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The Golden Dawn Tarot
The Golden Dawn Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE GOLDEN DAWN TAROT:

"The Golden Dawn Tarot" is an esoteric deck, based on the systems used by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Wang worked under the direction of Israel Regardie, with card interpretations based on those developed by S. L. MacGregor Mathers. In his foreword, Stuart Kaplan notes that the Golden Dawn Society included as its members some of the foremost occultists and writers of its time. As part of their sacred oath, they were sworn to secrecy. Based upon the esoteric notebooks of some of these members, under the guidance of Dr. Israel Regardie, Wang has faithfully produced, in authentic detail, each card in the Golden Dawn Tarot.

Kaplan sees the publication of this deck as an important "missing link" in the development of Tarot. His suggestion is to study this deck along with other decks that evolved from the work of Golden Dawn members, such as the "Rider-Waite Tarot" (by A. E. Waite and Pamela Coleman Smith), the "Builders of Adytum" (BOTA) deck issued under the guidance of Paul Foster Case, and the "Thoth Tarot", by Aleister Crowley and Lady Frieda Harris.

Wang, in his introductory notes, refers to the "Golden Dawn Tarot" as the only truly esoteric deck ever to be published. It is also the only deck to reach public view that was designed for the exclusive use of a powerful secret fraternity. Included in this deck is esoteric symbolism that has been kept shrouded in mystery as part of the Western Esoteric Tradition. As does Kaplan, Wang notes that this is the deck from which some of the greatest esoteric writers of our age developed their ideas about the Tarot.

Wang notes that the basic design of the cards comes from the work of S. L. MacGregor Mathers, following the framework of the Inner Tradition. Credit goes to Moira Mathers, S. L. MacGregor Mathers wife, for illustrating the original cards. Also noted is that after initiation into the grade of "Adeptus Minor", one of the tasks of the adept was to hand-paint a copy of the Tarot deck.

According to Wang, the purpose of the Tarot is to teach -- teach about the nature of the universe, and about man's relationship to the universe. Wang also sees the Tarot as illustrating the energies of the mystical system of Qabalah. The use of the Tarot for divination is seen as a means to provide an introduction to the visual patterns and subtle energies of the Tarot. In this respect, the true worth of the cards comes from repetitive usage, which helps to stimulate the unconscious and help develop psychic powers.

One spread is given in the LWB (Little White Book) for use by the reader, and it is simply termed the "Fifteen Card Method of Tarot Divination". The spread was specifically developed so that the meanings of the cards could be determined from their relationship to neighboring cards (Elemental Dignities), rather than using reversals. The spread is set out in groups of three, and is not difficult to lay down, or to interpret.

There are 84 cards that come with this deck: the traditional 78 cards of the Tarot, four blank white cards, a card illustrating the positions on the Tree of Life, and a card listing in text the "Key to the Tarot on the Tree of Life". The cards themselves are 3" by 5", of good quality, glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/2" white border, followed by a 1/2" green border, with symbols at the four corners, midway down each side, and in the middle of the bottom of the card. In the center we see a Cross, color coded by element, with a glyph of the Tree of Life in the middle. This graphic alone is well worth study for the symbolism that it contains.

There are some very interesting aspects to this deck, such as the appearance of luminescence around certain figures or objects (the upper body and head of the Fool; the entire body of the Magician, High Priestess; the head and scepter of the Empress, and the bird behind her; the head of the Emperor; the head and upper body of the Hierophant; the head and lamp of the Hermit; all of the Wheel of Fortune; the head of Justice; the head of the Hanged Man; all of Temperance; the Star; the three figures on the Moon; the male and female figures in Judgment; the four corner glyphs and the center figure in the World; the figures in the Court Cards).

For the most part, the symbols and figures used in this deck will be familiar to those readers using traditional decks. The Fool becomes a small child, plucking fruit from a tree; the High Priestess stands facing the reader, a cup held in front of her with both hands; the Chariot is shown as riding through the sky; the Hanged Man is suspended over water; there is a fire in the background of the Temperance card; yods appear in the sky, under the glyph of the moon, in the Moon card.

All of the suits show a stark white background, with a hand coming out of the clouds, holding the requisite number of suit symbols for each card. The Ace of Wands shows a tri-part wand, surrounded by Yods. Included in the suit of Cups is the use of flowers, as well as fish in the Two of Cups. The suit of Swords includes a red flower in some cards, with red Yods in other cards. The suit of Pentacles makes use of a "living branch" -- a branch that shows green leaves, as well as the suit symbol. For all of the suits, Kings are shown on horseback, Queens are shown seated on a throne, Princes are shown driving chariots, and Princesses are shown standing, appearing to be wearing some type of armor.

