of my passions: art, tarot and quotes, but what really impressed me the most was the packaging. The cards come in a box where the lid folds up into a nifty little pop up frame, complete with a clear plastic cover, making this a wonderful accoutrement for your desk or altar.

The Art of Life can be used for traditional tarot readings but for me works best as my daily affirmation. The Art of Life Tarot is indeed a treasure and will be treasured for generations to come.

-- Kayla Garnet Rose, on The Enchanted World of Rambling Rose


The Art of Life Tarot is beautiful. And it can hardly help but be given that it's made up of 78 art masterpieces. Charlene Livingstone has taken her experience as an art historian and used it to curate an absolutely gorgeous fine art Tarot. Renoir, Klimt, Van Gogh, Cezanne, and da Vinci are just a few of the many masters represented. She's also included quotes on each card from the greats of philosophy and literature, people like Emerson, Thoreau, Plato, and Lao-tsu. As a mini art-gallery with inspirational commentary, these cards are amazing. The fact that they're structured as a Tarot deck makes them even better.

Though not at all a standard RWS deck, the paintings Livingstone chose to represent each card loosely follow the general themes of the Golden Dawn tradition. And many, in fact, are very clearly RWS inspired. For instance, Gauguin's portrait Van Gogh Painting Sunflowers is a beautiful depiction of the traditional 8 of Pentacles, as is Raphael's Pope Leo X with Two Cardinals for the Hierophant.

Though an understanding of the RWS or Golden Dawn Tarot systems will likely add insight to your readings with this deck, it's not at all necessary. These cards stand alone, both metaphorically, and quite literally. One of the especially nice things about the Art of Life is its oversized cards and the beautiful box they come in. The box allows you to display a card as if it were a little framed painting on an easel. It’s pretty cute, and perfect for the contemplation of a single card and its message.

This is a really nice deck. I recommend it to Tarot reading art fans, bibliomancers, and collectors alike. It's not just a Tarot deck, it's a magical fine art collection in a box.

-- Georgiana Boehnke, on The Tarot Room


What a delightful tarot, appealing to the eye with colorful classic art, and adding as well poignant quotes and combining both within the classic tarot structure. I’ve enjoyed the Art of Life tarot, to ponder meanings that are layered by combining great paintings with compelling bits of literature. The Art of Life Tarot comes in a very clever box; the top lid slides upward and locks into a slot, leaving the plastic see-through front as a ready display easel for whichever card one wants to gaze on…voilà la! The box becomes a miniature gallery.

            The little white book gives all the meanings for (upright) cards of the standard 78 card tarot, and as mentioned above adds the image of a notable painting with an apt quote to match. Each card has the tarot title on the top, a color art image that covers most of the card and below is a quote. For example the Eight of Cups has “A Son of His Father” by N.C. Wyeth; the depicted painting shows a young man with suitcase, leaving his home, while what appears to be his mother, head down, with a handkerchief over her mouth. And the quote reads, “In each loss there is a gain, as in every gain there is a loss. And with each ending comes a new beginning.” Thus both the artwork and the quote reinforce the booklet meaning for the eight of cups (page 16): “change, loss, leaving something behind.”

            So there is much to discovery here, in the linkage of great art with tarot and life experience symbolism. Each adds to the meaning of the other, and much of the art is from a time gone by, so gazing into the soul of the subject is traveling with one’s mind through time and space. The box measures 4 5/8 x 6 1/8 x 1 5/8 inches, and the deck of cards stack to just under one inch.

            The Art of Life cards are fair size, larger than a Vegas deck; they measure 3 ½ x 5 inches and have rounded corners. The card backs are uniformly one image, the “Tree of Life” painting by Gustav Klimt. While technically not symmetrical on the vertical or horizontal axis, the nature of the image does not distract from shuffling where one might otherwise be tempted to track whether the card would end upright when turned over. The 32 page booklet has a few black and white images and offers a fun new spread of five cards—the Creativity Spread. I’ve done that spread and Celtic cross and single draws and all worked well for me with this deck.

            I’d recommend the Art of Life Tarot not only for art lovers but also for those who wish to add another layer to their tarot study; the numinous images and thoughtful quotes enhance the self-reflective element of using the tarot. Well done!

—Thomas Freese, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor and Board Certified, Registered Art Therapist.
$17.95
Kuan Yin Oracle
Kuan Yin Oracle

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT KUAN YIN ORACLE

The Kuan Yn is a gorgeous new deck illustrated by Zeng Hao, with the accompanying book written by Alana Fairchild. This beautiful collaboration resulted in a deck and book set that is as lovely a treat on the eyes as it is for the spirit.

