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Celestial Tarot Deck
Celestial Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE CELESTIAL TAROT DECK:

Artist/astrologer Kay Steventon and author/lecturer Brian Clark together have created a stunning blend of the myths and symbols of astronomy with the tool of astrological divination. The mysteries that are the Tarot emerge in a very different manner, one that is unique and empowering. It is a guide to the heavens, as well as a guide to our inner selves.

While this deck follows the traditional structure of the Tarot (the Major Arcana retain their traditional titles, with Strength as VIII and Judgment as XI; the suits are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles; the Court Cards are King, Queen, Prince, and Princess), it is overtly based on the traditions of astronomy, astrology, and mythology.

The twenty-two cards of the Major Arcana are represented by the twelve zodiacal constellations and the ten planets of contemporary astrology. In the Minor Arcana, we encounter what the author terms "extra-zodiacal" constellations. The Minor Arcana us divided into decants, with the thought of adding insight and symbolism to each card. In the Court Cards, the Princesses each embody a season, while the Prince, Queen and King each embody the fixed, mutable, and cardinal signs of each element. The artwork is stunning, and strongly carries the character of fantasy. Toss in astrological and elemental symbology, along with Hebrew letters, and this deck rocks! I loved going through the cards and looking for the symbols and the intricate details. The overall tone is a little dark, as far as coloring goes, with deep blue/lavender backgrounds, with imagery in gold, white, lighter lavender, blues and greens, with some bronze/red. It is very hard for me to pick favorite cards with this deck, as I like so many of them! The Fool certainly stands out: associated with the planet Uranus, the Fool is seen as acting suddenly and unexpectedly. He is shown as a small, naked figure against the night sky, arms up and in an apparent freefall. The lower half of the card appears to be a choppy sea, with the shoulders, head, and upraised arm of a male figure shown in the upper half, against a light lavender background. Celestial Tarot is a deck for those who want to work with astrological associations, or those who are interested in myth. This deck certainly could be used for readings, but it would also work well for meditation and journeying.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


This is a complicated, though breathtaking, deck design. It will probably suit the more astrologically minded among us, and those with a good working understanding of Greek mythology. Each Major Arcana card is given either a planetary or zodiacal attribution. Each suit is assigned to its traditional Element, and each pip also has a mythological figure or a constellation associated with it. The images are generally dictated by sections of the myth in question -- for example, the 9 of Swords is associated with Canis Minor, and the image shows us a dog glancing back over his shoulder. Superimposed upon him is the shape of the constellation named for him, and the astrological symbol of Gemini to indicate separation.

The artist who created this deck is Kay Steventon, who brought us the fantastic Spiral Tarot, working in collaboration with Brian Clark. They have gone on to produce an oracular deck called Ancient Feminine Wisdom. The images in this deck are evocative and almost ethereal. The complexity of symbol incorporated into each card is astonishing, with occult glyphs from the Hebrew alphabet, the Qabalah and other sources all adding insight into the mind of the artist.

The little booklet that accompanies the deck explains extensively about each of the legends, which were incorporated into the design of the cards. Though some of the given interpretations are somewhat unusual I found them complementary to my existing knowledge -- expanding my view of specific cards. For example, the 4 of Pentacles is described thus "With the 4 of Pentacles, Taurus initiates the individual into the awareness of the boundary separating Earth’s sacred and secular spheres by recognizing the distinction between inner values and outer possessions. When this card appears the individual needs to reflect on his or her relationship with the material realm". Whilst not exactly a classic interpretation, it is one which builds a new dimension of understanding.

This is most definitely not a beginner's deck. But for a more experienced user of Tarot I would suggest that, both as a meditation tool and a working deck, it could definitely have a lot to offer. The accompanying booklet is very well written and extensive. If you liked the Spiral Tarot, you'll love this one, especially if you have an interest in astrology and Greek myth.

-- Jan Shepherd, Angel Paths

$21.95
Dragon Tarot
Dragon Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DRAGON TAROT:

When I first became interested in reading the tarot, the one thing that I had a problem with was finding a deck that suited my feelings and represented ME. Then one day I stumbled upon the Dragon deck, and I felt like my prayers had been answered! The artwork and symbolism, combined with the rich history, myth, and mystique that surrounds dragons in general, turned out to be just what the doctor ordered. The use of many rich colors was something that I felt, at that point in time, many other decks didn't seem to have (although now I know otherwise). But, my absolute favorite part about this deck are the Major Arcana. They were (and still are) like nothing I had ever seen before. The capture all the symbolism of traditional tarot decks, but they also contain a draconic twist that is sometimes a bit funny (in particular, the Hanging Dragon card!).

All in all, the Dragon Tarot was the first deck I ever owned, and it remains my favorite to this day. I highly suggest this deck to anyone who doesn't feel connected to the more traditional decks, and longs for something deeper. It is very hard to put into words all that I feel with this deck, so you may be better off experiencing its power for yourself, but believe me, you won't regret it! Again, I have seen many decks in my days, but none of them compares to the power and imagery of the Dragon Tarot!

-- Charlie Taylor, on Aeclectic Tarot


I absolutely LOVE this deck. The images are beautiful and powerful and readings are very accurate for me. A friend of mine did one reading with my cards and has decided he wants a deck of his own. It is a very strong deck, but "welcoming," almost like coming home. If you like dragons, you will most likely connect with this deck and may keep it as your personal deck.

-- Kelli Riffle, on Amazon


Gorgeous artwork! This is the kind of deck that speaks to anyone with a love for dragons and dragon lore. I fell in love with it when it first came out, and I haven't used another Tarot deck since.

-- Nathalie Wigmore, on Amazon


I just received this deck and already love it! The dragons are most elegant, intelligent, powerful but not *terrifying*! The combination of dragons and Tarot symbolism may not always be clear for Tarot beginners, but Tarot folks who have a little imagination and love dragons will delight in this deck, and they will come to understand and value its unique messages. I did not care for the Celtic Dragon deck, think it's a bit sappy. By contrast, Pracownik's work has sophistication and edge, and the dragons are just simply gorgeous.

-- Eva A. on Amazon


The Dragon Tarot follows the now traditional path of a 78 card deck.

Each card is individually illustrated with dragons and adheres loosely to the Rider Waite deck for its' imagery.

So what's it like to use the Dragon Tarot? I love it!!!! Colorful, charming, quirky but full of dragon fun and humor. Both the reader and querent will enjoy the use of this deck. The dragon appeals to all with the mystery and beauty. I feel the Dragon Tarot takes us back to a more innocent time. A time perhaps of legend, when man and dragon shared this world. You decide when you take up the challenge of the Dragon Tarot.

-- Kelvin Black, on Tarot Canada

$21.95
Tarot of the Witches Deck
Tarot of the Witches Deck

What customers are saying about Tarot of the Witches:

I personally love this deck and it is one of the most frequently used decks for my personal readings. I love the fact that the cards were painted with oils on canvas; the colors are incredibly rich and vibrant and there is a depth and solidity to the images that is rare. There's something psychological here for me as an artist - these feel like the sort of images I would encounter in an art gallery rather than straightforward commercial illustrations. To me this is as much of an art tarot as it is a working deck, which makes me feel good when I handle the cards.

Unlike many of the esoteric decks that are imbued with either breathless solemnity or an almost religious conviction, this one manages to do full justice to the depth and meaning of the age old symbols while somehow not taking itself too seriously. The characters on the cards have a dark, almost camp wit with a slightly sinister edge to them. Everything is wildly out of proportion and ethereally colored yet somehow it all works. If anyone asked me why, I really couldn't say, but the humor in the pictures seems to conceal but invite you to look deeper in the same breath.

I would thoroughly recommend the accompanying Tarot of the Witches book by Stuart R. Kaplan. This gives detailed descriptions of the Major cards and the artist's thinking behind them. Reading this greatly enhanced my appreciation of the deck and its sheer originality.