Each time I use this deck, I see more and more symbolism in it. It is easy to use, would fit well into readings, comparative readings, journaling, story, meditation, ritual, and ceremony. There is a companion book for this deck, written by Robert Wang ("An Introduction To the Golden Dawn Tarot") that is very helpful in working with this deck. For a student interested in studying the esoteric aspects of the Tarot, for someone looking for an alternative deck to offer their clients as a choice for doing a Tarot reading, or for a Tarot collector, this is a "must have" deck.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
The Herbal Tarot
The Herbal Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HERBAL TAROT:

The Herbal deck is beautifully illustrated. For example, the backs of the cards have a sea-green background with a rosemary border. As if marking elemental corners, there are four eight-petal flowers in blue, as well as two red ladybugs and two white flowers. The illustration of the cards themselves are done with the traditional meaning attributed, but also with the herb/plant/flower which attunes to the card. I find this to be even more helpful in understanding the meaning of particular cards. For example, the Tower is represented with garlic, Knight of Wands by aconite, Four of Swords by mullein, Ace of Wands by yarrow. Each of these adds an additional "feel" to the cards that I find are not present in traditional decks. I would recommend that anyone who is interested in both the Tarot and herbs to seek out this deck.

-- Maiden, on Aeclectic Tarot


I do a lot of readings for other people and Herbal Tarot remains one of my favorite decks. I long ago lost the little booklet that came with the deck, nor did I purchase a set with a detailed book. Instead I cross-reference this deck with my large herbal reference book. It has given me startling insights into the physical health of those I'm reading for. In addition, the magical and mythical backgrounds of the herbs add an extra dimension to the reading. I typically follow the same card interpretations that I would with any other deck and read intuitively, but I find that the herbs add so much. I feel I see the whole picture with this deck.

-- Nevada Sierra, on Amazon


What a lovely deck this is! Herbal Tarot makes you feel good to even use it. Based on the original Rider-Waite deck with an earthy twist! I recommend this deck to all nature & plant fanciers and especially herbal growers and lovers everywhere!

-- Violet Tea, on Amazon


This is a wonderful deck if you're new to tarot or are a person who gives "readings". The pictures of herbs are attractive and I have found that even those who are normally uncomfortable with using the Tarot can use this deck and for those getting a reading they are delightfully surprised at how "pretty" the deck is and may relax and enjoy the reading more. It boils down to this ... If you're a beginner the nice clear instructions and interpretations will appeal ... if you've been at this awhile then you know how to interpret on your own and can just enjoy the simple beauty of the pictures. Basic info on herbs and pictures of the herbs are included along with the interpretations. This is just an all around nice deck ... one that, although I have many others since I collect them, after many years I still continue to return to as my favorite. :-)

-- A.C., on Amazon


I learned from a friend with this deck and loved it. I thought the pictures were very clear & revealing. I liked how the herbal remedies overlapped & brought meaning with the readings. The descriptions seemed right on and very accurate. They definitely were very insightful. I'm addicted.

-- Heather, on Good Reads

$21.95
The Lover's Path Tarot
The Lover's Path Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT LOVER'S PATH TAROT

$21.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
The Winged Enchantment Oracle
The Winged Enchantment Oracle

What customers are saying about Winged Enchantment Oracle

Tarot superstar Lisa Hunt has joined forces with Lesley Morrison to merge the human spirit with nature’s winged spirits. Her 39 subtlety dynamic watercolors pay homage to the creatures sometimes referred to as the messengers of God.

Whether you use the cards for divination, meditation, or just enjoy the beauty of the paintings, these cards will prove uplifting and inspirational. The companion booklet by Lesley Morrison is beautifully written and explores the metaphor of bird as elevated human spirit poetically but with a clear eye. Each bird represented has it own haiku-like heralding statement (“You are presence. You are survival. You are bold ambition. You are Blue Jay.”)

From condor to hummingbird, the strength of each unique bird is highlighted in both word and paint. This deck will take you anywhere you are ready to go.

—Anna, TarotWise.com


Each card in this deck is associated with a particular bird so by choosing cards we can use the energy of that bird to help us resolve challenges or to get daily advice.  I love the idea of our ideas taking flight!  The author, Lesley Morrison links the bird image to ascension or otherworldly escapades, the fledgling to the master is a wonderful way to think of life.

There is something about birds that both fascinates and repels me at the same time.  This deck has been a wonderful experience for getting to know our bird friends and tapping into the wisdom they carry. Lisa Hunt’s artwork has made me see birds in a very different light-and I hope you will find this deck as interesting as I have.