The cards are all so beautiful, elegant, graceful, peaceful and feminine.  My favorite card is the Lotus Throne (above). When I saw the image of this card online, I had to have this deck. It is beyond gorgeous. I want to be her.

I was blown away with how accurately this deck matched my daily life experiences. For a couple weeks, I pulled a single daily card, and it never failed to align, with minute detail, with what was going on for me that day. The deck reads very gracefully, and the spiritual messages are gentle and empowering. The cards, gorgeous as they are, don't lend themselves to intuitive readings on their own, as they are all very alike. So the book is invaluable for this deck to work its magic. You really do need to learn the meaning behind each card.

This deck has not failed to give me the exact message I need to hear on any given day. Every time I draw a card, I am amazed at how it seems to be written just for me. It has been like having a divine friend with me, knowing exactly where I am and where I want to go and what I need to do, guiding and encouraging me along the way.

The 144-page book that accompanies this deck is wonderful. Alana Fairchild has a lovely voice, and was the perfect author for this set. The author's voice is so comforting, it's as though she channeled Kuan Yin's compassionate and loving spirit while writing the book. The passages guide you lovingly through the difficult times as well as the blessed. You can really feel the divine energy coming through her words. When you read the message, you feel loved, which is an amazing testimony to the power of the author's voice.

I love this deck! Both the cards and the book simply exude positive feminine energy. The images are exquisite, and the book is marvelous. If you are looking for a deck that will channel the Divine Feminine, look no further.  It's been a really beautiful experience working with these cards and book... it's a set I will cherish.

—Kiki, Tarot Dame Blogspot


Back around July of 2010, I had won an oracle reading at a local health and wellness open house, which I went to and was quite impressed by what I learned about myself and my life's journey. Ironically, at that same reading is when I fell head-over-heels with the specific oracle deck the woman used to read me. I had been following this particular oracle and its author since it was published and to say smitten would be a gross understatement!

The oracle deck boasts 44 incredibly beautiful, intricately detailed and soul capturing cards and comes with a 144-page guide book that explains a little about each card in the deck. Each page also provides meditations, prayers and exercises you can do to help connect with your inner peace, beauty, and awareness.

Kuan Yin IS after all, the goddess of compassion guiding us to love ourselves and reach the Divine Feminine.

Aside from the breathtaking artwork, the thing I really liked about this deck is its size; the cards are larger, which is what I prefer when reading myself or others.  I'm so excited to break this deck in and see what advice and insight Kuan Yin and the Divine Feminine have for me :)

—Kayla, The Eclectic Element

$23.95
The Sacred World Oracle
The Sacred World Oracle

What customers are saying about Sacred World Oracle

          The Sacred World is just the right size for an oracle; it feels good in the hands with slightly rounded corners, and an “as above, so below” quote with a nearly symmetrical image on the back of the cards—depicting four elements within a circle. The cards measure 3 5/8 x 4 5/8 inches, and are just thin enough to easily shuffle. The small box shows the Butterfly card design and the 47-page Little White Booklet includes card meanings. Although reversals are not a part of the interpretations, it does not mean that the unbalanced aspect of each card symbol is not addressed. For example, card 34, the general element Fire, has the following key words, on page 33, “passion, energy, change, make the most of it, but be careful not to burn out.”

            Two card spreads are given, including the intriguing Black Swan, White Swan spread. This five-card spread addresses needs, helpful actions or thoughts, and a “Magic Feather” to focus on a solution. The card artwork is delightful, with the look and wonder of book illustrations. The majority of the figures on the cards are from the animal kingdom, with about ten of the 44 cards showing human or human-like characters. Each card scene is ornately framed to match the four elements and a cartouche-like window at the bottom of the card face allows a quick scan to identify the varying elements in a spread with multiple cards. That is, each little window shows that card element visually; watery waves, red orange fire, blue sky and white clouds, and green vine leaves.

            From dragon to bluebird to crocodile and whale; these are well-loved symbols represented by beloved critters or imaginary creatures. Each card/scene/narrative is enhanced by sumptuous background environment—the bear in the desert southwest, bats in a tangle of tree limbs or glowing fireflies illuminating a midsummer night. The Sacred World Oracle brings varying cultural strands, for Ganesha sits on a lotus blossom in the Elephant Card; Raven is done in the style of the Northwest coastal wood masks; and Dragonfly shows a woman who seems to have stepped out of the Brazilian rainforest.