—Chris Butler, Aeclectic Tarot


This delightful deck has unfortunately been misnamed and mismarketed throughout its existence. It has nothing to do with James Bond or witches but has everything to do with Fergus Hall, the idiosyncratic artist who painted the deck. It should be called simply the Fergus Hall Tarot. Hall got his start doing carnival paintings and that freaky bizarro style shows in this deck. Unlike most 20th century decks, Hall's deck is free of occult or pagan mumbo jumbo and yet is rich in subtle symbolism, such as the mysterious black birds and orange cats that appear on various cards, and the mandala type designs in the center of the pip cards. The books held by the hanged man and hermit contain original poems. (Can't read them? See Stuart Kaplan's companion book). The art is very expertly done and yet is so whimsical and unassuming it's easy to take for granted. The World card is one of the best I've ever seen, downright haunting. This is a very profound deck but at the same time doesn't take itself too seriously. The pip cards are a welcome return to tradition, using the original suits of cups, swords, batons, and coins rather than the recently introduced "wands" and "pentacles" which many mistakenly consider authentic. Also, as in traditional decks, the pips are unillustrated save for Hall's central mandalas. In my opinion, unillustrated pips leave more room for the reader’s own imagination and insight.

A perfect blend of tradition and creativity. You might find this deck puzzling at first, but stick with it. There's an entire little world in every card!

—A. Simone, Amazon customer


These tarot cards should really be known as the Fergus Hall deck.
Many people are familiar with this deck due to its use in the James Bond movie, "Live and Let Die". But it is far more than that.
Abandoning all efforts to reproduce the Rider Waite Tarot, Hall has created a deck with some of the most surreal, yet highly mystical art ever seen on Tarot cards.
Those who are familiar with Tarot cards know that many different interpretations of cards are possible by seeing the imagery on the cards. Hall's imagery isn't for everyone, but I believe the art really draws you into readings in a whole new way.
I have also found this deck invaluable for dream interpretation.
The Minor Arcana return to the old "pip" system.
One of my higher recommendations if you are already doing readings for others.

—Bruce Gray, Amazon customer


I think this deck is absolutely wonderful. You have to use your own imagination and find your own meanings to the symbolism...which in my opinion is what tarot cards are all about. For those of you who want a deck that lays out plainly what the cards mean, then this is not for you. If you have a good imagination and enjoy the type of artistry used in this deck you wont be disappointed.

—Joe Arthur, Amazon customer

$21.95
Medieval Cat Tarot
Medieval Cat Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MEDIEVAL CAT TAROT:

When I heard of the Medieval Cat Tarot I was a little skeptical. I would have thought the market for cat decks was becoming rather crowded and that it would be hard to make an impression, but the Medieval Cat Tarot manages to stand out with its novel blending of traditional and modern imagery and style.

I was pleasantly surprised when I opened the box and began to examine the cards. They are glossy, smooth and very polished in appearance; a little longer and thinner than usual cards but very easy to handle and with a nice feel. The cards were inspired by fifteenth century art, and have the look of the historical Visconti-Sforza. The very consistent artistic style was created by Lawrence Teng, who also worked together with Gina M. Pace (Wicce) to complete the companion text.

The Major Arcana cards feature stately cats with bodies in human poses, their head and feet cat-like in shape but palely human in colouring. The symbology has a traditional foundation, but has been stripped down and reduced of clutter. The Minor Arcana take a new direction and combine modern and standard styles. They appear to be traditional looking pip cards in the background, but in the centre have a kind of porthole. Here, a RWS-style scene has been condensed down its essentials and shows a medieval cat participating in the activity or feeling of the card. Some scenes have been altered to be more immediately clear and aren't a complete RWS clone, but they somehow seem truer to the meaning. The best card of these cards in my opinion is the Seven of Swords -- a blue-dressed cat stands next to an empty and rocking birdcage, empty of its canary but drifting feathers. Others worth mentioning are the Four of Pentacles, a portly cat holding a ring of keys in front of a heavily padlocked door; the Eight of Wands, where a cat stands poised with a note on the end of an arrow, poised to fly, to name but two.

The major cards have standard Rider-Waite style titles, but are without numbering to avoid the Strength/Justice conundrum. Of note is the Empress, who has the significant addition of children, and she stands in a very Hierophant-like pose with her hands on their hands (though it appears somewhat more caring). The Devil is a fox-like creature, expensively dressed and hiding behind a cat-shaped mask. I particularly like Death, showing as it does a robed Death figure who has a feline skull and jaw. All of the feline figures are elegant and well dressed, and no strong emotion passes their face. They are rarely kitschy and never cute -- above all they are dignified, as a cat should be.

The court cards are titled traditionally, but in imagery are a departure from the traditional. They have been changed to more clearly differentiate between each other, with the element develops from the Pages through to the Kings. Each court figure is dressed in a different period costume, and interacts with their element in a different way.

The booklet is small and staple bound, but includes a satisfying amount of information and meaning for each card in English. The card backs have an almost reversible (they are reversible at a distance) design, though they are intended to be read upright. The Medieval Cat Tarot is simple and clear enough to be an easily readable for the beginner and intermediate reader, while at the same time it is an original and polished deck with links to Tarot's history and European tradition. A deck for the cat lover, the lover of the Renaissance era, and most especially for the Tarot reader.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I thought this would be a light-hearted deck mostly for show. I was wrong. The symbolism is remarkably clear and the cat faces don't in any way detract from the ability to take this deck seriously. The images are charming in style, faintly folkart-ish, and it's a very easy deck to read. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants an accessible deck, including those new to tarot.

-- GriffonSong, Amazon customer


I wasn't sure what to expect of this deck, but what I honestly didn't expect was to be as wholly impressed as I am. The cats have not simply been dressed in Renaissance garb or put in tarot poses. They have been depicted to demonstrate precise meanings for the cards, with depth and accuracy. They are not overly cute; rather, they gaze out from the cards with often serious looks of contemplation, and expressiveness that is shown mostly in their eyes. Also, they are not all cat but somewhat human, with human shapes, and hands. One does not have to be a big cat lover to enjoy the deck -- the cats as tarot figures are entirely convincing.

Though the illustrations are based largely on the Rider-Waite, the cards depend on their own imagery. And this they do very well. For example, in the Eight of Swords, a cat stares wide-eyed out from behind bars, which are further blocked by a chain and lock. A key dangles near the cat, though he doesn't notice it. A cat sits with arms crossed in front of his chest in the Four of Cups, three ignored cups before him, and a fourth cup being offered to him on a tray. His gaze is cast to the side. The miserliness of the Four of Coins is indicated in many locks on a cat's door. He holds a ring of keys, but the task of opening the door looks tedious. The sense of being overly cautious, protecting or guarding what one has, is obvious. The little booklet explains the card with good balance: "The Four of Coins shows where we feel threatened by what we have experienced in the past; our security is exercised in overkill because our perception of danger or struggle is much more than the reality. We may actually be safe, but we still feel intimidated. We must realize that our foundation has been laid securely and we may now build upon it." Another good example of this effective use of simple imagery is the Three of Wands, in which our cat holds a small ship in one hand, a telescope in the other. The text that interprets this card for us says, "The Three of Wands symbolizes the ability to see what it is that we are launching and to put it into motion. We carry with us the small tokens that remind us that we are responsible for putting our own ships out to sea if we wish to see our ships return overflowing with prosperity and abundance." The pictures are incredibly clear in meaning, but the artwork is purposeful, rich, and ornate. Interpretation and understanding are accessible, while the aesthetic experience is fully rewarding.