I recommend the Winged Enchantment Oracle Deck to anyone who has an interest in Nature, Shape-Shifting, Birds, Lisa Hunt’s Art and to those who like to capture the magic of nature in a reading.  This deck allows your intuition and imagination to go wild with possibilities and that’s never a bad thing.  For me the descriptions on the cards read like an intention or prayer.  I like this idea! The Bird In Flight Spread looks really, really interesting and I can’t wait to try it out!

—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine


Birds and their magic are rooted in the collective unconscious, from pop culture’s Maleficent and the Mockingjay of The Hunger Games to the Pagan resurgence of the Morrigan. So it’s fitting that the language and wisdom of birds has been shaped into an oracle deck, with the teachings of each bird an opportunity for journeying, growth and ascension.

In Lesley Morrison’s introduction to the deck she describes the soul taking its first steps toward self knowledge as being like a baby bird: “awkward, stumbling, and rather more partial to the safety of the nest”, with the potentially arduous adventure of flight ahead – self development – often being described in myth as guided by a bird of some kind.

The 39 oracle cards feature eagles and starlings, condors and robins; there is a breadth of garden birds represented as well as birds of prey and ducks, geese, peacocks and parrots. Each bird is described in terms of its spiritual significance, with keywords at the bottom of the page, and the 48-page accompanying booklet features a few suggested spreads for the cards, albeit fairly generic apart from the Bird of Flight spread at the end which I thought was original and appropriate for the oracle as a whole.

Lisa Hunt’s Native American-inspired illustrations are utterly beautiful and have a depth of detail and a mastery of colour that makes these cards beautiful things in their own right, and I’m pleased that the cards themselves are large format enough to let the artwork shine. I was surprised how insightful the cards actually were, in use – coming to them cold and looking at the booklet I thought they might be insubstantial, but I found they supplemented tarot well and worked especially well for overall year readings, meditations or insight into deep motivations and approaches.

—Anna McKerrow, Pagan Dawn Magazine

$21.95
Ukiyoe Tarot
Ukiyoe Tarot

What customers are saying about Ukiyoe Tarot

Koji Furuta was hand-picked by tarot guru Stuart Kaplan to merge the world of Japanese Ukiyoe artwork with the traditional 78-card tarot deck. The resulting imagery captures the delicate, yet powerful, Ukiyoe style, while the end product is amazingly modern. Then again, that has always been the strength of Japanese art — spanning the ages.

Ukiyoe is a perfect medium to convey the ancient wisdom of the tarot. The Magician is poised like a samurai, ready to take action.The High Priestess peers out from behind her elaborate makeup and costuming to let querents know that her word is law. The Hierophant gazes sadly at his quizzical protegesJustice looks over her shoulder to make sure no one is being left behind. And a boddhisatva beckons from a heavenly lotus as the gravestones tumble in Judgement.

The more you know about the tarot, the more you will find in each illustration. If tarot is new to you, each card offers much to explore. This lively and intricate deck is a terrific oracle and, of course, it will prove valuable for meditation as well.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com

$21.95
Vampire Tarot Deck
Vampire Tarot Deck
What customers are saying about Vampire Tarot
 
I own this tarot deck and I fell in love with it. Each card has such character and is poignantly beautiful. I did a reading for a friend with it and she kept commenting on the eyes of the characters. You look at them and they seem to be looking at you. There is something deeply moving about the cards. I would look through them all over and over as each one is a work of art. My favorites were the Sun, the Hermit and the Fool. I adored this deck because it wasn’t all flowers and smiles. It was a bit gothic, striking and different. I wouldn't say it's dark and evil. It's just elaborate and gothic looking. People have long held a fascination with vampires because of their mystique and we all want to know what lurks in the shadows. In this deck, the vampires come out of the shadows. I would be picky with decks and never had much love for the traditional Rider-Waite as I found it "boring". Vampire Tarot is eccentric, alluring and different. I would really recommend it to anyone looking for an individualistic tarot deck. Let the eyes draw you in.
—Martha Clark, Amazon customer

I find this deck mesmerizing and accurate. The blood element may freak some people out, but it really isn't as macabre as it seems. The blood in this case is meant to represent life, so this deck really gets its message across in a different and powerful way.
 
I often take them out just to look at them. True the cards don't have a zillion things happening on them, but I find those kinds of decks taxing and needlessly complex. We aren't stupid, we don't need a thousand tiny details to understand what the cards are telling us. What I really appreciate about the Vampire Tarot is that, unlike so many other decks where the characters are distant and passive, in this deck the characters appear to acknowledge your presence and seem to be active participants in the reading. Another great thing about the Vampire Tarot is that the booklet provided with the cards explains the symbolism of the artwork of all 78 cards as well as their upright and reversed meanings. The cards are also very well glossed, and are a very good size to shuffle normally.
 
