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The Crowley Tarot: The Handbook to the Cards
The Crowley Tarot: The Handbook to the Cards

What customers are saying about The Crowley Tarot Handbook

When starting out with a Crowley Thoth deck, this book is an excellent and comprehensive guide for understanding the extensive symbolism of this deck. Every card is fully described and the fluid, energetic art of Lady Frieda Harris is explained very well. Some beginning and intermediate Tarotists also find value in this book, even if they are not working with the Crowley deck, because of its guide to mythical, mystical, and historical symbolism found in many tarot decks.

—Margaret Ruth, author of Superconscious Relationships


Akron and Banzhaf's text is insightful and oracular, giving diviners plenty of poetic and mythic depth to work with as they discern the meanings of the cards and their spreads. If you're prepared to do the work, this text will at least grant you entry into Crowley's symbolic universe.

—Peter Fyfe, Amazon customer

$17.95
Medieval Cat Tarot
Medieval Cat Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MEDIEVAL CAT TAROT:

When I heard of the Medieval Cat Tarot I was a little skeptical. I would have thought the market for cat decks was becoming rather crowded and that it would be hard to make an impression, but the Medieval Cat Tarot manages to stand out with its novel blending of traditional and modern imagery and style.

I was pleasantly surprised when I opened the box and began to examine the cards. They are glossy, smooth and very polished in appearance; a little longer and thinner than usual cards but very easy to handle and with a nice feel. The cards were inspired by fifteenth century art, and have the look of the historical Visconti-Sforza. The very consistent artistic style was created by Lawrence Teng, who also worked together with Gina M. Pace (Wicce) to complete the companion text.

The Major Arcana cards feature stately cats with bodies in human poses, their head and feet cat-like in shape but palely human in colouring. The symbology has a traditional foundation, but has been stripped down and reduced of clutter. The Minor Arcana take a new direction and combine modern and standard styles. They appear to be traditional looking pip cards in the background, but in the centre have a kind of porthole. Here, a RWS-style scene has been condensed down its essentials and shows a medieval cat participating in the activity or feeling of the card. Some scenes have been altered to be more immediately clear and aren't a complete RWS clone, but they somehow seem truer to the meaning. The best card of these cards in my opinion is the Seven of Swords -- a blue-dressed cat stands next to an empty and rocking birdcage, empty of its canary but drifting feathers. Others worth mentioning are the Four of Pentacles, a portly cat holding a ring of keys in front of a heavily padlocked door; the Eight of Wands, where a cat stands poised with a note on the end of an arrow, poised to fly, to name but two.

The major cards have standard Rider-Waite style titles, but are without numbering to avoid the Strength/Justice conundrum. Of note is the Empress, who has the significant addition of children, and she stands in a very Hierophant-like pose with her hands on their hands (though it appears somewhat more caring). The Devil is a fox-like creature, expensively dressed and hiding behind a cat-shaped mask. I particularly like Death, showing as it does a robed Death figure who has a feline skull and jaw. All of the feline figures are elegant and well dressed, and no strong emotion passes their face. They are rarely kitschy and never cute -- above all they are dignified, as a cat should be.

The court cards are titled traditionally, but in imagery are a departure from the traditional. They have been changed to more clearly differentiate between each other, with the element develops from the Pages through to the Kings. Each court figure is dressed in a different period costume, and interacts with their element in a different way.

The booklet is small and staple bound, but includes a satisfying amount of information and meaning for each card in English. The card backs have an almost reversible (they are reversible at a distance) design, though they are intended to be read upright. The Medieval Cat Tarot is simple and clear enough to be an easily readable for the beginner and intermediate reader, while at the same time it is an original and polished deck with links to Tarot's history and European tradition. A deck for the cat lover, the lover of the Renaissance era, and most especially for the Tarot reader.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I thought this would be a light-hearted deck mostly for show. I was wrong. The symbolism is remarkably clear and the cat faces don't in any way detract from the ability to take this deck seriously. The images are charming in style, faintly folkart-ish, and it's a very easy deck to read. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants an accessible deck, including those new to tarot.

-- GriffonSong, Amazon customer


I wasn't sure what to expect of this deck, but what I honestly didn't expect was to be as wholly impressed as I am. The cats have not simply been dressed in Renaissance garb or put in tarot poses. They have been depicted to demonstrate precise meanings for the cards, with depth and accuracy. They are not overly cute; rather, they gaze out from the cards with often serious looks of contemplation, and expressiveness that is shown mostly in their eyes. Also, they are not all cat but somewhat human, with human shapes, and hands. One does not have to be a big cat lover to enjoy the deck -- the cats as tarot figures are entirely convincing.