The Majors are not numbered. The artist states simply, "Some of the first tarot decks did not include numerology symbols or a numbering system in the Major Arcana. I have chosen that same omission for Medieval Cat Tarot. As there is some interchangeability with a few of the Majors (most often Strength and Justice), this allows the reader to use the cards at his or her discretion." I will just note -- for those who might be starting out -- that this does not make using the cards any more difficult. A traditional ordering of the cards is presented in the booklet. Most of the Majors stick to expected imagery, though often with a whimsical or lighthearted air -- The Hanged Man reminds me that cats always land upright from a fall, because the featured cat here does not exactly hang upside down as is standard -- he looks ready to land safely if he falls. This seems to intend a hopeful aspect of a card that is sometimes misunderstood as frightening or ominous. The grim reaper in Death is surrounded by butterflies, which indicate personal metamorphosis. It is a purely positive element in what some believe is a difficult card. And the Devil is a fox hiding behind a cat's mask, and makes clear the meaning expressed in the booklet: "It is the Devil inside each of us that this card addresses. We are our own worst enemy -- we bedevil ourselves at the times when we undermine our own best efforts to get clear of the repeating patterns of behavior and abuse in our lives. This Devil, for example, hides behind a mask, much as we hide behind our own denial when we fight ourselves on many levels."

Also notable in Medieval Cat Tarot, is the emphasis on the court cards to provide insight into the self, rather than to merely serve as representations of others. These are presented largely as a progression of the self, which stage one might be in, etc. The court cards can still represent another, but they are clearly described as phases in development, and in this way are quite helpful. An included spread, "The Court Cards Curve," is an aid in learning to see the court cards in this way.

Because of the simplicity in symbolism, the deck would be a super choice for someone just starting out. The accompanying booklet offers more than enough instruction on the meanings of each card, along with added insight and clear ideas for interpretation. It is a highly readable, very strong, and well-rounded deck, in image and word. My own readings with it have been highly useful and insightful. I recommend it for everyone -- except perhaps, those who really don't like cats!

-- Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot

$21.95
Tarot of a Moon Garden
Tarot of a Moon Garden

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF A MOON GARDEN:

At first, I wasn't sure I was going to like this deck, but it seemed to just kind of "grow" on me as I began to use it more in Tarot readings -- and clients requested this deck a lot for readings. It's actually a very delightful and charming deck of tarot cards. Each of the cards depicts a night scene, with the exception of the Sun Card, which shows a bright and glorious sunny morning. Some readers dislike this deck because they feel that it's too "cute," however, I think of it more as being a "magical fairyland" type of deck. It is a fun and enchanting deck to read with, once you become accustomed to it. There are no frightening images in this deck, so it's a good choice for the beginning young reader or anyone else that either wants to read the cards or get a reading but is hesitant about the traditional images of most decks. Tarot of a Moon Garden reduces any "harshness" that may be found in some decks.

You'll find delightful images such as flowers, castles, fairies, dolphins, and hot air balloons. Artist Marie Sweikhardt works with the idea that the moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, lush jungles, mysterious caverns, and exotic flowers -- like a lunar Garden of Eden.

It is a soft and gentle deck that follows the Rider-Waite tradition and symbolism but in a much calmer way. It's a deck suitable for reading for or about children as well. Although not the deck for everyone, it's certainly a welcome change for a few moments of escape into an enchanted land of childhood magic. When the mood is whimsical, this can be a very nice deck to turn to. In August 2007, Tarot of Moon Garden was reintroduced and is once again available. So if you missed it during a time of being out-of-print, it's available again.

-- Velvet Angel, on Tarot Wisdom Readings


This imaginative deck weaves traditional images with mythic expression and elemental magic into a 78-card deck full of inspiration and insight. Beautifully illustrated by Karen Marie Sweikhardt this whimsical, full-color deck depicts an enchanted garden with exotic flowers, castles, and hot air balloons. The first thing that grabbed my attention was the colors and dreamlike images and it was a real pleasure to work with. The card stock is terrific and shuffles very easily and the image on the backs are not only reversible but intricate and pleasing to the eye.

The Major Arcana are stunning to look, at depicting fairies, dragons, butterflies and unicorns and even the moon herself makes an appearance in several of the cards. The Minor Arcana have dragonflies for the hilts of the Swords suit, mystical trees in the Staffs suit, there are butterflies, ferns and other foliage in the Cups suit and the Pentacles suit with it's large pentacle orbs floating across it's images. This deck is a delight to look at and definitely a joy to work with and makes a terrific deck for both beginner and experienced alike.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic


The Tarot of a Moon Garden deck was my 8 year-old son's first deck, given to him on his 6th birthday. The cards have been described as very feminine and romantic but we find them, instead, very gentle and magical. It is the perfect first deck for any young witch or wizard or of course for those young at heart.

The cards are easy to read and are filled with beautiful images and great detail. From the moment they're taken out of the box they seem to exude a kind of soft, magical transcendence. For a young reader they're just the thing to open the mind and senses to the "elsewhere".

Reading these cards or having them read for you, transports you to a gentler, more magical time. Every card in the deck, major and minor Arcana alike, brings one closer to a more innocent yet mysterious way of being. Even the death and devil cards are done in such a way as to adhere to the old standards (which I much prefer) and yet convey the message in a gentle, non-frightening way.

One would be hard put to find a better deck for the up and coming spiritual generation. Indeed, my number one recommendation for a child's first set of tarot cards would have to be the Tarot of a Moon Garden.

-- Winter, on Aeclectic Tarot


The moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, mysterious caverns, lush jungles and exotic flowers. Sweikhardt weaves the traditional tarot symbolism into her images of a lunar Garden of Eden where there are dragonflies, butterflies, dolphins, dragons and unicorns around every corner. The inspiration card states Welcome to a Realm Where Myth and Magic are the Reality.

Journey into the Moon Garden and reflect on the phases of the lunar energy. It is a very bright, bold, and colorful deck taking you to a time of magic as it weaves traditional tarot symbolism, mythic expression and elemental magic. A tapestry for you to discover. As Sweikhardt states she started this as a poem, Moon Garden, and from there it blossomed into this wonderful fanciful enchanted deck.

It will soon be, if it is not already, a collector’s item, one you will want for your own collection, or just to have. Great for using and reading children, or for children to explore the Tarot.

-- Sally, on Aeclectic Tarot


My friend bought me a deck of cards as a gift. The deck was The Tarot of the Moon Garden. Immediately I felt soothed by its images of dancing fairies, protective dragons and lush gardens. Every card stirred feelings of hope and dreams achieved, even the cards associated with negative portents such as the Tower or the Devil. This deck is still my favorite and the ideal first set for anyone wishing to explore the mysteries of the Tarot. I find them deeply emotional, describing how events affect the questioner emotionally rather than detailing events. I feel these cards empathize with the questioner, place a comforting hand on their shoulder or join in with the cheers when all is well. They are a positive, gentle deck, eager to find positive results from the most negative events, but not give you a false hope, a false sense of security, keen to show events you'll face, keen to reassure you of their support.

They can be mischievous, I've never found any other deck with such personality, prone to mood swings if they're not treated right giving absolutely nothing to read, deathly silent especially if you query their advice. The fantasy beings depicted sum up perfectly these cards, encouraging the reader to dig deeper into a world of plenty, always offering encouragement. This is a set everyone should read at least once; they bring a rare innocent, childlike quality to an art often daunting when first practiced.

-- Niki, on Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Creative Whack Pack® Deck
Creative Whack Pack® Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CREATIVE WHACK PACK:

Roger von Oech has won a loyal following around the country.

-- BusinessWeek Magazine

$16.00
Vanessa Tarot
Vanessa Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT VANESSA TAROT:

The Vanessa Tarot does for illustrated pip Waite-Colman-Smith based decks, what Major Tom's Tarot de Marseille did for the Marseille version Tarots, and dragged it (the Tarot) into the 21st Century.

The Vanessa Tarot will perhaps be the most overlooked Tarot of 2007. 'Serious' Tarot folks will eschew it, many will never get past the Magician -- and will poo-poo it as a silly novelty. But the Vanessa deserves a closer look. It's nothing short of brilliant!