I highly recommend this deck to anyone ready to graduate from simply reading the cards to really understanding and working with the cards.
—“M from Manitoba”, Amazon customer

The pictures are beautiful, scary and completely hypnotic. Anyone who does tarot and does it consistently will agree that some decks have a bit of personality during some readings. This one packs a punch. Brutal honesty, meant to be that snarky advice that snaps you out of your "issues".
 
I'm aware that some tarot decks are just lovely pictures, but buy this deck in full confidence if you're looking for a deck that doesn't candy coat it's messages. Other decks are vague and fanciful...this one skips the sweets and right to business. Vampire Tarot is the best tarot deck I own.
“ShadowsCursed”, Amazon customer

II have never come upon such an intriguing and inspiring deck. It is my favorite, and I use it constantly. The Vampires have become my friends. I can consult them on anything from the wisdom of a financial venture to the well-being of my family. Of course they don’t always tell me what I want to hear, but they do always tell me what I need to know. For this, I love them.
I highly recommend this deck for those who are passionate about dark literary and fantasy figures such as vampires. Those who are intrigued by the unusual and the visually beautiful will also find this deck very appealing.
Cathi Bitzer, Aeclectic Tarot

I purchased this deck on a whim because the beautiful artwork was completely irresistible. Hertz's dark and brooding but beautiful characters HAD to come home with me, though I doubted I would ever use this deck in a reading. After examining it further, however, I am quite pleased with my spontaneous buy. It seems to be a rather accurate, if sometimes humorously gruesome deck.
Many of the cards in this deck draw on familiar images from standard decks such as the Rider-Waite, yet still hold their own in artistic expression. The High Priestess, for example, has on her familiar Hathor-like crown of glory, but it is formed from her hair, seeming to indicate this position is from her own achievement, not one bestowed upon her. The Strength card depicts a woman with her typical enormous feline companion, but it is the woman who is wild and needs taming. 
This deck is not only for the eyes, however. Since we all have dark sides, and skeletons in our closets, this may be the perfect deck to use when confronting difficult and dark issues. While the Justice card in most decks is righteous, honorable and regal, the Justice in this deck scares the bejeebers out of me! But perhaps that is the point. The whole theme of this deck is a look into the darker world, the world of Vampires. If I, or someone I loved, were threatened in any way, you'd bet I could become the Justice depicted here. She conveys a power and fierce strength that few people are willing to acknowledge they have. And though the pictures in this deck deal with the most base of human issues - survival - there is an honesty about Nathalie's creatures that many of us have lost. They are unashamedly themselves, with no apologies offered. Taking a step into the world of Natalie Hertz's vampires could oddly enough reveal a more human you. 

Napaea, Aeclectic Tarot
$21.95
Whimsical Tarot Deck
Whimsical Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Whimsical Tarot

The Whimsical Tarot is a lot of fun -- although I originally bought it for my children to use, I found myself drawn to some of the really clever imagery. Hanson-Roberts uses traditional fairy tale characters to portray the divinatory meanings of each card. The Major Arcana, in particular, are well chosen, as are the court cards. This is a great deck to use if you're teaching kids the Tarot, or if you just want to expand your own horizons a bit. The artwork is lovely, and the card associations are clearly thought out. Definitely worth buying, if you enjoy Tarot and classic children's stories!

—Patti Wigington, About.com


Drawn by Mary-Hanson Roberts, who also created the art for the Hanson-Roberts Tarot and the Universal Waite Tarot, the Whimsical Tarot is based on fairy tales and nursery rhymes and intended for children and the 'young at heart'.

But it is by no means limited to children. The fairytales are familiar to almost everyone, the simplicity and already associated meaning with the cards helping to make tarot more accessible to a beginner.

Some of the cards make me chuckle, others I find impressive because of the approachable rendering of normally disliked cards. The Devil card, for example, shows a pair of hands controlling a marionette, a puppet on strings. The Death card is Sleeping Beauty.

I adore the backs of the cards. A lilac flower is in a rectangular focus in the center of the card. Surrounded by a mauve border, then a thicker border of yellow Celtic knot work on a turquoise background, it is restful, appropriate for upright or reversed readings, and very pretty.

I highly recommend the Whimsical Tarot as a child's tarot deck; for people who read for children; or for sensitive souls who aren't keen on confronting images on their tarot cards. The Whimsical Tarot gets the message across without being dark, negative or scary.