Though the illustrations are based largely on the Rider-Waite, the cards depend on their own imagery. And this they do very well. For example, in the Eight of Swords, a cat stares wide-eyed out from behind bars, which are further blocked by a chain and lock. A key dangles near the cat, though he doesn't notice it. A cat sits with arms crossed in front of his chest in the Four of Cups, three ignored cups before him, and a fourth cup being offered to him on a tray. His gaze is cast to the side. The miserliness of the Four of Coins is indicated in many locks on a cat's door. He holds a ring of keys, but the task of opening the door looks tedious. The sense of being overly cautious, protecting or guarding what one has, is obvious. The little booklet explains the card with good balance: "The Four of Coins shows where we feel threatened by what we have experienced in the past; our security is exercised in overkill because our perception of danger or struggle is much more than the reality. We may actually be safe, but we still feel intimidated. We must realize that our foundation has been laid securely and we may now build upon it." Another good example of this effective use of simple imagery is the Three of Wands, in which our cat holds a small ship in one hand, a telescope in the other. The text that interprets this card for us says, "The Three of Wands symbolizes the ability to see what it is that we are launching and to put it into motion. We carry with us the small tokens that remind us that we are responsible for putting our own ships out to sea if we wish to see our ships return overflowing with prosperity and abundance." The pictures are incredibly clear in meaning, but the artwork is purposeful, rich, and ornate. Interpretation and understanding are accessible, while the aesthetic experience is fully rewarding.

The Majors are not numbered. The artist states simply, "Some of the first tarot decks did not include numerology symbols or a numbering system in the Major Arcana. I have chosen that same omission for Medieval Cat Tarot. As there is some interchangeability with a few of the Majors (most often Strength and Justice), this allows the reader to use the cards at his or her discretion." I will just note -- for those who might be starting out -- that this does not make using the cards any more difficult. A traditional ordering of the cards is presented in the booklet. Most of the Majors stick to expected imagery, though often with a whimsical or lighthearted air -- The Hanged Man reminds me that cats always land upright from a fall, because the featured cat here does not exactly hang upside down as is standard -- he looks ready to land safely if he falls. This seems to intend a hopeful aspect of a card that is sometimes misunderstood as frightening or ominous. The grim reaper in Death is surrounded by butterflies, which indicate personal metamorphosis. It is a purely positive element in what some believe is a difficult card. And the Devil is a fox hiding behind a cat's mask, and makes clear the meaning expressed in the booklet: "It is the Devil inside each of us that this card addresses. We are our own worst enemy -- we bedevil ourselves at the times when we undermine our own best efforts to get clear of the repeating patterns of behavior and abuse in our lives. This Devil, for example, hides behind a mask, much as we hide behind our own denial when we fight ourselves on many levels."

Also notable in Medieval Cat Tarot, is the emphasis on the court cards to provide insight into the self, rather than to merely serve as representations of others. These are presented largely as a progression of the self, which stage one might be in, etc. The court cards can still represent another, but they are clearly described as phases in development, and in this way are quite helpful. An included spread, "The Court Cards Curve," is an aid in learning to see the court cards in this way.

Because of the simplicity in symbolism, the deck would be a super choice for someone just starting out. The accompanying booklet offers more than enough instruction on the meanings of each card, along with added insight and clear ideas for interpretation. It is a highly readable, very strong, and well-rounded deck, in image and word. My own readings with it have been highly useful and insightful. I recommend it for everyone -- except perhaps, those who really don't like cats!

-- Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot

$21.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Oracle of the Dragonfae
Oracle of the Dragonfae

What customers are saying about Oracle of the Dragonfae

When you open the box of this deck and book set, you will find yourself instantly being greeted by a deck of forty-three incredibly magical beings. You can almost feel the elemental strength and protection surround you as you flip through the cards. You will find the beauty of the Faerie Realm combined with the strength of the Dragon. The artwork for The Oracle of the Dragonfae deck is that of seven different artists. There is a small bio about each one of the artists in the back of the Guidebook. The artists’ use of color in the artwork is brilliant, bold, and well thought out, creating very powerful imagery. Upon further exploration you will find that these elementals are much more than they appear. They have been designed to help us heal ourselves, others and save our planet. They encourage you to see the magic in the world around you, every day! Even though this deck is very beautiful, this is not a fluffy faerie deck. Be prepared to do some soul searching when using this oracle.

—Terri Clement, American Tarot Association

This is an absolutely gorgeous set of oracle cards visually. As with all Blue Angel Gallery products, I adore their bigger included book size, and the quality of their cards. Each of the artists used in this tarot deck are so gifted - I loved loved LOVED each of their representations, and the different energies it brings to this deck.

Aside from the beautiful visual aspects though, I need to say that this is one of the most powerful, accurate oracle cards I've been blessed to experience. Every reading I have done with it has been amazingly accurate, and the wisdom in these cards is powerful and deep.

I also need to say that from the covering box, I at first didn't pick up these cards because it has such a dark cover. (Editor’s note: The box image has been changed.) I'm so glad I did though - inside it is shining with light, and the friendship of the Dragonfaes. My highest ho! to Lucy for creating these oracle deck of miracles... you are such a blessing!

—Goddess of Leonie, Amazon customer

This is a magical deck, inspirational, and highly recommended for all who dare to enter its realm. The Dragonfae are powerful beings, if you were guided to get them, do so you will not be disappointed, the magic is immense within this deck, A++++

—Archangels, Amazon customer

This is what you will get with this oracle. The beautiful creatures plus ease of reading add up to a highly respectable oracle deck. The creatures in this deck intrigued me and kept me so. The look and feel of the cards are nothing less than supreme. They are a tad larger than norm, but I tend to like larger cards - especially as I get older.