Let me start with the LWB -- it deserves framing. This should me the new standard for LWB's. It is well written, concise, and is arraigned by numerical value as opposed to suits. And what is said about each card -- makes sense. Some folks enjoy saying 'Tarot is a language', perhaps because such a statement eludes cogent response, However the Vanessa Tarot IS a language. Gone is the weighty esoteric symbology, leaving behind clean image concepts -- that translate smoothly into nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs and articles. Many cards easily fill encompass several of those labels.

Yes, it's a feminine deck albeit not feminist. Marketing may well relegate it to the early teen female market segment of the populations, and that’s a shame. The deck is also multicultural.

Some examples: The 10 of Wands eschews the burdening issues and displays an attitude of study -- or 'workload'. The Knight of Wands wears a parachute and stands in the doorway of an aircraft in flight. In the Four of Cups, she sits in front of the Tarot Café, while a hand enters the picture from the left offering a cup. It's tres mondo coolaroonie!

The cards measure 9.5cm x 6cm, perfect for your hands, and get this ... they come in a metal case.

This deck, and the LWB rock ...

-- Dan Pelletier, Aeclectic Tarot


The Vanessa Tarot is a glamorous and feminine interpretation of tarot into completely modern scenes and symbols. Created by talented Filipino illustrator and multimedia, Lynyrd Narciso, creator of the Sailor Moon Tarot and Tarot of the Lepidopteran People, it is his first deck to be picked up by a major publisher -- U.S. Games Systems.

The deck has been inspired by the heroines of pop culture (Jackie O and Sophia Loren are two recognisable women) and is wholly female, glam, young and modern in all its aspects. The cards were originally inspired by dolls, and in places the women retain a slightly big-eyed, big-headed anime look, but the colours are anything but lady-like, instead using rich, deep colours. They're also images of put-together, strong, capable women. They are judges in Justice, beauty queens in the Universe card, warriors in the Seven of Wands, and fashion designers in the Three of Coins. They ride motorbikes in the Knight of Swords, drive their own sports cards in the Chariot, and bake in the Kitchen in the Magician.

The women of the Vanessa Tarot almost entirely inhabit modern scenes and life in a way few decks have managed. It's not a tarot with a few contemporary scenes mixed in with the usual medieval Christian or occult symbolism, but a tarot that has been translated completely into modern lifestyles and references. Its illustrations include a Knight of Wands, poised to parachute out of a plane; the Knight of Swords riding a motorbike; the Ten of Wands, where a student works at a desk piled high with books, lit only by the glow of a desk lamp.

The cards have the Rider-Waite tradition at their foundation, but often move the scenes towards their more literal interpretations as well as more modern ones. The Queen of Swords in the deck is a veiled woman at a funeral; she is literally the widow or aloof woman. The Seven of Swords removes the ambiguity and shows a woman in the midst of a burglary, getting away with the safe.

The whole Vanessa Tarot set is a beautifully designed package of 78 small, matte, and easily-shuffled cards, 2 title cards, and a similarly small 32-page booklet, carried in a very durable purple tin box (not cardboard!) with a separate lid. Perfect for keeping in handbags, backpacks or purses.

Inside, the cards are about the same size as playing cards and fit easily in small hands. They are easily shuffled as they have a much more matte cardstock than is often usual for decks from US Games, and lack that tendency to slide off the table like a waterfall. The backs of the cards have a simple and reversible design of a purple background with blue stars and thin blue vertical stripes.

I'm a big fan of the Vanessa Tarot and its fun, feminine yet strong approach to tarot, without being flowery or fluffy. Lynyrd has translated conventional tarot scenes into more relevant scenes of contemporary life, making a deck that is easy for beginners to use and relate to without having to deeply delve into the study of tarot symbolism.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


When the Vanessa Tarot arrived in the mail, the first thing I noticed was that I really liked its tin box. What a good idea it is to package a Tarot deck in a box that can actually be used to carry your cards in your purse! And that is when I started to understand Vanessa Tarot's real deal. Yes, this is exactly the deck to carry in your purse. And, if you are like the characters of this Tarot, your purse may be a Coach, a Louis Vuitton, or a khaki backpack or leather briefcase.
 I am in no way a designer girl. In fact, what I am is a crusty old Gloria Steinem-type feminist from the Seventies. But, as I looked through Vanessa Tarot that first time, I had to admit that this is really a special deck.
 Vanessa Tarot is smaller than most, measuring only about 2" by 3," according to my thumb. The card backs are reversible, and done in a nice purple pinstripe with lavender stars. The cardstock has a matte finish, and is of the good quality that we have come to expect from U.S. Games. Overall, it is a nice deck to look at and to hold in your hands. For all of its great quality and special packaging, Vanessa Tarot retails at only $15. That, girls, will leave you some money left over to spend at the mall!


Vanessa Tarot comes with a standard-sized LWB (Little White Book) that gives quick descriptions of the Major Arcana card images, and upright and reversed meanings for all the cards. The Minor Arcana is sorted by numbers rather than suits, and there is a paragraph about each number preceding the interpretations for the four cards of each number set. Each Vanessa Tarot card is illustrated with cartoon-like drawings of women and girls. There are some male figures in the deck, but they are supporting characters. Vanessa Tarot pays tribute to the girls and women of pop culture from today and yesteryear. Television and movie stars make an appearance, as do many "types" of modern women. There are businesswomen, glamour girls and daredevils. They are all either pretty or cute, and all skinny. They are dressed in styles from many periods of fashion.
 The Minor Arcana cards are as detailed as the Majors, which is a feature I appreciate.
 The deck truly won my heart when I saw that my favorite TV character from childhood, Samantha Stevens (Bewitched, played by Elizabeth Montgomery) appears in her classic pose, sitting on her broomstick, as the Eight of Wands.
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I passed the deck around to many of my students. Overall, the reaction was positive. Many felt that this would be a particularly good "first deck" for our daughters. Even some of the more mature students liked it, especially those with an eye for glamour and fashion. One older student, whose favorite expression is "It's all about the outfit!" was particularly taken with it.
 Another great thing about Vanessa Tarot is that none of the images are particularly dark or scary. This would be a great deck for some of the professional bookings that I often get, in nightclubs, at college parties and all-night high school graduation parties. 
And what about my crusty feminist self? Well, bear in mind that the second deck I ever owned was the Motherpeace, and I have a particular penchant for Goddess Tarot decks, such as the beautiful one by Kris Waldherr. But Vanessa Tarot, with all of its cuteness and glamour and designer-type fashion, is the only one I have seen that had the ovaries to make all four Kings female! Yes, all of the main characters are female. And they all seem pretty happy doing what they're doing, whether it’s being dressed to the nines, keeping house or jumping out or an airplane. And if that's not female empowerment, I don't know what is!

-- Christiana Gaudet, Tarot by Christiana

$18.95
Whimsical Tarot Deck
Whimsical Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Whimsical Tarot

The Whimsical Tarot is a lot of fun -- although I originally bought it for my children to use, I found myself drawn to some of the really clever imagery. Hanson-Roberts uses traditional fairy tale characters to portray the divinatory meanings of each card. The Major Arcana, in particular, are well chosen, as are the court cards. This is a great deck to use if you're teaching kids the Tarot, or if you just want to expand your own horizons a bit. The artwork is lovely, and the card associations are clearly thought out. Definitely worth buying, if you enjoy Tarot and classic children's stories!

—Patti Wigington, About.com


Drawn by Mary-Hanson Roberts, who also created the art for the Hanson-Roberts Tarot and the Universal Waite Tarot, the Whimsical Tarot is based on fairy tales and nursery rhymes and intended for children and the 'young at heart'.

But it is by no means limited to children. The fairytales are familiar to almost everyone, the simplicity and already associated meaning with the cards helping to make tarot more accessible to a beginner.