I also think it is a good beginners deck, as the fairytales used on each card allow the tarot novice to hang the tarot concepts on a framework they are familiar with. Learning seventy-eight different tarot meanings and how to interpret the tarot symbols can very seem daunting, but the Whimsical Tarot's cards are cute and the scenes already familiar. Hanson-Roberts combined traditional fairytales and tarot make a beautifully presented, sweet, and thoroughly whimsical tarot deck.

—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


She sat down and flipped through the deck, her eyes lighting up as the realized that she recognized all the fairytales and stories within each card. She squealed with excitement when the 4 of Swords reminded her of the Princess and the Pea, and she jumped up and down in her seat happily as the Magician bought back the story of Puss in Boots. When she had finished looking through the deck, she handed it back to me, with a grin from ear to ear adorning her face: My Mother appeared to like the deck.

As can be seen from my Mother's reaction, the Whimsical Tarot is aimed at children and the young at heart. The cards are adorned with fairytales, nursery rhymes, and stories that we were told as children, and as such, there are many adults who can use this deck very effectively. The benefits of using fairytales and such to illustrate the meanings of the cards is that nearly everybody is familiar with most of them, and thus can understand the meaning in the card without having to look in any book. Fairytales bring back fond memories of childhood, and those nights on the sofa with your Granny, when she would make you hot chocolate and then read Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm to you until you were too sleepy to stay awake any longer. The attraction of a deck surrounded by, and based upon, these stories is understandable.

This deck is largely traditional: the names of the cards, the suits of the Minors, the ordering of the Majors, and the meanings of the cards are all Rider-Waite traditional. The only thing that differs is the pictures used to illustrate the cards, as these are taken directly from the fairy stories applied to each card. All of the cards are fully illustrated with the gorgeous artwork of Mary Hanson-Roberts. The Court Cards are particularly appealing, all being characters from stories, with the Queen and King usually being from the same story, eg- King and Queen of Pentacles being Maid Marion and Robin Hood. The Pages in this deck are the most interesting I have come across, and certainly the easiest to understand! Instead of showing people, they show objects, which convey the meaning of the card. For instance, the Page of Swords shows a telescope, and the Page of Pentacles shows gold coins, scales, and a tally-chart. This is a great help, especially for young children and beginners, as it is often the Court Cards that are the most difficult to read.

All the fairytales are well chosen and very evocative. Every other deck I have seen which uses fairytales as its theme has failed in that sometimes the chosen fairytales are chosen superficially, for instance, in one deck I found that the Emperor card was represent by the Emperor's New Clothes, which really didn't have anything to do with the meaning at all. With this deck, that's not the case: Every single card's fairytale is chosen for its meaning and significance. That is an achievement within itself I think, and something that this deck deserves praise for.

I love this deck. It is the best one I have seen which is aimed at children, but which also proves to be an excellent deck for adults! Children, beginners, adults who enjoy fairy stories, collectors, and those who like Mary Hanson-Roberts' artwork would all enjoy this deck immensely and learn alot from it. For myself, after using this deck, I found that I could read better in general: the meanings of the cards took on a more imaginative form, and I could apply meanings from the cards to the querent's life very easily. As an introduction to the Tarot, or as a deck for the more advanced reader, this is an absolute treasure.

—Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot has a great richness to it because it is drawing on our knowledge of fairy tales as well as our knowledge of the Tarot. It works well for intuitive readings based on the images which can speak directly to us at a deep level. Although it may look like a children's deck it is suitable for anyone who is happy with an attractive, amusing deck which has more depth to it than appears at first glance. 


—Fairyhedgehog, Aeclectic Tarot


I have recommended this deck to everyone I know interested in Tarot and while at first they read reviews and see the deck and question me, once they USE the deck for the first time, they are hooked! As the author states in her introduction, the images are intended to appeal to our inner child, our earliest memories and our connections to fairy tales and their distinct sense of right and wrong, good and evil. These descriptions, again, seem simplistic and very black and white, and life deals us, like the Tarot, a mixed bag with gray areas, this deck comes through with clear messages and direction. Like our proverbial Knight in Shining Armor, the message in a spread heralds in with ease and in a manner that allow for deeper reflection as you view the images on the cards.

The artwork in this deck cannot be complimented enough. The images perfectly match the descriptions. Ms. Morrison, in her introduction, compliments Ms. Hanson-Roberts with seeing within her own mind and having an innate understanding of her ideas. This is true for this deck like no other I have encountered. There is a perfect congruity between image and word.

—Kate Robinson, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot approaches the reading of cards from a completely different aspect -- by associating with childhood images and fairy tales. This deck allows us to connect with our "inner child". Although the name may suggest this is a less than serious deck, this deck is a very valuable tool in discovering our inner selves and helping us reconnect with those simple things that give us joy.