The book is easy to read and provides a step-by-step approach for the less experienced reader and many "tips" for the master reader. This oracle works well for anyone who wants to let these magical creatures lead the way in the present, into the future or advise how to learn/cherish the past. If you like fantasy art, you will not regret giving these cards an opportunity to speak to you.

—S. Ruff Blueslover13, Amazon customer

These cards are truly unique compared to some of the other oracle sets I've collected. It's not the usual rehashed mythology, but a new and refreshing take on both dragons and faeries. The colors are bright, with large, easy to read captions. Artwork is mystical and beautifully drawn.

—J. Byrdd, Amazon customer

$23.95
Sun and Moon Tarot
Sun and Moon Tarot

What customers are saying about Sun and Moon Tarot

Illustrator Vanessa Decort has created a stunning yet simple deck with her Sun And Moon Tarot. On close inspection, there is a richness and complexity that draws you in and lends new, subtle nuances to your tarot readings. Decort describes the deck this way: "The Sun And Moon Tarot considers universal archetypes and cultural symbols, and also incorporates the artist's own personal symbols."

Based on the Thoth deck, it stays true to the titles that Aleister Crowley used (ex: 7 of Pentacles - Failure; Art - Temperance; Princes and Princes rather than Knights and Pages). I've always been somewhat intimidated by the Thoth deck but Decort has taken that influence and infused it with an almost playful, childlike essence. This could be because she has a background as an illustrator for children's books or perhaps she simply wanted to deliver the wisdom of the Thoth deck in a more whimsical and accessible manner. The result is an inviting, fun deck that never loses its Thoth roots.

This is a well-made deck on sturdy card stock with a somewhat matte finish. It felt great in my hands, shuffled well and seemed built to last. This is very important to me as I tend to be hard on my decks through constant use. The back of the deck is a gorgeous black and white mandala - and it's reversible, another small detail that I like.

Each image is framed by white borders with titles (in English) and numbers clearly printed. Colors are bold yet muted. I especially liked the choices for the Minors suits - neutral, earthy tones for Earth; dark grey, burnt sienna and orange flames for Fire; rich midnight blue for Water; and light sky blue for Air. These color schemes make sense and allow the reader to instantly know which suit they are working with before they even glance at the title.

There are strong Kabbalah and alchemy influences throughout the deck - each Major has a Hebrew letter and the elemental symbols appear on every minor. Yogic images are scattered about - fro the OM symbol in the Hermit to the dancing Shiva as the Universe (World)!

The Major Arcana is especially rich with symbols - the yin and yang in the Temperance and the Phoenix in the Death card convey the meanings clearly. Astrological symbols are featured throughout the Majors - for example, the Cancer symbol on the chest of the driver in The Chariot or the ram's heads and lamb (Aries) in the Emperor.

One of the things I liked the best about this deck was the multicultural imagery. Rather than "standard" RWS people, there are all races represented here - black, white, dark haired, redheads and more. This gives the deck a "modern" appeal and I happen to like that as my own personal life is diverse - so seeing this detail made me feel more connected to the deck.

I'm giving this deck two Swords up. It is a unique and interesting deck for any tarot lover's collection.

—Theresa Reed, “The Tarot Lady”

 

 

$21.95
Tea Leaf Fortune Cards
Tea Leaf Fortune Cards

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TEA LEAF FORTUNE CARDS:

Reading tea leaves – how much more esoteric can one get! One might expect to find this in a quaint little tearoom, or perhaps in a Harry Potter movie, but as an everyday part of life … something that we can all do? Not without years of training, and a very will developed intuition and imagination. In reality, Rae Hepburn did have years of training … from her father, who studied Oriental and Indian metaphysical philosophies. Her father invented games for her when she was a child, games that were based on intuition. One of their favorite games was absorbing energy from another person's aura and interpreting it. Hepburn learned to go with her gut feeling, bypassing the logical processes of the brain.

Hepburn learned tea leaf reading from an Aunt. Hepburn's friends were eager to learn tea leaf reading, and asked her to compile a list of images and their meanings. The list that she compiled was daunting – 500 images, and their associated meanings. Seeing that memorizing this list could be rather over-whelming, Hepburn decided to develop a set of cards that would serve the same purpose as the images in the tea leaves. To make the list more manageable, Hepburn concentrated on the images that appeared most frequently, eliminating the ones that rarely appeared. She also eliminated symbols that duplicated the meaning of another symbol. The cards are round, so that they resemble a teacup. A personal thought here is that round cards can also convey degrees of meaning (as part of a circle of 360 degrees).

The deck and companion book come is s sturdy cardboard box, with a cover that lifts up, but not completely off. There are two sections for the cards, along with a gold bag to place them in so that they can be mixed and drawn for readings.

The 98-page companion book begins with a history of tea and tea leaf reading, then moves into the actual manner in which tea leaves are read from actual tea. I found this to be both complex and fascinating. I also found myself thanking my lucky stars that I was going to be reading from a deck of cards! This section also gives an example of one type of Tea Leaf reading - Reading For The Coming Year.