Some of the cards make me chuckle, others I find impressive because of the approachable rendering of normally disliked cards. The Devil card, for example, shows a pair of hands controlling a marionette, a puppet on strings. The Death card is Sleeping Beauty.

I adore the backs of the cards. A lilac flower is in a rectangular focus in the center of the card. Surrounded by a mauve border, then a thicker border of yellow Celtic knot work on a turquoise background, it is restful, appropriate for upright or reversed readings, and very pretty.

I highly recommend the Whimsical Tarot as a child's tarot deck; for people who read for children; or for sensitive souls who aren't keen on confronting images on their tarot cards. The Whimsical Tarot gets the message across without being dark, negative or scary.

I also think it is a good beginners deck, as the fairytales used on each card allow the tarot novice to hang the tarot concepts on a framework they are familiar with. Learning seventy-eight different tarot meanings and how to interpret the tarot symbols can very seem daunting, but the Whimsical Tarot's cards are cute and the scenes already familiar. Hanson-Roberts combined traditional fairytales and tarot make a beautifully presented, sweet, and thoroughly whimsical tarot deck.

—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


She sat down and flipped through the deck, her eyes lighting up as the realized that she recognized all the fairytales and stories within each card. She squealed with excitement when the 4 of Swords reminded her of the Princess and the Pea, and she jumped up and down in her seat happily as the Magician bought back the story of Puss in Boots. When she had finished looking through the deck, she handed it back to me, with a grin from ear to ear adorning her face: My Mother appeared to like the deck.

As can be seen from my Mother's reaction, the Whimsical Tarot is aimed at children and the young at heart. The cards are adorned with fairytales, nursery rhymes, and stories that we were told as children, and as such, there are many adults who can use this deck very effectively. The benefits of using fairytales and such to illustrate the meanings of the cards is that nearly everybody is familiar with most of them, and thus can understand the meaning in the card without having to look in any book. Fairytales bring back fond memories of childhood, and those nights on the sofa with your Granny, when she would make you hot chocolate and then read Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm to you until you were too sleepy to stay awake any longer. The attraction of a deck surrounded by, and based upon, these stories is understandable.

This deck is largely traditional: the names of the cards, the suits of the Minors, the ordering of the Majors, and the meanings of the cards are all Rider-Waite traditional. The only thing that differs is the pictures used to illustrate the cards, as these are taken directly from the fairy stories applied to each card. All of the cards are fully illustrated with the gorgeous artwork of Mary Hanson-Roberts. The Court Cards are particularly appealing, all being characters from stories, with the Queen and King usually being from the same story, eg- King and Queen of Pentacles being Maid Marion and Robin Hood. The Pages in this deck are the most interesting I have come across, and certainly the easiest to understand! Instead of showing people, they show objects, which convey the meaning of the card. For instance, the Page of Swords shows a telescope, and the Page of Pentacles shows gold coins, scales, and a tally-chart. This is a great help, especially for young children and beginners, as it is often the Court Cards that are the most difficult to read.

All the fairytales are well chosen and very evocative. Every other deck I have seen which uses fairytales as its theme has failed in that sometimes the chosen fairytales are chosen superficially, for instance, in one deck I found that the Emperor card was represent by the Emperor's New Clothes, which really didn't have anything to do with the meaning at all. With this deck, that's not the case: Every single card's fairytale is chosen for its meaning and significance. That is an achievement within itself I think, and something that this deck deserves praise for.

I love this deck. It is the best one I have seen which is aimed at children, but which also proves to be an excellent deck for adults! Children, beginners, adults who enjoy fairy stories, collectors, and those who like Mary Hanson-Roberts' artwork would all enjoy this deck immensely and learn alot from it. For myself, after using this deck, I found that I could read better in general: the meanings of the cards took on a more imaginative form, and I could apply meanings from the cards to the querent's life very easily. As an introduction to the Tarot, or as a deck for the more advanced reader, this is an absolute treasure.

—Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot has a great richness to it because it is drawing on our knowledge of fairy tales as well as our knowledge of the Tarot. It works well for intuitive readings based on the images which can speak directly to us at a deep level. Although it may look like a children's deck it is suitable for anyone who is happy with an attractive, amusing deck which has more depth to it than appears at first glance. 


—Fairyhedgehog, Aeclectic Tarot


I have recommended this deck to everyone I know interested in Tarot and while at first they read reviews and see the deck and question me, once they USE the deck for the first time, they are hooked! As the author states in her introduction, the images are intended to appeal to our inner child, our earliest memories and our connections to fairy tales and their distinct sense of right and wrong, good and evil. These descriptions, again, seem simplistic and very black and white, and life deals us, like the Tarot, a mixed bag with gray areas, this deck comes through with clear messages and direction. Like our proverbial Knight in Shining Armor, the message in a spread heralds in with ease and in a manner that allow for deeper reflection as you view the images on the cards.

The artwork in this deck cannot be complimented enough. The images perfectly match the descriptions. Ms. Morrison, in her introduction, compliments Ms. Hanson-Roberts with seeing within her own mind and having an innate understanding of her ideas. This is true for this deck like no other I have encountered. There is a perfect congruity between image and word.

—Kate Robinson, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot approaches the reading of cards from a completely different aspect -- by associating with childhood images and fairy tales. This deck allows us to connect with our "inner child". Although the name may suggest this is a less than serious deck, this deck is a very valuable tool in discovering our inner selves and helping us reconnect with those simple things that give us joy.

The images on the cards do not obviously correspond with the imagery from our experiences with the Rider-Waite style of decks. Gone are the confusing "Quabalah mystery" symbolism that we pondered and studied in order to interpret the meanings of those older decks. This is the use of simple and obvious imagery that gives us instant insight into the meaning of the cards.

The images are drawn from well-known fairy tales and are familiar to just about anyone. The artwork of Mary Hanson-Robert is clean. She gives us very colorful images that attract attention but are not obtrusive. The artwork is not distracting, but is lovely to sit and reflect upon.

As we explore the deck, we find some familiar tarot references. We do have a Major Arcana comprised of 22 cards, all clearly marked with the number of the card in its order, and the name of the card. There is no mistaking the card's association. The Fool - 0 - is the scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz. If you look at the tarot as a personal journey of the one who begins as a fool, this association is very obvious. We have the symbolism of the yellow brick road, we have Toto and so much more. The Magician is Puss in Boots, the High Priestess is the Fairy Godmother. There are some very interesting associations, as with The Emperor being Father Christmas, the Old Woman in the Shoe for the Empress, Judgment using The Cricket from Pinnochio, Glinda for The World, "Goldilocks being discovered" as Justice. The images are so obvious in some instances, yet they challenge you to use your own judgment and personal insights.

I also find myself drawing on my own knowledge of the tarot and associations when I am using this deck. While someone who is not familiar with the traditional meanings of the tarot will find this a very easy and fun deck to use, those of us who are trained in the traditional meanings will not find this "foreign" as there are familiar associations here. When we look at the "Two of Cups", the traditional meaning being a lesser "Lovers" card, it's association is still retained with the story of the "Owl and the Kitty Cat", so we are not totally out of familiar grounds. Pentacles still retains its meaning of material matters while cups still reflects inner emotions. The "Ten of Swords", a card of chaos and mistakes, shows the story of Humpty Dumpty falling off the wall. The traditional meanings are not told in the mysterious symbolism but in very obvious and well thought through imagery.

The small details on the cards not only attract attention but allow special reflection and a good look at one's inner self. And these special touches make this a remarkable deck. I love this deck for personal contemplation. I have also used this deck for clients who wanted to examine their own personal feelings and issues and it has provided much insight. It works as well with clients as it does with personal readings.

I would also like to suggest that if you have a youngster who is interested in tarot cards and readings, that this would make a perfect first deck. As our children watch us using the cards, they will also want to explore the path with you, as all children look to their parents for guidance. This deck is so perfect for the younger apprentice that I couldn't think of any deck more perfect for the "almost teenager" or the "First Deck" gifting. If you are looking for something that is perfect for a holiday gift, or someone just starting, or the "first deck" give this deck a viewing and see if you don't agree this could be the deck for you.