The images on the cards do not obviously correspond with the imagery from our experiences with the Rider-Waite style of decks. Gone are the confusing "Quabalah mystery" symbolism that we pondered and studied in order to interpret the meanings of those older decks. This is the use of simple and obvious imagery that gives us instant insight into the meaning of the cards.

The images are drawn from well-known fairy tales and are familiar to just about anyone. The artwork of Mary Hanson-Robert is clean. She gives us very colorful images that attract attention but are not obtrusive. The artwork is not distracting, but is lovely to sit and reflect upon.

As we explore the deck, we find some familiar tarot references. We do have a Major Arcana comprised of 22 cards, all clearly marked with the number of the card in its order, and the name of the card. There is no mistaking the card's association. The Fool - 0 - is the scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz. If you look at the tarot as a personal journey of the one who begins as a fool, this association is very obvious. We have the symbolism of the yellow brick road, we have Toto and so much more. The Magician is Puss in Boots, the High Priestess is the Fairy Godmother. There are some very interesting associations, as with The Emperor being Father Christmas, the Old Woman in the Shoe for the Empress, Judgment using The Cricket from Pinnochio, Glinda for The World, "Goldilocks being discovered" as Justice. The images are so obvious in some instances, yet they challenge you to use your own judgment and personal insights.

I also find myself drawing on my own knowledge of the tarot and associations when I am using this deck. While someone who is not familiar with the traditional meanings of the tarot will find this a very easy and fun deck to use, those of us who are trained in the traditional meanings will not find this "foreign" as there are familiar associations here. When we look at the "Two of Cups", the traditional meaning being a lesser "Lovers" card, it's association is still retained with the story of the "Owl and the Kitty Cat", so we are not totally out of familiar grounds. Pentacles still retains its meaning of material matters while cups still reflects inner emotions. The "Ten of Swords", a card of chaos and mistakes, shows the story of Humpty Dumpty falling off the wall. The traditional meanings are not told in the mysterious symbolism but in very obvious and well thought through imagery.

The small details on the cards not only attract attention but allow special reflection and a good look at one's inner self. And these special touches make this a remarkable deck. I love this deck for personal contemplation. I have also used this deck for clients who wanted to examine their own personal feelings and issues and it has provided much insight. It works as well with clients as it does with personal readings.

I would also like to suggest that if you have a youngster who is interested in tarot cards and readings, that this would make a perfect first deck. As our children watch us using the cards, they will also want to explore the path with you, as all children look to their parents for guidance. This deck is so perfect for the younger apprentice that I couldn't think of any deck more perfect for the "almost teenager" or the "First Deck" gifting. If you are looking for something that is perfect for a holiday gift, or someone just starting, or the "first deck" give this deck a viewing and see if you don't agree this could be the deck for you.

—Margaret Foster, Amazon customer

$21.95
I Cani Originali (Dogs) Tarot Deck
I Cani Originali (Dogs) Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT I CANI ORIGINALI (DOGS) TAROT DECK:

The card featured on the cover of this delightful Majors-only set is number 19, "Il Sole," portraying a bright, sunny dog that reminds me of my Sheltie, Suki, who just recently passed away. If I had to choose a card to represent her, it would indeed be The Sun, as she was always smiling, enjoying life with boundless energy.

All of the images on these cards are straightforward in meaning. A puppy in a jester's cap looks excitedly at a blanket decorated with cats in "Il Matto," or The Fool. He is poised in playful readiness, for whatever adventure or encounter might await. "Il Bagatto," The Magician, performs a trick, demonstrating an uncommon mastery of skills. The Empress and Emperor are crowned, regal dogs, The Lovers a close, furry couple sitting upon a be-hearted floor. Long fur shades the eyes of "L'Eremita," The Hermit, giving him a solitary, withdrawn look, and in "La Forza," or Strength, our pooch proves his strength with one paw placed powerfully on a big bone.

I love all of the cards in this limited edition, collector's deck, but of course, I love dogs! One would find readings with this set a little strained, not necessarily by expecting more meaning from the images, but simply because the images are all so sweet! Even 13, "La Morte" - Death, brings a smile with its Doberman wearing a spiked collar. He stands in an intimidating manner and though he doesn't hold a scythe, one does appear against the clouds behind him. Still, although the meaning is rather clear (and ominous), the card portrays a lovely dog, more than anything else.

The cards are of heavy ivory paper, very artfully produced, and packaged in a hardcover case that ties with a ribbon. As a collector's set for lovers of tarot and of dogs, I Cani is wonderful, and would make a terrific little gift. I keep mine on a shelf above my dresser, where Il Sole can remind me of Suki, and the spirit of dogs. Note: the ribbon on my deck is pale pink. The cards are small in size, at 2" x 2 15/16".