Three methods are presented for using the Tea Leaf Fortune Cards – (1) The Coming Year, (2) The Coming Week, and (3) Astral House Pyramid. The suggestion is made that the reader use the Coming Year reading first, so that the Seeker's long term energy has time to be absorbed. I am fascinated by this method, as the reader ends up with four cards for each month, which are then interpreted together. One card is drawn for each month, then the cards are remixed, and the next round is drawn. Quite interesting! For the coming week, seven cards are drawn, mixing the cards between draws, with the Seeker concentrating on what is going on in their life. The cards are read as a whole, as a story, rather than as individual days.

The Astral House Pyramid begins with the Seeker picking an Astral House card that represents the area of their life that they want to know more about. Underneath this card are placed three lines of cards – two cards in the first line, three cards in the second line, and four cards in the third line. Each line represents things that could happen within that number of days, weeks or months. Sample readings are presented for each of the three spread types. The imagery in the cards is presented in a very gentle, “Currier & Ives” type manner, circular in nature, to fit in with the card itself. The edges blend into the card, rather than standing out against it. Symbols are diverse, including Angel, Apple, Axe, Bat, Bread, Butterfly, Candle, Claw, Harp, Nest, Older Man, Older Woman, Torch, Wheel and Wreath. I found the depth of symbols to represent life and its issues and situations very well. Anyone, from any background, could read well with these cards. It is a fun system to work with, but it is also accurate. (My readings did reflect what was going on in my life, and my clients’ lives.) Whether reading the cards for pleasure, or looking for specific answers, the Tea Leaf Fortune Cards have wonderful insight to offer!

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


"The drinking of tea and the reading of tea leaves to divine the future are so intertwined that the history of one cannot be told without the other," starts the book that accompanies this unique oracle deck. If you've ever been interested in reading tea leaves but found memorizing the 500+ symbols daunting, this deck has condensed the most frequently found tea leaf symbols and incorporated them into a clever deck that mimics the tea leaf reading experience. With round cards that are designed to represent round teacups (and keywords/phrases to help you springboard into a reading), this pleasant deck will create a unique reading experience with some surprising results.

An actual soft-cover instruction book is included, 98 pages of high quality matte stock paper. This book is a dramatically improved version of the previous book from the first printing, with new pictures of actual tea leaf readings and much more detailed interpretations of the card symbols. The meanings of the cards are expanded in the book, based on traditional tea leaf interpretations that have been passed down through generations.

The most unique trait of this deck is the clever shape of round cards to mimic teacups. The packaging of this deck is gorgeous; I am not sure how something of such quality slipped through at such a low price. There is a *lot* here for the price.

I have had some great fun with this deck. I was originally introduced to it by my own psychic, who gave me a whopper of a reading with it several years ago, sending me on a wild goose chase on the Internet to find one for myself. At the time, the deck was out of print and selling for over a hundred dollars in many forums. What a delight that it is back in print and very affordable. This is a completely unique oracle system, and can be used independently or in conjunction with other oracles such as runes, angel cards, or tarot cards. While it is a friendly deck with some delightful cards, you will also find some difficult cards that mirror many of the tough situations we come to a reading to explore (real life!).

This deck is a bounty, and you get more than what you pay for. I love that there are no borders, and the smaller size of the cards makes them easy to handle. The colors are both rustic (to match the feel of tea leaf history) and bright. From front to back, this deck is an excellent production and very fun to use in readings.

Donnaleigh De LaRose, Divine Whispers

$29.95
Beginner's Guide to Tarot
Beginner's Guide to Tarot

What customers are saying about Beginner’s Guide to Tarot

I cannot praise this deck highly enough, not just for its outstanding artwork but for the numerous practicalities of its presentation. Indeed, all involved deserve a lot of praise. The deck can only be bought as part of a fairly lavish package, titled the Beginners Guide to the Tarot. Not only would the book still be an asset to anyone's Tarot library, no matter how advanced, the whole glorious package retails for around the price of a standard U.S. Games tarot deck, making it in my book just about the best bargain I've ever added to my collection.

In terms of presentation, the book is teaming with monochrome illustrations taken from the deck itself. A particularly nice touch however, is that dark blue ink, rather than black has been used both for text and illustrations, making the whole presentation much softer on the eye. Moving on to the proper content of this set, it really is difficult to know where to start - mainly because there's just so much that's good and down to earth practical. It's probably best to start with the book. Juliet Sharman Burke is a full time teacher of both Tarot and Astrology. She is a very good teacher and this book, I feel is her best offering to date. She is a total no - nonsense, level-headed tarot practitioner and the perfect guide for the novice while being able to offer new insight to the more advanced in the same breath. I had always loved the Tarot and been fascinated by it's imagery. When I bought this set and followed the course through I became a good reader as opposed to just a dabbler. For the first time I had a very solid and practical foundation to build on.

Each card is described in individual detail but there are also general overviews of the Majors as a whole and of each suit. She starts with the Minor Arcana, which in itself is a brilliant move. You don't even get to the Majors until you've learned all of these card meanings, done sample readings with each suit on its own, then a reading using all four together. You then learn the Majors, do a Majors only reading and finally a reading with the whole deck. Individual card descriptions are detailed but never labourious. Each card gets more or less a full page and is accompanied by a monochrome reproduction of the card itself which is diagrammatically annotated with key points and handy tips.