          The cards, and interpretive wisdom, in this oracle are positive and inspirational without coming off like a Pollyanna. The realistic wisdom blended with mesmerizing, beautiful images would brighten any a reading; take your worries and fears and walk with the Sacred World Oracle. You’ll come through with confidence, awareness and at least the hint of a smile.

—Thomas Freese, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor and Board Certified and             Registered Art Therapist.


Kris Waldherr is one of my favorite artists (and authors!). The quality work keeps on coming with the “Sacred World Oracle”, a 44-card oracle deck based on the four elements (Fire, Water, Air, and Earth), which comes with a 48-page LWB (Little White Booklet).

Waldherr draws from myth, folklore, and nature to celebrate the beauty and diversity of the earth, and to bring gentle guidance into the lives of those that choose to use it. I loved that the point was made in the introduction that the cards both contain the message, and act as the vehicle to bring the reader the message. Our personal experiences act as a frame of reference for interpreting the cards in view of our daily life. We are essentially, according to Waldherr, releasing information that is already deep within our psyche. These sacred cards help tell our sacred stories.

Two spreads are presented – the three-card Past/Present/Future spread, and the four-card Black Swan – White Swan spread.

The deck is broken down into four quadrants, representing the four elements. Each quadrant has animals associated with it:

Quadrant of Earth: Earth, Cat, Dog, Rabbit, Ram, Bear, Lion, Fox, Bull, Snake, Elephant

Quadrant of Water: Water, Whale, Salmon, Turtle, Swan, Dolphin, Crab, Crocodile, Frog, Seal, Carp

Quadrant of Air: Air, Owl, Spider, Dove, Dragonfly, Bat, Peacock, Butterfly, Raven, Bee, Bluebird

Quadrant of Fire: Fire, Firebird, Horse, Dragon, Chimera, Firefly, Scorpion, Falcon, Salamander, Centaur, Phoenix

The cards are presented in the LWB with the card number, name, keywords, and a short paragraph on how to interpret the card.

The cards are 3.6” by 4.6”, which can be a bit awkward for small hands. However, I have small hands, and had no problem working with the cards. The backs have a ¼” white border, surrounding a reddish brown background, with gold icons in the four corners. In the center is a circle, divided into four quadrants to represent the four elements. The circle has a fine gold border. In white letters above and below the circle are the words “ As Above, So Below”. While each quadrant is color coded, I still view the backs as reversible.

The card faces have a ¼” white border, followed by a color-coded border. Earth is a dark green, Water is a light blue, Air is purple, Fire is a brownish-red. An ornate gold border surrounds the imagery, which appears within an arch. The name of the animal depicted, along with the card number (in Roman numerals) is placed in white letters across the bottom of the card. The effect is beautiful – that of looking through a window.

This is a deck that could be used by anyone, of any background, and any age group. It is gentle, bringing wisdom to the reader in a way that it will be accepted.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


I'm a tarot reader and have never had much use for oracle decks. But earlier this year when I was preparing a presentation on accessing your intuition and finding your answers using tarot and oracles, I came across The Sacred World Oracle by Kris Waldherr. I have always liked her artwork--she designed The Goddess Tarot in the late 90s based on her 1996 picture book of goddess images. And I found her online apps to be useful and to show off the beautiful artwork of her cards. For the first time, I became enamored of an oracle deck.

I immediately liked what I saw in the Sacred World Oracle. The artwork was beautiful, the thematic thread of the deck, primarily nature and animal based, conjured up multi-cultural myths and folklore for each animal illustrated, adding deepening layers to the simple images. And like a tarot deck, it was divided into four suits corresponding to the four elements: Earth, Water, Air and Fire. Here was an oracle deck with intriguing possibilities.

The little white book that comes with the deck provides keywords for each card, and a short paragraph that gives a slightly more in-depth analysis for interpretation. My favorite aspect of the LWB is that for each card it suggests appropriate myths, literature, religious stories, fairy tales, artwork, and even ballets from around the world--fodder for further research.

It seems like dolphins and rainbows are requisite images for oracle decks, and this deck does not disappoint. Centered on card XVII, Dolphin in the Water suit, is a dolphin, breaching out of waves that crash against hull-crushing rocks. His graceful curve and strong tail indicate that he is just playing and can rocket away from the rough water at any time. His friend in the distance leaps up toward a rainbow that reflects the top arch of the card border. This card is perhaps the definitive card of the deck--it uses what I've come to expect as standard oracle imagery, but by placing the friendly dolphin in a challenging position, it gives us an example of how to honor difficulty in our lives, transforming it into a game with the rainbow promise that nothing is too great a challenge.