– Osvaldo Menegazzi

$22.00
Ancient Animal Wisdom
Ancient Animal Wisdom

What customers are saying about Ancient Animal Wisdom oracle

These cards are alive with color, creating a “mood” that flows into and around the person viewing and using them. Artistic interpretations of the animals (and trees) are at various times whimsical (Baboon, Frog), realistic (Mountain Zebra, Wildebeest), and what I would call “psychedelic” (Black Mamba Snake, Flamingo). Then there’s the Honey Badger, assigned the perfect keyword: Fierce. The style is, in one sense, primitive, but also quite complex.

As the owner of many animal-themed oracle and tarot decks, I am always on the lookout for something different in that realm. Ancient Animal Wisdom focuses on African animals, portraying them with vivid color and a somewhat abstract style – but never so abstract that you can’t tell what animal (or tree) is being shown. I love that the images on these cards evoke a response, a feeling, a reaction. My gaze dwells on the images, enjoying the free flowing colors and clever details. I am looking forward to reading with this deck!

Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes blog


The energy and esoteric wisdom of 38 animal spirit guides from Africa are captured in this exotic deck. The symbolism is also aligned with traditional numerology, increasing the power of each card for use in both meditation and divination.

The illustrations hint at the powerful primitive art of Africa, but are infused with an astral realm imaginative stream, which transports them out the physical realm and into the world of spirit. Each image speaks from the card, challenging the observer to delve into its insightful world and look for the secrets that are hidden from the self-aware consciousness.

It's an exciting new deck for novices and seasoned oracle readers alike.

—Anna, Tarotwise.com

$22.95
Botanical Inspirations Deck & Book Set
Botanical Inspirations Deck & Book Set

What customers are saying about Botanical Inspirations

So many things to love about this deck and book set, it’s hard to know where to start – but I’m going to start with the packaging, which is superb. The top of the sturdy flip-top cardboard box features a lush collage of Pierre-Joseph Redouté’s Victorian flower art, including the dahlia, coreopsis, asters, forget-me-nots, and amaryllis, among others. This box is roomy enough for a perfect-bound guidebook with the same illustration on its cover, the deck of 44 cards, a trifold pamphlet listing keywords for all of the flowers shown on the cards, and an organza pouch the same shade of mint green as the box, booklet, pamphlet, and card backs. Also included is a card providing detailed information about Redouté, who was born in 1759 to a Flemish family of decorative painters.

By the late 1790s, Redouté was the most famous and sought after flower painter in Europe. Card faces are a tan parchment color, an attractive background for the artwork. The cards do a beautiful job of combining science and sentiment. At the top, centered, is the common name of the flower, with the Latin name or alternative name centered immediately under that in flowery script. Next comes the Redouté’s illustration of the flower. The style is realistic, and it is easy to see how the artist was influenced by the botanist Charles Louis L'Héritier, who offered Redouté free access to his botanical library and plant collection. Centered below the artwork is the meaning attributed to that flower. Finally, also centered, we have a quotation that reflects that symbolism.

For each flower, the guidebook provides a black-and-white version of the Redouté illustration, the common name and Latin name for the flower, symbolism, quotation, a long paragraph discussing the flower and its meaning, and an Inspirational Message. The eloquent writing in the guidebook is a pleasure to read, offering tidbits of the fascinating history and cultural interpretations associated with each flower. The Botanical Inspirations cards are perfect for drawing a daily Affirmation, and the guidebook can be used as a resource when researching the various flowers and their meanings.

—Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


The Botanical Inspirations Deck, by Lynn Araujo, comes beautifully packaged in a sturdy floral box with a lovely spring green deck bag. The deck and box set includes a Secret Language of Flowers fold-out reference guide that is a shortcut to understanding the secret meaning of the flowers. If you are an herbalist and gardener like myself, you will appreciate the simple beauty and vintage look and feel of this deck. The cardstock is substantial, but shuffles well and the cards have wonderfully rounded corners, which add to the luxury feel of this wonderful deck. The illustrator is Pierre-Joseph Redoute (1759-1840), and the pictures are classic illustrations that everyone can relate to in a reading. Who can resist the "Red Rose" which Lynn calls her card of Hidden Secrets. Red Roses have been given as a sign of romantic love as far back as antiquity. On the card, Ms. Araujo quotes Buddha with the phrase "Three things cannot be hidden, the sun, the moon, and the truth." No truer words have been spoken. It is said that romantic love is the elixir of the Gods and the card of the Red Rose when pulled speaks to our inner-longing to love and be loved without condition. If you are looking for a beautiful and inspirational deck to begin your day with by pulling one flower out of the deck to meditate on then look no further than the Botanical Inspirations Deck, by Lynn Araujo, beautifully published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
You won't be disappointed!