Sharman - Burke has devised this deck more or less along the lines of the Rider - Waite but she also draws on the other traditional decks such as the Visconti Sforza and the Marseilles. What results is almost an objectified Rider deck - she debunks all of Waite's subjective occult imagery and replaces it with easier to understand symbols. Hence, Waite's rather obscure Alchemical Wheel of fortune is replaced by the more traditional Fortuna and her Wheel. Also, numbers are absent from the Major cards. This does away with any arguments over card ordering and leaves you to form your own conclusions. When did it ever matter whether Strength was card 8 or 11 to a novice anyway?

A similar pattern follows through the Minor Arcana, which if anything are even richer in detail than Colman Smith's whilst remaining true to her basic imagery. For me, Juliet Sharman-Burke is the only person who has managed to achieve this. What also helps is that each suit has its own consistent color scheme, making the cards instantly recognizable. Colors are related to elements and the elemental attributions are standard - Pentacles - Earth. Swords - Air. Wands - Fire. Cups - Water.

As to purely artistic concerns, the deck, though devised by Juliet Sharman-Burke in every detail was painted by Giovanni Casselli. Its a masterpiece of line and wash style which is elegant, refined and manages to totally avoid the comic strip style trap that many decks can fall into. It really is a gorgeous deck that can hold its own with the best of the rest.

Although aimed at beginners, this package is far more than just an introductory course. It is a timeless deck and book that will continually provide pleasure and insight no matter how far advanced you are. As such it should be a required acquisition to any serious collection as well as the best recommended starting point for anyone interested in learning the art of Tarot.

—Chris Butler, Tarot author and illustrator

$24.99
Conscious Spirit Oracle Deck
Conscious Spirit Oracle Deck

What customers are saying about Conscious Spirit Oracle

Oh what a lovely deck!  I’m intrigued by the idea behind this deck and I have been exploring possibilities!  My first impression of this deck was that each of the 44 cards is a Journey within a bigger Journey.  The card backs are full of interesting symbols too: The Seven Chakras, Phases of the Moon, Sacred Geometry, The Tree of Life and Angel Wings.  Look closer and you will see that the Chakras have ribbons of color that show you what area you’re working with.  For Example the Root Chakra Symbol’s ribbon of color flows downward into the Earth where you see tree roots.  I like this image and I feel it represents the deck perfectly.  The box is flip top and comes with 44 cards and a 44-page guidebook.  The image on the front of the box is card 24 Third Eye Chakra and the image on the back is card 18 Air Elemental. When you look up your card in the guidebook you will see an expanded interpretation or what I would consider advice. 

Kim Dreyer numbered these cards in the order that will take you on a Journey to finding your unique path.  She cautions that this isn’t a quick fix and the guidance they offer requires input and work.  “The cards were designed to gently and lovingly share their wisdom and the wisdom of the universe with you, allowing you to find your soul’s purpose and in so doing, raise the energy of earth and bring about healing, compassion, and love for all life.”

I can’t help but feel that this deck will speak to many who will be guided by the gentle energy and wisdom it holds.  The images are gentle on the eye, beautiful and layered in a unique way that I think most people will find intriguing.  Overall, I like this deck and I especially like the way the artist has shared her vision with us. 

I’m unable to pick a favorite card because each one seems to speak volumes and I like them all! 

—Mary Nale, Nale and Company blogspot


I love the spirit of this deck, with its dramatic images and compelling messages. Each scene creates an enchanting atmosphere or world that pulls me into its depths, making these cards perfect for meditation or an inspirational daily or weekly draw. I am looking forward to trying them with some of my favorite tarot spreads as well. The deck reflects universal themes and experiences yet also has a highly personal feel that is certain to give it broad appeal.

The cards can be grouped as follows:

•   Chakras (5-Root, 10-Sacral, 13-Solar Plexus, 17-Heart, 20-Throat, 24-Third Eye, 26-Crown)

•   Elementals (6-Earth, 14-Fire, 18-Air, 11-Water)

•   Archangels (9-Raphael, 16-Michael, 22-Gabriel)

•   Triple Goddess(19-A Nurturing Heart-Mother, 38-Forest Frolic-Maiden, 39-Flames of Wisdom-Crone)

•   Other Characters (8-The Healer, 25-Spirit Guides, 33-Sun Goddess, 34-Earth Angel, 35-Nature Spirits, 41-Moon Goddess)

•   Concepts/Messages: (1-Spirit Awareness, 2-Meditation, 3-Transformation, 4-Gratitude, 7-Sacred Space, 12-Reach Out, 15-Find Your Bliss, 21-Your Own Path, 23-The Present, 27-Spark of Divine, 28-Release, 29-Balance, 30-Reach for Your Dreams, 31-Embrace Change, 32-Movement Meditation, 36-Abundance, 37-Crystal Ascension, 40-At Day's End-Rest, 42-Wheel of Life, 43-Celebrate Life, 44-Integration

Dreyer's art clearly expresses her "passionate interest in the supernatural, fantasy, and esoteric world as well as a deep love of nature." Colors are vibrant and varied, ranging from cool to warm in shades of purple, blue, green, red, orange, yellow, and brown. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel and are alive with movement and mood. Animals play an important role in many of the images. For example, a zebra is depicted in 29-Balance, a deer in 4-Gratitude, cats in 40-At Day's End-Rest, a bear in 8-The Healer, and a wolf in 19-A Nurturing Heart-Mother. Each chakra is personified in a beautiful woman and the card is painted in the color associated with that chakra.

—Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


In her introduction, Dreyer states that this deck was created to honor, celebrate, and reconnect to Nature, Spirit, and the Divine Feminine in all her forms: the angel, fairy, goddess, the maiden, mother, and crone. The cards in this deck were arranged to  take the reader on a sequential journey to help the reader to awaken and discover their own unique path.

The cards are meant to assist an individual in making lifestyle changes that bring them into alignment with their higher self.  The cards are meant to gently share their wisdom with you, as well as the wisdom of the universe, allowing the reader to find their soul purpose.

The cards themselves are 3 ½” by 5 ¼”, with a matte finish. The backs shown Dreyer’s diverse background as a fantasy artist and graphic designer, with interests in the supernatural, fantasy, and esoteric, along with her love of nature. The colors are the colors of the chakra system (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and purple). The imagery includes the Tree of Life, the seven chakras, the moon cycles, and more.

The card faces show a 1.4” beige border, with the card number and name across the top in black lettering against a yellow background, with an affirmation in the “voice” of card along the bottom, in the same black lettering against a yellow background. The images are beautifully done in pastels, with a fantasy look to them. Elemental symbols are placed in the four corners of each card.

I love the imagery in this deck – the Fire Elemental show a female figure standing, with her arms outstretched, in a red dress. Flames are coming from her hands, flames surround the hem of her dress, and back light her head and upper body. The Archangel Gabriel shows a female figure, with blond hair, dressed in white, with white wings. In her right hand she carrier a bouquet of white flowers.

From the introduction:

“The purpose of these cards is also to awaken you to the beautiful, unique Human being that you are and to remind you that you have valuable gifts and lessons to share with all of humanity.”

 —Bonnie Cehovet


Honoring angel, fairy, goddess, maiden, mother, and crone, these 44 elegantly beautiful cards capture the power of spirit infusing the earth plane. The magical environment of each card summons the observer to join the lady who inhabits that environment and participate in the celebration of the particular wisdom which she represents.

Meditated on sequentially, the cards create a journey, from awakening to integration, which is filled with wisdom and enlightenment. Individually, each card is a trigger which releases intuitive  information and insight. This deck is a delight and your muses and spirit helpers will love it as much as you do.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com
$17.95
The Lover's Path Tarot
The Lover's Path Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT LOVER'S PATH TAROT

$21.95
MUDRAS For Awakening The Energy Body
MUDRAS For Awakening The Energy Body

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT Mudras For Awakening The Energy Body

Mudras For Awakening the Energy Body is a deck and book set that I have had my eye on for months now, before it was even released out onto the market. The production value by U.S. Games here is way high. If yoga, meditation, or Eastern mysticism is of any interest to you, then I recommend that you get this deck.

The book is not just an accompaniment to the cards, but is an independent text all on its own, covering Eastern mystic energy body and chakra principles to the auric field and the hand mudras categorized by the chakras they stimulate. The book itself is 111 pages, a matte finish cover, and perfect bound. The book does a fantastic job explaining hand mudras to the Western reader, so I won’t get too much into it. You have to get Mudras and read it for yourself. Seriously. Best comprehensive explanation ever. In a nutshell, though, Eastern mystics believe that metaphysical energy can be transferred and transmuted through your hands in very potent ways, and hand mudras are formations of the hands and fingers that serve very specific metaphysical functions. In terms of inner alchemy, which is really what this text Mudras focuses on without actually using that term “inner alchemy,” you can use hand mudras along with meditation, mindfulness, and other practices to align, correct and stimulate your personal energy body.

There are so many uses these cards could serve, given the brilliant, bold coloring. You’ll see that the cards are double-sided, meaning there are no “card backs” as you might find in traditional oracle decks. One side covers one of the chakras or hand mudras, and the other side offers text to explain the chakra or mudra. So you can use these cards as a learning deck, to educate yourself.

Next, the hand mudra cards are color coded by the chakras they stimulate.

I love the conciseness of the information and the way it is organized. It’s very easy on the eyes and enables the data to be quite digestible. You’ll note that the information on all of these cards are found verbatim in the accompanying book. Thus, deck and book can be used as standalones. If you want to learn, you can take just the book around with you to study hand mudras. Or you can work with just the cards. And if you only have the cards, it’s okay; you don’t actually need the book to look up any information. All the info you would need is right there on the card. I really love the bright colors of these cards. They bring such a feeling of energy and calm.

Then you turn over the cards for more information. Use the “Focus” affirmations to guide your mindfulness. Incorporate the mudras themselves into your yoga or meditation practices. Note the contents of each card and how you might use that information to work on where you are right now in terms of your spiritual path.