All of the imagery is gorgeous, but a favorite is XXII, Carp, also in the Water suit. The shades of orange and gold lend richness to this card, which symbolizes financial prosperity. The open-mouthed carp twists in the currents of a shallow, clear stream, broken by occasional rocks and tall grasses. Dragonflies dart in and out. An old, gnarled oak branch adorned with blazing fall leaves cuts across the frame of the image, deepening the perspective.

There are four cards that are analogous to the Aces of the tarot deck. The first card of each suit exemplifies the element involved. I, Earth shows a landscape extending from an ancient, thick trunked tree in the foreground, through hills and valleys into tall mountains in the distance. The colors are greens, grays and browns. Tree tops take the shape of bears and mountains reveal crouching cats. In XII, Water, shadowy marine flora wave in the sparkling currents of the blue and green depths. Contemplation of the image brings the outlines of seals, and perhaps other creatures lurk in the dark deep as well. XXIII, Air shows dim storm clouds and bright lightning. One of the clouds morphs into the strong wings and noble head of an eagle. Flaming orange and yellow mythological beasts--dragon, phoenix and chimera--form the wildfire that crackles through the red and brown prairie grasses and pines in XXXIV, Fire.

Even though this deck functions as a standard oracle, to be read intuitively or via the keywords provided in the LWB, the division of the deck into four suits and the addition of cards that represent the essence of each element opens up numerous possibilities for reading. Laying out multiple cards, you can take note of whether there is a preponderance of a suit--for instance, many fire cards would indicate the need for energy and change, whereas a majority of earth cards would suggest that your goals are being manifest.

This deck hasn't converted me to oracle decks, but it certainly is one of the most intriguing, not to mention beautiful oracles I've seen.

—Joy Vernon

$16.95
Mother Mary Oracle
Mother Mary Oracle

What customers are saying about Mother Mary Oracle

This is a treasure of wisdom by Alana Fairchild, and the paintings by Shiloh Sophia McCloud representative of her large paintings are beautiful. This is a very special collaboration between these two creative women.

Cate, Amazon customer


The cards from the Mother Mary Oracle: Protection Miracles & Grace of the Holy Mother are absolutely beautiful. I happen to love Mother Mary and the messages in the cards you draw, are right on.

—C. Davis, Amazon customer

$23.95
The Winged Enchantment Oracle
The Winged Enchantment Oracle

What customers are saying about Winged Enchantment Oracle

Tarot superstar Lisa Hunt has joined forces with Lesley Morrison to merge the human spirit with nature’s winged spirits. Her 39 subtlety dynamic watercolors pay homage to the creatures sometimes referred to as the messengers of God.

Whether you use the cards for divination, meditation, or just enjoy the beauty of the paintings, these cards will prove uplifting and inspirational. The companion booklet by Lesley Morrison is beautifully written and explores the metaphor of bird as elevated human spirit poetically but with a clear eye. Each bird represented has it own haiku-like heralding statement (“You are presence. You are survival. You are bold ambition. You are Blue Jay.”)

From condor to hummingbird, the strength of each unique bird is highlighted in both word and paint. This deck will take you anywhere you are ready to go.

—Anna, TarotWise.com


Each card in this deck is associated with a particular bird so by choosing cards we can use the energy of that bird to help us resolve challenges or to get daily advice.  I love the idea of our ideas taking flight!  The author, Lesley Morrison links the bird image to ascension or otherworldly escapades, the fledgling to the master is a wonderful way to think of life.

There is something about birds that both fascinates and repels me at the same time.  This deck has been a wonderful experience for getting to know our bird friends and tapping into the wisdom they carry. Lisa Hunt’s artwork has made me see birds in a very different light-and I hope you will find this deck as interesting as I have.

I recommend the Winged Enchantment Oracle Deck to anyone who has an interest in Nature, Shape-Shifting, Birds, Lisa Hunt’s Art and to those who like to capture the magic of nature in a reading.  This deck allows your intuition and imagination to go wild with possibilities and that’s never a bad thing.  For me the descriptions on the cards read like an intention or prayer.  I like this idea! The Bird In Flight Spread looks really, really interesting and I can’t wait to try it out!