—Karen Hollis, Readings by Karen


Wow! It is beautiful with fantastic cardstock I love the box, booklet, pamphlet and bag that comes with it. It full of amazing flowers and quotes. I think all decks (Oracle, Tarot and Lenormand) should be made at this level of quality!

—“Lost Lovely Lady”


I'm a professional Tarot consultant. My first word when I got this deck was, "WOW." The design is the very first thing that caught my eye. The artwork of Pierre-Joseph Redouté has had a long life due to the nature of his talent. He saw things and brought out details in flowers that no one else did. The box that comes with this deck puts me in mind of a miniature writing box from the Victorian era. It is a solidly constructed box too. There's even a small bag for the cards inside the box. The ribbon on the lid along with the lift-out ribbon makes the box a real stand-out.

The cards themselves are quality. They have the images of the flowers against a cream background which enhances the antique effect. You get the name of the flower at the top with the Latin name beneath. At the bottom of the card, you are given a combination keyword + key phrase. Then the card is completed by a quote.

Author Lynn Araujo knows her flowers too. It is obvious that she is fluent in the language of flowers. I particularly liked that she didn't just stick to one cultural reference. Her knowledge has depth to it that sings through her writing.


—Tarot by Arwen

$22.95
Celtic Lenormand
Celtic Lenormand

What customers are saying about Celtic Lenormand

The Celtic Lenormand is an interesting take on Lenormand created by Chloë McCracken and Will Worthington.  It expands, stretches and allows for a customized reading with the extra cards that have been added.

In your kit you will get 45 cards and a guidebook in a sturdy box.  The card size is perfect for Lenormand style decks and the finish on the cards allows for smooth shuffling.  The guidebook explains what makes this is a pagan-themed deck.

The guidebook for The Celtic Lenormand far exceeds the “little white book” that we usually find with decks.  For example each card-even the extra cards have extensive keywords, timing, person, playing card association, description, meanings, spiritual readings, dark and light, spell use, affirmation and deity.

There are 13 illustrated layouts in the guidebook and a small section on combining cards.

I recommend this deck to anyone who has an interest in Lenormand decks and especially to those who walk the pagan path.  With the added cards you can customize your readings to fit almost any relationship dynamic. If you want a more traditional reading you can remove the extra cards.  I am impressed with this deck, the guidebook and the extensive information provided.

—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine


As a follower of Chloë McCracken’s blog Inner Whispers, a fan of Will Worthington’s art, and a lover of all things Celtic, I was pretty sure I was going to like the Celtic Lenormand. As it turns out, I don’t just like it, I love it. The art is exquisite, as expected, and Chloë delivers much more in the accompanying book than I could have imagined. I am looking forward to trying some of the spreads provided in the book and sharing them on my blog,Tarot Notes.

The images are Celtic versions of the traditional Lenormand deck images. In addition, symbolism shown in the images is designed to represent important aspects of the pagan path and perception of the world. The eight sabbats are represented, as are the phases of the moon. Specific cards are included for the god and goddess, as well as suggestions for deities appropriate to the other cards. The deck contains two tree cards for the God (the Oak and the Holly), three different Birds cards that reflect the three aspects of the Goddess (Maiden/Mother/Crone), an additional snake card that reflects the more positive aspects of the snake; a cat card (cats are traditional familiars); and four additional “people” cards.

The backdrop for the cards in the Celtic Lenormand is the landscape of Brittany, in the north of France. The colors are intense, expressing a variety of tones or moods. The images are sharp, clear, and realistic.

Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


This creative and beautifully illustrated deck of 45 cards parlays the popular Lenormand deck into a new and unique divinatory tool. Nine cards have been added to the standard Lenormand lineup and the images have all been related to Celtic tradition. The deck reflects the pantheon of pagan gods and goddesses, the phases of the moon, the Wheel of the Year, and the natural elements.

Those who are seasoned Lenormand readers can use the standard 36 cards but find them enhanced by Worthington’s spectacular renderings. More free-spirited readers can add the additional cards when they do a reading, or leave them out as they choose.

In addition to the usual keywords and divinatory meanings, the 188-page guidebook contains associations for traditional playing cards and Celtic deities, affirmations, and special spiritual interpretations. If you love oracle decks, don’t miss this one!

—Anna,Tarotwise.com


Really a great deck. I love the artwork that was used to create this deck. Very lovely art with an Old World feel to the deck. It comes in a very sturdy box and easy to open. The booklet that comes with has a lot of information. This deck was very well thought out by its creators. I am very happy to have this deck.

“Feline Lover”, Amazon customer

$22.95