I found it quite cool that, randomized and drawing the cards out with eyes closed, the sequence of cards per chakras kind of follow the mind, body, and spirit sequence. Having a sacral chakra mudra card appear for my mind suggests needing to focus on individuality right now. The root chakra for body makes sense, as does the crown chakra for spirit. You’re going to find the same beautiful synchronicities for yourself when using these cards. There’s definitely a strong calming, spiritual energy about this deck that you can’t help but absorb.

Benebell Wen, author of Holistic Tarot

$22.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Book
Deviant Moon Tarot Book

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT BOOK

I’ve used the Deviant Moon Tarot deck, both with and without borders, for the better part of seven years. When it first came out I had questions about some of the minutiae in the imagery. So I corresponded with Patrick Valenza. I was surprised with his willingness to share portions of the story with me and fascinated with what he shared with me.

Those early conversations with Patrick revealed that this was not a deck rushed to market like so many other decks these days, and I was left wanting to know more about how the drawings matured. 

Then I began to hear rumors about a book.

On Christmas Eve, the postman dropped off a package. Upon opening it my first thought was, “When US Games Systems does something, they do it right”. It is a stunning book. It’s beautiful. The hardback full-color embossed cover, the weight of the paper – it is a four pound, three hundred forty page adventure for your eyes and mind.

This is the new standard in tarot companion books, and like the deck, it was not rushed to market. You can tell that it was created with love.

This is not just a book that’s about a deck. It is a book that demonstrates the evolution of the Art and the Artist, and it takes us on that evolutionary journey.

This is a book for art students and artists who will appreciate and grow from the shared journey. This is a book for people who would like to understand the dark and the fantastic.

This is a book for people who love the Deviant Moon Tarot, want to see what’s behind the curtain, and have the rest of the story revealed.

Patrick joyfully recounts his creation process, and how his organic and narrative approach to art is the result of thirty years development. He shows us his edits, the images rejected, and entertains us with the stories of creation.

Please don’t clear off a spot on your bookshelf for this book as it won’t be there collecting dust. Its beauty and the heirloom quality of its content will be appreciated time and time again when left out in the open to enjoy and inspire.

—Dan Pelletier, Tarot Garden


It’s almost inevitable that everyone who has ever purchased Patrick Valenza’s game-changing Deviant Moon tarot has said, or heard it uttered: “so where’s the companion book?”

Since its launch in 2008, the Deviant Moon has been one of the most talked-about decks of modern times, as fans endlessly pore over its haunting, marionette-like figures. What do the half-awake, half-dreaming faces mean? And what about the digital textures used throughout?

Deviant Moon fans so far have had to rely on the small booklet supplied with the deck, supplemented by snippets from Patrick himself, who’s a warm and endlessly generous figure on social media. He has long indicated that the deck features details lifted from gravestones and abandoned buildings throughout Long Island and Brooklyn. Fans also know that Patrick was born with an unusually precocious artistic gift, and began preliminary work on the Deviant Moon as a young teenager – but it’s only with the publication of this book that we finally get the whole story.

And what a book it is: weighing in at more than four pounds and nearly three years in the making, U.S. Games and Patrick have teamed up to create not an average tarot how-to, but a vast and sumptuous art book.

It’s sheer size is the first thing that strikes you. This is not a book you’ll slip into a small bag: it’s hefty. But once you’ve got over that, you delve in and immediately realise that size isn’t the only thing that’s supersized here: everything about this book is turned up to 11, to quote from the immortal This is Spinal Tap.

Every card in the deck is rendered in rich colour at full-page size, which in itself is an incredible treat for Deviant Moon fans. The cards aren’t small by any means, but the sheer amount of detail they contain means that sometimes, seeing them bigger really is better. Just exploring the images at such a size, and so beautifully printed, is a wonder. But what really gives this book depth, authenticity and meaning, is the backstory Patrick shares with us.

It turns out that you can’t tell the story of the Deviant Moon without telling the life of Patrick Valenza, and vice versa. The two are irrevocably intertwined, and so to understand the deck’s genesis, we also need to see some of Patrick’s earliest childhood art, charting its development into the genius we see today. As well as childhood art, the book also reveals unseen character sketches, alternative card ideas that didn’t make the cut, and of course, the buildings and gravestones whose images and textures pepper the deck.

As you’d expect, both upright and reversed meanings are given for each card, but there’s so much more. In addition, you might learn about how an image was inspired by a childhood dream, how a card was assembled from images of pieces of metal, how Major Arcana figures can be found in childhood form in the Minors and of course, learn about the legendary chess set Patrick created just for the Ten of Pentacles.

If you’re a confirmed Deviant Moon fan, you might think you already know a lot about this deck, but trust me – there’s far, far more to learn. If the deck is totally new to you, then investing in this book, along with a set of the cards, will see you on a journey of discovery that’s bound to bring you delight for years to come. It’s so much more than ‘just’ a book: this is a tangible labour of love into which the author has poured his heart and soul, not to mention decades of work. For its part, U.S. Games has done a fantastic job as publisher in backing Patrick’s creative vision and by justifying every penny you’ll spend on this book.

It might be more than a tad unwieldy, but this is every inch a luxury, heirloom publication, from the crackle-glaze cover to the brilliant, fake-advert endpapers and above all, the quality of the paper stock and the printing. Every character from the Deviant Moon comes alive with colour and as a fan you can spend hours absorbed, not just in the book, but in the brilliantly-realised esoteric universe Patrick has created.