—Margaret Foster, Amazon customer

$21.95
Chrysalis Tarot
Chrysalis Tarot

What customers are saying about Chrysalis Tarot

I love, love, love the Chrysalis Tarot. I feel the whole idea is so suitable to the metamorphosis of human development. The cards are attractive and easy to understand. The cards are unique and for the people I have read for - the new take on the cards allows for intuition to actively participate.

—Nadine B. Roberts, Tarot Professional


Every now and again a product comes along that brings such a fresh take on somewhat stale concepts, it becomes clear early on that product is destined for lots of awards, sales and satisfied consumers. The Chrysalis Tarot is absolutely one such product.

The artwork by Holly Sierra is not like anything else on the market. Her paintings are a mixture of folk, tribal, Celtic, Medieval and New Age. Yet everything about this tarot deck works in perfect harmony. It's like world peace in a box. Each of the 78 cards in this deck is mesmerizing. The colors, the creativity in the meaningful imagery and the attention paid to detail is simply a cut above.

It's time to talk about the Chrysalis Tarot meanings penned by Toney Brooks. These tarot meanings are crafted in such a way to deliver deep symbolism served up in an understandable and entertaining manner. Each card denotes its Rider-Waite twin soul and somehow he has discovered a way to pack a ton of sage wisdom into words that energize as they're read.

The Chrysalis Tarot is a deck all appreciators of tarot art and tarot meanings should own. For tarot readers who resonate with its imagery, this deck is sure to bring a whole new level of channeling to your readings.

Kudos to Holly Sierra and Toney Brooks! Congratulations to their publisher, U.S. Games Systems, Inc. for a shrewd acquisition made.

—Bernadette Carter King, New Age Examiner


The artwork is beautiful. That much is obvious. But there is more to this deck than a pretty face. Chrysalis is full of symbolism without being busy. It bears characters from different cultures, and when you look at the characters, there is a strong sense that they each have so many lessons to teach you. The culture mix is one that works, and that is because in life there is no one "correct" way to gain wisdom. You can gain wisdom from any kind of person, even from a small child. The author (Toney Brooks) and artist (Holly Sierra) understood that when creating Chrysalis tarot. There are lessons to be learned in good times and bad, in your elders, family, neighbors, and even in folk tales if you know how to find them. Chrysalis guides you to healing, empowerment, and peace with yourself and the world around you.

If you have ever thought of meditating with a card, or doing pathwork, this is an excellent deck to do that with. In fact, I find some of the cards grabbing me by the hand and pulling me in so that the cards can share their story with me. It is a very chatty deck.

I love that each suit has a color theme, representing each element. The change from cups, wands, swords, and pentacles to mirrors, spirals, scrolls, and stones are appropriate and drive the point home. My favorite is the change from frustrating court cards in other decks to troupe cards that are around to guide the querent on their journey. And let me not forget to say, there is no Emperor and Empress than Chrysalis' Green Man and Gaia.

If you want a deck to help you on your own Hero's Journey, Chrysalis is the way to go. It is not just any deck, but one focused on healing, wisdom and enlightenment.

—Jane Halliwell, Amazon customer


I was, naturally, intrigued by the image on the box as shown for this item. I checked out US Games to look at a few of the other cards (Usually the tarot publishers have at least a few more cards you can see to get a feel for a deck.) I admit I love tarot cards as much for their artwork and creativity as for actual use in divination!

These cards are beautiful! Even the back image is stunning! I also like that the deck is kind of Rider-Waite, yet not. However, although they use different names for the cards, they also indicate what the RW card is called (Card III of the Major Arcana is named "Gaia" but just underneath it is labeled "III. The Empress"). Images are clear and really, just beautifully illustrated. The card stock is a nice weight and the coating is neither too slippery or too clingy. They will naturally be rather stiff at first--I found it a little difficult to shuffle them.

The actual suites are named Stones, Mirrors, Spirals and Scrolls. And, as you would expect, stones = pentacles or coins, mirrors = cups, spirals = wands and scrolls = swords. I also like the mix of cultures: you'll see Celtic style knots as well as East Indian style decoration, among others, and Herne the Hunter is the Emperor but Ma'at is pictured on the Justice card with Papa Legba as Strength and Kali as The Tower. The pictures on this deck also abound with all kinds of wildlife: ravens, bears, dragonflies, dragons, winged horses, etc.

I have many, many decks because I love collecting them but I only use a couple for divination. I may consider adding this deck to the ones I actually use, it is such a joy to look upon.

—Cat “Rampant Reader”, Amazon customer


Many readers spend their lives collecting decks, enjoying many philosophies while examining and implementing various artistic interpretations. I have my fair share of cards and can admit I have hoped that in this lifetime I would find "The One." This would be a dream deck, of course, wherein it unquestionably represents who I am (not just as a tarot lover, but as a complex and delicate being who walks this good Earth). I can say with all goodness and honesty, Chrysalis Tarot is, in fact, "The One." The most glorious part in sharing that information is this deck can very easily be "The One" for EVERYONE.

The sacred place from which these players and meanings derive is referred to by the author, Toney Brooks, as "The Otherworld." In this place of dreams you will find majestic and domestic creatures, from dragons and lions to cats and lambs. There are historical figures, both mystical and real. There is Celtic ritual woven and blended with Eastern god and ancient Egyptian goddess energy. You will seek wisdom from The Crone and The Maiden, A Celtic Owl as The Hanged Man. You will feel the innocence of the deer, powerfully running with the spark of creativity in the Eight of Spirals. You will hear the coo of the swans in the Two of Mirrors.

This actually brings me to make a point that while the names of suits used in "traditional" tarot have been changed, there should be no trouble at all with understanding and interpreting for yourself or for clients. The guidebook is invaluable and concise. Never have I read a LWB and felt as though I completed a metaphysics course. The information is to the point, yet deeply moving and literary. I particularly loved the introduction of the suits and what they represent before each individual card meaning. My goodness, these cards are beautiful.

How many times have we explained to each other, as tarot enthusiasts, "I purchased that particular deck for such-and-such card"? We do this. We buy decks for merely one card, alone. I put myself out there, entirely, by saying every single card in this deck is "that" card. Holly Sierra has channeled heavenly poetic and woozily dreamy love into these images, making her and Toney Brooks a celebrated spiritual force, in my opinion. One of my favorite things about the deck artwork is the different borders around each court card. I LOVE that. It's subtle and clever. And while I go on and on about the beauty of the deck, with its rich colors and soft, summer essence, I can say this is perfect for masculine energy, as well.

As for the functionality of the cards, they are shuffled with ease, without bending and/or scraping. They are not too glossy, not flimsy at all. The deck arrived in a small, sturdy box, which I think is still worth saving. I pre-ordered this deck a few months ago and it arrived very quickly and two to three weeks before the actual estimated time of arrival.

One last thing I will emphasize about this deck is once I held it in my bare hands I could feel the healing energy radiating through my alignment. This is truly going to help people. I believe this. I am thankful to have found this deck. I am grateful to have found "The One." I know I will use this to the end of my days.

—Silver Palimpsest, Amazon customer


One of the problems with the Tarot in general is that its imagery has become rather stale. Each "tradition" has its own set of pre-cast imagery, and even though some are incredibly beautiful and innovative, still, one is left with the feeling that, "Oh no, another one." When I get a new deck, I am always hoping for something indeed new, but the demand of the marketplace all too often take priority over innovation, and we wind up with a parade of clones.

Enter the Chrysalis. Here is the fresh breeze of inspiration that many have been waiting for. The best word I can use to describe the Chrysalis is "Mythic". The images are very fairy-tale like, but rather than calling to mind the standard set of familiar stories, these cards encourage you to generate your own fairy tale, to tell your own story, and become your own myth.