—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine


Birds and their magic are rooted in the collective unconscious, from pop culture’s Maleficent and the Mockingjay of The Hunger Games to the Pagan resurgence of the Morrigan. So it’s fitting that the language and wisdom of birds has been shaped into an oracle deck, with the teachings of each bird an opportunity for journeying, growth and ascension.

In Lesley Morrison’s introduction to the deck she describes the soul taking its first steps toward self knowledge as being like a baby bird: “awkward, stumbling, and rather more partial to the safety of the nest”, with the potentially arduous adventure of flight ahead – self development – often being described in myth as guided by a bird of some kind.

The 39 oracle cards feature eagles and starlings, condors and robins; there is a breadth of garden birds represented as well as birds of prey and ducks, geese, peacocks and parrots. Each bird is described in terms of its spiritual significance, with keywords at the bottom of the page, and the 48-page accompanying booklet features a few suggested spreads for the cards, albeit fairly generic apart from the Bird of Flight spread at the end which I thought was original and appropriate for the oracle as a whole.

Lisa Hunt’s Native American-inspired illustrations are utterly beautiful and have a depth of detail and a mastery of colour that makes these cards beautiful things in their own right, and I’m pleased that the cards themselves are large format enough to let the artwork shine. I was surprised how insightful the cards actually were, in use – coming to them cold and looking at the booklet I thought they might be insubstantial, but I found they supplemented tarot well and worked especially well for overall year readings, meditations or insight into deep motivations and approaches.

—Anna McKerrow, Pagan Dawn Magazine

$21.95
Angel Inspiration Deck
Angel Inspiration Deck

 

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE ANGEL INSPIRATION DECK

Beautiful Deck. It doesn't have gold edges nor a huge guide book. I loved it because it was to the point. It is not sugar coated. It is about "Angels" and I did find it inspiring.

Cyn, Amazon customer

$21.95
Pixie’s Astounding Lenormand
Pixie’s Astounding Lenormand
WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT PIXIE'S LENORMAND
 
Comprised of illustrations from the Rider-Waite tarot and “The Green Sheaf”, this 36-card petit Lenormand pays homage to Pamela Colman Smith. It is fundamentally a series of collages pieced together from Smith’s artwork. The pieces of the Rider-Waite cards add layers of meaning to the simple Lenormand images.

On the surface it’s a series of images which trigger intuitive information in the reader. For those who are familiar with Smith’s work, each card is a little mystery to be solved and built upon.

Fun, thought-provoking, and already a sensation on the web, this small deck in its metal container is a treat for beginners and seasoned diviners alike.
—Anna, Tarotwise.com

My go to tarot deck has always been The Rider Waite Smith. When I first got into Lenormand ,I paid a high price on Ebay for Edmund Zebrowskis self published Pixies Astounding Lenormand. I didn't use it much because it cost so much. When I heard US Games published it, I had to have it. The artwork is taken from The Rider tarot and The Golden Vanity. The LWB is great. It's actually a bit more than most would call a LWB. It explains each card, it's energy and where in her artwork it was taken from. It's great for beginners and experienced Readers. Now I can put the self published one up just to look at. Also it comes in a little metal box, which I love.
—Dawn Donivan, Amazon customer

Pamela Coleman Smith affectionately known as Pixie is without doubt the most influential illustrator of tarot decks. Ever. Her idiosyncratic illustrations of the Minor Arcana in the Rider-Waite-Smith deck (as it is now commonly referred to) single-handedly revolutionized the tarot, and ushered in the age of the fully illustrated 78 card deck. During her lifetime Pixie did not illustrate any other divination decks beside the Rider-Waite-Smith; Lenormand was not, at the time, particularly popular nor was it (or is it) considered to be the repository of esoteric, occult, and magical knowledge that tarot is. Currently interest in Lenormand and other non-tarot divination decks is on the rise. Edmond Zebrowski has taken elements from the Rider-Waite-smith deck as well as other illustrations by Pamela Coleman Smith and fused them into a charming Lenormand deck. 
 
Pixie's Astounding Lenormand is a standard 36 card deck with no extras. It comes packaged in a small metal tin, with liftoff lid, painted with scenes from the deck, roses, and publisher information. The deck is accompanied by a small 129-page guidebook. Being a product of U.S. Games Systems the quality of the cards is virtually guaranteed. The cards are quite small, 57 x 89mm, as befitting traditional Lenormand decks, and very easy to handle. The card stock is excellent – firm and quite flexible, but not flimsy. The finish is low sheen and smooth with out being slippery – the cards do not stick together or clump, but have an easy flow when shuffled. 
The print quality is excellent – the images are clearly defined with crisp, clean lines and true colours. The palette is a direct reflection of PCS’s original colour scheme which is restrained and elegant – pale blues and greens, powdery teal, buttery yellow, sandy tan, burgundy, blood red, and faded slate predominate. 
 