The saying goes that good things come to those who wait – and this is so much more than a good thing. It’s a unique, beautiful and important thing, epitomising what can be achieved when a creative genius with a truly unique idea is given the time and space to express that idea by a supportive publisher.

—Kate Large, Editor-in-Chief, Pagan Dawn Magazine


There is something about a book that is magical and timeless. Its ability to transport us to different times and places, or into the mind perspective and imagination of another person is nothing short of miraculous. And yet still, there are some books that are further set apart from the others by their dazzling, memorable magic and unforgettable journeys.

The Deviant Moon Tarot is an absolutely decadent dessert full of succulently sinful wonders. And for all its richness, it won't make your waist any thicker, though it will brighten dark corners of your day and satiate your appetite for more. If you have fallen in love with the Deviant Moon Tarot, the book about the deck is an absolute must-have that will add much insight to the details in your deck.

The cover has an embossed glossy sheen and a slightly raised texture when one's fingers are brushed across its cover. You will be tempted to massage the cover as I was. When you move the book in the light, moonlight dances across the raised embossing and shards of light glint off the gold and silver embellishments. The inside covers of this book features an aged, rustic newsprint-look. Several hilarious spoofs of advertisements feature Valenza's curious crew of caricatures. The paper quality of this book's pages is exquisite, smooth like cream, with a rich, clear sheen to the ink. The pages are not pure white, but instead have a faint digital texture that resembles parchment paper. This is a high quality book through and through.

This book's content is centered around Valenza's actual creation of the Deviant Moon Tarot deck, how it was created and how to read it. You'll enter the mind of the author and go on a wild ride of beings that reside on the side of dreams. Valenza's well-loved tarot deck is one of the most popular modern decks available today.

Through this book, you'll learn about the birth of the unique characters in the deck, many by happy accidents and others through very conscious shifting of designs. He also describes pieces and items found within the cards that add to meanings. I was surprised to learn that he would often craft clay items of things found in his deck to assist in his drawing process, and photographs of these crafts are included.  

The book explains in delightful detail how each card image was inspired, and this is where I found the true magic unfold. Many of the images originated when Valenza was just a boy and he includes photographic images of his original childhood sketches along with images of the structures that created the textures he used in the cards. Valenza includes a generous section for every card about both upright as well as reversed meanings. Readers will find the depth of this information invaluable to their readings.

The Major and Minor Arcana cards are treated with equal weight with the generous portions of information provided. Want more? Every card explanation is accompanied by a gorgeous, large, full-page and full-color image of each card in the deck, larger than life and with astounding color, textures and details. You'll see things in this book that didn't make it into the deck: a peek backstage! These gorgeous images surpass even the beauty of the images in his deck because with the increased size is increased clarity and detail.

This book would make a wonderful gift (even to oneself!) and it makes a strikingly proud and intriguing display on a coffee table. It can be read in long bouts of book binges, or in short spurts of daily breaks. I read it behaving much like I do when I'm starved for a good meal and I can't decide whether to wolf it down as fast as possible or to enjoy every delectable microsecond of its delicacy in slow motion. I was constantly torn between the impulse to binge and the realization that there were thousands of textures, tastes and details to focus on...my heart definitely started to beat faster with great glee as I turned the pages.

—Donnaleigh de LaRose, Beyond Worlds Tarot podcast

$39.95
Mystical Wisdom Card Deck
Mystical Wisdom Card Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MYSTICAL WISDOM CARD DECK:

The Mystical Wisdom deck is a treasure of an oracle. Josephine Wall is a favorite fantasy artist of mine. Her works are beautiful, soothing, inspiring, and wonderful for divination. The more you look at each work, the more details you see. U.S. Games has done a spectacular job taking these incredible pieces of art and making them into a deck. The first thing you notice is the sturdy box, with the full color design that U.S. Games does so well. The cards are oversized, just enough to give you the full effect of the intricate details of the art, but still comfortable to handle and shuffle. They chose to leave off borders which also suits the art work very well. You feel drawn into the images, as if your vision goes on beyond the cards (as well it should). The card stock is perfect; you won't get curling with use. The back of the cards are a dreamy soft pink and yellow design, reversible except for the publishers stamp. The booklet is sturdy as well, with a beautiful full color cover. This will most certainly hold up over time.

There were no corners cut in the publishing of this deck, and I think that the high quality shows a great deal of respect for the art. The cards are a collection of arch angels, animal spirits, advice and inspiration. The book is written by Gaye Guthrie, and she does a wonderful job of taking you deep into each card and drawing out it's mystical significance. She notes in the introductory paragraphs that "The purpose of the Mystical Wisdom cards is not to endorse fear of the unknown, but to inspire and uplift you by bringing peace and comfort when times are challenging and also at times when life is joyful." This is a deck you can trust to guide you in hard times. It will offer comfort, hope and advice. I know I will be turning to it in the future both for myself and my clients.

I definitely recommend buying a copy of this deck; I really feel that it will hold it's value both as a collector's item and as a useful divination tool and accompaniment.

—Jill Scott, Tarot Marketplace


$22.95