While the structure of the deck is similar to the "traditional" tarot, the imagery is very much a new ballgame. They are bright, colorful, and in most cases more suggestive than explicit in meaning. In many cases the images seem familiar, and yet are a very different take on the underlying theme. Consider XV, "The Devil" in a traditional deck, but here, "Bella Rosa," a masked lady parading through a carnival. The mask provides a certain anonymity, an isolation between the world and the inner person. Each one of these cards will make you think about new ways of looking at old meanings.

And that is a major breakthrough. A Tarot card has two meanings, an objective and a subjective. The objective meaning, or "denotation", is bound up in a set of keywords, relationships within an esoteric system, and body of knowledge that points to a pre-determined, a priori definition of what the card means. On the other hand, there is the subjective meaning or "connotation", a personal reaction to the card that often draws on unconscious sources that embellish the images with a personal significance. The chief problem in learning to read the Tarot, at least in learning to read it as an oracle, is getting beyond the denotation, into the subjective connotation, which is where the actual divination takes place. In a deck such as this, where the imagery is quite different from the body of traditional, one is forced to rely on the subjective. You will have to look into your own soul to understand what these cards mean, and what they will mean to you is different from what they will mean to anybody else. Subjectivity is individuating -- having to find things out for yourself breaks you off from the herd. And as this deck breaks itself off from the "traditions" -- even, thankfully, the ones I often rely on -- to read it you will need to discover something of yourself that has remained hidden behind the mask.

Which brings us to the book. I generally don't like tarot books, but this one is different. Instead of repeating the usual prattle, this one is short, to the point, and serves its purpose of launching your journey, rather than hand-holding you through it. I come from a very different background than the author, and would take issue with much of what is here, but the point is that the issues are raised, and how you follow them through the cards is your own prerogative. The book, in this case, is a helpful tool rather than a hindrance.

I could go on about this deck forever, and that is probably the best thing I can say about it. Its mandala-like imagery beckons one to go on forever. For here is a tool for the exploration of the conscious and the unconscious; for as long as consciousness exists, that exploration will go on, and indeed consciousness can only continue to exist where that exploration is possible.

—Bruce Albert, aka Doctordruid


I have been waiting on Chrysalis's release for quite some time and once it was in my hands it did NOT disappoint! It was worth the wait!

I cannot say enough positive things about this deck. Not only is the artwork gorgeous, the LWB is actually quite detailed for the size and Toney Brooks did a fantastic job with his re-envisioning of the tarot framework. The names assigned to not only the Major Arcana, but the court cards as well (now known as the Chrysalis Troupe) are absolutely spot on. What a breath of fresh air to the realm of tarot this deck is!

It's a very accurate deck, and as another reviewer said, very "chatty". I thoroughly enjoy working with it. In fact, I don't even want to put it down.

The artwork on the back of the cards is a feast for the eyes in and of itself. Holly really did an indescribably incredible job with this deck.

You won't be disappointed!

—Midnight Gypsy

$21.95
Pocket Symbolon
Pocket Symbolon

What customers are saying about Symbolon:

The Symbolon deck is a pictorial representation of the twelve astrological archetypes and their relationships, all depicted as persons. Their content is based on hundreds of therapeutic sessions with patients and draws from fairy tales, mythology, religion and common archetypes.

You should consider the symbolon deck as a blueprint of the author's complete therapeutic knowledge.

It can be used to clarify astrological constellations, but the authors developed a set of twelve spreads to be used seperately from astrology. Ingrid Zinnel even defined meanings for them as "card of the day", with self-empowering statements.

The artist did an outstanding job. No other deck has these amount of breathtaking images.

—Patricia Swinkels, Amazon customer


I love this strange, weird and exquisite deck. I have over a 100 Tarot and Oracles and this is the most unusual one I have come across. The artwork is some of the most stunning out there. such little details done with precision and vibrancy. I can only hope the artist one day decides on doing a Tarot deck. The colors are amazing, this is high-quality printing. There are 78 cards and they are are 3x5 and very easy to shuffle and handle. It's a very substantial and top-notch production in every aspect.

It also has many more uses than the creators very limited ideas of how to use these cards. This is one of the few decks that shows the whole spectrum...from very very dark/frightening to blissfully happy....and everything in between. So many of the images come from myths, folktales and fairytales....it's bursting with archetypes. Many cards are so reminiscent of Tarot images (minors and majors). But it's not a Tarot at all and it's uses run the gamut from inner shadow work, persona/mask identification, relationship issues, storytelling, divination, self-growth, inspiration, creative writing prompts, spiritual pathworking/exploration and self-actualization. As you can see this deck's range is broad and many layered. The sky is the limit as to how this deck may be used. The images evoke some very strong reactions and can set your exploration and imagination off in many directions. You will find this is a deck you reach for again and again.

If just for the exquisite and sublime art in these cards this deck is worth owning, but it delivers so much more. Get it yourself and awaken the muse within.

—Rashchupkina, Amazon customer


This is a 78-card deck that is difficult to categorize. It is definitely not Tarot. It is also not a divination system. Perhaps the designer's explanation describes it best:

"Symbolon is a game of remembrance. It allows us to remember things hidden deep inside which have been prevented from surfacing over years and decades.

For those who prefer a psychological approach, you might say the power inherent in the images helps raise the unconscious into the higher levels of consciousness."

The deck is based heavily on Astrology, but you can use this deck with or without the Astrological information. In my opinion, an understanding of astrology will make this deck much more enjoyable to use. Each card has either two or four astrological symbols. Those with two have a planet and a zodiac sign, those with four have two of each and are used as combinations. For example, someone with Moon in Capricorn would indicate this combination with the card that shows a combination of Moon (Cancer) and Capricorn (Saturn), which equates to "The Ice Queen." Other aspects from the horoscope are represented in the same manner. Obviously some familiarity with your chart will allow you to lay out cards to represent each aspect, giving you a symbolic representation of the chart.

The art in this deck is excellent. The scenes are detailed and the colors are gorgeous. The astrological glyphs are in metallic gold ink as is the border on each card. I can only hope that the artists will one day decide to do a traditional Tarot deck. There is a card for each sign of the zodiac, which shows the sign and the planet. Two cards are given for the planets, which do double duty: Venus (Taurus and Libra), and Mercury (Gemini and Virgo). The authors give an explanation for this departure from the norm, which they know will upset many astrologers. Although astrology plays a large role in this deck, the authors emphasize that the cards represent "inner personae", not just astrological aspects. To quote again: "Each of us has a 'MEDIATOR' - a Gemini-Mercury - responsible for communication and contact (and for acting out roles)." This allows for using cards that are not indicated on your chart and makes allowances for those who do not have any previous knowledge of astrology. The cards which represent the twelve signs of the zodiac loosely correspond to the Major Arcana in a Tarot deck in that they "..describe the individual personae as a pure archetype." The remaining combination cards represent "..the great realms of human existence which may combine at any time to form inner personae..." The scenes on the cards are quite evocative and cover a gamut from vampires to religious imagery. Some of the scenes are very similar to cards from the Tarot.

The little booklet that comes with the deck describes two methods for use, one for those who know astrology and one for those who do not. A list of planet/sign correspondences is given for those who need it. The booklet states that there are three ways of interpreting a card - as "the problem," as "the way through the problem" or as "the outcome." The interpretations for each card are divided into these three categories. A "Theme Summary," which is basically a short list of key words, is also given for each card. Finally, black and white photos of each card are shown with the corresponding page for their interpretation. This is useful for those who are unfamiliar with the astrological glyphs, as it allows them a means to determine which card is which. Numbering the cards would have been simpler in my opinion and, in fact I recommend that those not familiar with astrology number the cards and the interpretations in the book anyway. It will save a lot of time in the long run. Those familiar with astrology will find that the interpretations are laid out in a logical sequence starting with the twelve zodiac cards, followed by the Moon and Sun cards, followed by the cards for the signs in order. I recommend this deck for anyone familiar with astrology who likes working with cards. The art is stunning and makes this deck a pleasure to work with. Astrologers tend to have their own interpretations for aspects and the scenes on these cards will not be in agreement with everyone's interpretations, but I think the scenes that one doesn't agree with may give food for thought, or shed new light on an aspect or sign.