The illustrations themselves are faithful reproductions of Pamela Coleman Smith’s lovely, old-fashioned images... Edmond Zebrowski has taken many of the minor players and mis-en-scene from the RWS deck and re-focused our attention on them by placing them as central images. Not only has the artist successfully pastiched or collaged elements of Pixie’s illustrations but the tiniest details such as her chiaroscuro techniques have been retained. The print on the back of the deck, a single rose on a blue background, is not reversible. 
 
The guidebook although small is full of information that is helpful to both the novice and experienced user. The Introduction explains the origins of the deck, as well as a few tips on how to read the cards. Each card is given 8 points of information: 
Card Energy – whether the card is positive, negative, or neutral.
Keywords – fundamental descriptors of the card’s characteristics.
Full Meaning – a detailed explanation of the card’s divinatory meaning.
Love – an interpretation for a 'Love 'reading.
Career – and interpretation for a 'Career 'reading.
Characteristics/Qualities – how a card may describe a person in a reading.
Timing – when something will occur.
Image Origins – explains the sources of the images, how they were adapted from PCS's original works. 
 
If you are a fan of Pamela Coleman Smith or the Rider Waite Smith deck then this Lenormand is a must have. It is a beautiful deck for both novice and adept alike… And would be especially helpful for a novice Lenormand user who has experience reading the RWS tarot. This is a fabulous homage to Pamela Coleman Smith and an absolutely delightful Lenormand deck.
— MedusaWink, Aeclectic Tarot
$18.95
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE WONDERLAND TAROT

The collaborative team of Christopher and Morgana Abbey beautifully adapted the style and flavor of Sir John Tenniel's illustrations of Lewis Carroll's work to fit the typical Rider-Waite-Smith (RWS) system. The Major and Minor Arcanas are fully illustrated, facilitating the work of a reader who is familiar with the RWS symbolism. Of course, the replacement of the suits occasionally gives the reader pause (The Swords, Staves, Cups, and Pentacles are now Flamingos, Peppermills, Hats, and Oysters, respectively), but once the reader accommodates to that alteration, this deck is found to be quite easy to work with. The color and style of these cards provide a somewhat Victorianesque feel that may be quite appealing to many readers. One of the considerable benefits of this deck, however, is that the cards themselves are the approximate size of a standard playing deck. Readers who permit the querant to shuffle the cards may appreciate this, as many non-readers (indeed, as well as some readers!) have a difficult time shuffling the slightly larger sized cards that are characteristic of most Tarot decks. Individuals with more mundane plans for this deck are additionally fortunate in that the playing-card equivalent of the Minor Arcana is notated in the borders of each of the appropriate cards (e.g., the “Five of Spades” is noted in the border of the Five of Flamingos). Although best suited for someone who already possesses a bit of Tarot acumen, the little white book (LWB) included with the deck should be particularly helpful to those not already acquainted with Alice and her adventures. Each card is well described in terms of its depiction of characters and suggested divinatory meanings. In sum, the Wonderland Tarot is a surprisingly pleasant deck that provides a whimsical atmosphere, familiar symbolism, and convenience in handling. This is a marvelous combination for any Tarot deck.
—Tom LeBlanc, Aeclectic Tarot


One of the most noticeable things about this deck is that the traditional suits have been changed: swords = flamingos; rods = peppermills; cups = hats; and pentacles = oysters. The suits are also marked with the corresponding symbols from ordinary playing decks: hearts, diamonds, spades, and clubs. The artwork is based on that in Lewis Carroll's Wonderland books. All of the characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass appear, including the Walrus and the Carpenter, the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, Bill the Lizard, the Mock Turtle, and the Cheshire Cat. Lewis Carroll appears as the Magician. Of course Alice appears repeatedly throughout the deck.



The illustrations are well done and capture the spirit of the books, with story elements well matched to cards' meanings. The deck feels good to hold, in part because they are close to the size of a standard playing deck. Also, the cards are of sturdy high quality, and have a strong, positive metaphysical feeling. 
This is a very unique and original deck. I would suggest it to anyone who collects tarot or is a Wonderland fan.
—Amazon customer

$18.95