—Michele Jackson, Tarotpassages.com

$23.95
Fin de Siècle Kipper
Fin de Siècle Kipper
What customers are saying about Fin de Siécle Kipper
 
From the wonderful Victorian images to the silvery card edges...I’m over the moon for this deck! I’m also loving the fold over box lid that closes magnetically.  U.S. Games and Ciro Marchetti have executed a wonderful product that I recommend to anyone who has an interest in learning “Kipper” card reading.  I love that Ciro has updated the imagery in a way that keeps the integrity of the original cards yet gives us something fresh and new.  
 
In the guidebook you will find quite a bit of information-and I like this. In the past we’ve seen many LWB’s that give us very generic information about card meanings.  This book is truly a guidebook that you will want to read.  Ciro covers the story about how this deck came into being as well as information from three different experts that will help you learn the card meanings:  Fortune Buchholtz, Stella Waldvogel and Susanne Zitzi
—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine

This deck is just one surprise after another is my first observation to share with you and they are all good surprises might I add. First is the package the deck comes in; a magnetic close box, ahhhhh! You have to be a real card person to understand why I say ahhhhh, it’s the simple things in life right? And continuing on the materials side of production, the card stock is nice and thick and the silver gilt edging is very nice as well. Nice presentation US Games, Inc.
 
Mr. Marchetti did his typical amazing job at designing these cards, artwork extraordinaire. He took the cards from what was their home in Bavaria during the Biedermeier period and moved them to London, and he made the move quite smoothly. While the older style decks have a charm I love, this deck exudes his chosen area and era without being over the top. Many of the cards share elements from one or another card(s) in the deck giving you a sense of continuity that a card reader will appreciate for its flow of energy as well as artistic appeal. Ciro did an amazing job of capturing the energy of each card and updating them to scenes that we of the 21st century can quickly analyze. The older decks don’t translate as quickly to us in this day and age as this deck does and he has remained true to the cards as individuals and as a whole, in my opinion.
 
Like magick the deck animates and gives you core meaning information right on your phone or tablet. Watching some and listening to others gave me a chuckle or two and I will say that quickly the meanings stick in your head via this method. It’s a free app (the LWB tells you all about it) and it is well worth the time downloading it to use as a learning tool.
 
And last but not least is the Little White Book (LWB) that comes with the deck. As most of you know already, there is little to nothing written in the English language to help you learn Kipper. This LWB does so in dare I say grand style. Not one or two but three different and respected Kipper readers offer their viewpoint on each card. Stella Waldvogel, Fortune Buchholtz and Susanne Zitzi share their combined and rather formidable knowledge of the cards in a very brief but very clear and concise manner. For those of you looking for more written knowledge of Kipper this could well be what you need until someone releases a book on the subject. I will also say, I took a lot of notes into my personal Kipper journal from this LWB and that is something I rarely do from any LWB no matter how rare the find of info.
I did take the deck for a test run if you will. As I said I was learning Kipper and I had a Kipper 101 Exam from the World Lenormand Association who offered this class, by the way don’t let the name fool you they know Kipper as well. The deck shuffles well and I could quickly and clearly read both what the cards were as well as the energy they represent. So to sum it up I say this, grab this deck because this Kipper is a Keeper!
 
—Hugh Irving, Spellbound of Nyack

It is the end of the 19th century that lends its Victorian clothing styles, architecture, and the early inventions of the Industrial Revolution to the images depicted in the Fin de Siecle Kipper created by renown Tarot artist, Ciro Marchetti. Images are lovely and the black background of the cards really helps the colors to “pop,” for greater visual impact. The finish is a high gloss that gives the images of the Fin de Siecle Kipper a lovely sheen. The cards glide smoothly against one another in shuffling and laying out spreads. I really enjoy the feel of this deck. Silver gilding, a compact box with magnetic closure, a guidebook written by several experts in the field of Kipper card reading make for a wonderful & very useful product from USGS.

—Dr. Nefer Khepri, Magickal-Musings.com

$21.95
Barbara Walker Tarot in a Tin
Barbara Walker Tarot in a Tin

What customers are saying about Barbara Walker Tarot:

The Major and Minor Arcana are fully illustrated with rich, colorful designs that were hand painted by Barbara Walker. They are finely detailed and realistic. Some of the figures are partially or completely unclothed. For those who are sensitive to this, there is nothing lewd or gratuitous about these depictions. The suits are Cups, Wands (which are actual wands, not tree branches), Pentacles (which are actual pentacles, not discs or coins) and Swords. Each card is named and the Major Arcana is also numbered. The meaning of each Minor Arcana card is distilled into one key word that is printed above the picture, while its individual designation is printed below.

Barbara Walker's interpretations are rooted in Tantric philosophy; and the pictures illustrate religious ideas from India, through the Middle East and into Europe, as she believes the Tarot cards themselves evolved. There are no images representing African (other than Egyptian), East Asian, Pan-Pacific or Native American cultures. Ms. Walker does not incorporate orthodox Christian beliefs. She explains in her book how the church co-opted many pagan traditions into its dogma (intentionally or otherwise) and some cards may seem to illustrate these beliefs.

Anyone familiar with the Rider-Waite or Marseille Tarot will recognize the symbolism easily, although there are a few exceptions and some subtle changes. Instead of a disembodied hand holding the symbol for the Aces, a full-fledged representation of the Goddess is clearly illustrated. Ms. Walker maintains that the Major Arcana are symbols of initiation into the mysteries of the pre-Christian religions, where the Triple Goddess reigned supreme and reincarnation was accepted. To that end, she removes the more obvious interpretations based on patriarchal bias and restores the original matrifocal intent. The most obvious departure from other decks is the depiction of the court cards. They are Kings, Queens, Princes and Princesses, and they are each given the specific name and image of a God or Goddess that represent the characteristics of that card. The King and Queen and the Prince and Princess are paired according to specific mythologies. For example, the King and Queen of Swords are Indias Yama [godlike authority, powerful judge, discipline and order] and Kali [fatal decisions, swift action, deprivation or widowhood], the Prince and Princess of Cups are Britains Galahad [gallantry, courtesy, capacity for self-sacrifice] and Elaine [mystical insight, hidden knowledge, poetic inspiration]. This is a great help to me in interpreting the court cards, which can be very similar in their traditional representations.

— E. Y. Ivanova, Aeclectic Tarot


The Barbara Walker Tarot belongs to another era and this is probably why it fascinates me and goes unmentioned by others. It is the kind of deck that I like to read with using one card draws; shuffle and think of one aspect of an issue, cut and read the uppermost card. Then ask another question, shuffle, cut, read. I enjoy having conversations like this with a deck.  There are no ambivalent cards in this deck; all the Minor Arcana seem either forceful or diminishing in influence and are quite easy to read as a result (for me anyway) despite the unfamiliar mythological archetypes. The world is full of decks that want to make us feel good about ourselves decks that want to delude us, distract us with their prettiness, give us the answers we secretly think we want. Not this one. The Barbara Walker Tarot is uncompromising in its strangeness. Asking it for answers can feel at first like tapping the hardened, barren, cruel earth for answers. There is something heartless and savage about it on first impressions, but looking at it now makes me reflect on the path tarot has taken over the last 25 years; it has lost some of its weirdness and now tries to manufacture it again with the trend for dark decks, though we need look no further than the Barbara Walker Tarot; they don’t come much darker than this.

—My Curious Cabinet

$18.95