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Renaissance Tarot Book
Renaissance Tarot Book

What customers are saying about A Renaissance Tarot Book

A "companion book" + an indispensible tarot history resource

This book was published to accompany the author's "Renaissance Tarot" deck. But whereas most companion books confine themselves to the deck they are sold with, perhaps folding in generic tarot-reading instructions, this book explores the origins and symbolism of the tarot with such depth that it is an important stand-alone tarot book.

Moving beyond recycled speculation about gypsies, Egyptian mystery cults, and other such exotica, this book goes directly to the source: the culture of Renaissance Italy, which produced the first tarot decks. Williams does not attempt to deliver the definitive "truth" about what the original tarot designers may have had in mind, but he does collect an extraordinary array of "tarot parallels" in art, literature, philosophy, mythology, and folk culture. What emerges is a picture of the enduring archetypal nature of the each of the tarot symbols. Williams shows how deeply embedded these images are in our culture, and how ubiquitous and familiar they were to people in 15th century Europe.

The text is supported by hundreds of attractive line drawings, made by the author to illustrate the historic works of art referenced in the text. The book thus becomes a guided tour back in time to the culture that produced the first tarot decks, imbued with the author's personal vision and yet faithful to the facts at every turn. There are few books available to give the student a trustworthy and useable account of the meaning of the tarot symbols in their original context. This is one of the best. Also included are brief descriptions of the cards in the Renaissance Tarot deck, along with divinatory meanings and some instruction on reading the cards. The book's greatest value, however, is in illustrating where the tarot comes from, and deepening and enriching the reader's understanding of the ancient symbols. Even if you don't use the Renaissance Tarot deck, this book will give you many wonderful insights about the tarot and bring you into a deeper relationship with the cards of your own deck. Highly recommended.

—Tom Waters, Amazon customer


The journey that is the Renaissance Tarot spanned a period of ten years - the results show the care, thought and nurturing that was taken every step of the way. Brian Williams had a life long interest in both classical and Renaissance art, which he has translated nicely into the Renaissance Tarot. After spending a year in studies at the University of Padua in Italy. Brian took the illustrations and theory that would become the Renaissance Tarot and used them as the basis for an independent thesis and project at the University of California at Berkeley.

One of the themes that run through this book and deck is the place that Tarot held in European culture. Brian's stated purpose with the accompanying book is to provide a complete guide to the cards, their meanings and their uses. He also goes into the historical significance of each of the cards, which is not something that I have seen done elsewhere. Each card, including the minors, has a bit of myth in it that explains the archetypal qualities of the card, For example, the Ten of Swords is the myth of Paris and Achilles, while the Chariot is the myth of Aphrodite and Ares.

Throughout the accompanying book there are a wealth of black and white illustrations from the Renaissance period. At one point we see the game of Tarot being played (as taken from a mid-fifteenth century fresco in the Sala dei Giochi in the Casa Borromeo in Milan. At another point we see a manuscript illumination of Mars (the God) from the fifteenth century. At yet another point we see an engraving of a Satyr family by Durer from 1505. The list is endless - and fascinating.

With each of the majors we are treated to a wonderful description of the card, quite an involved background into the archetypal myth, and incredible illustrations, as well as divinatory and reversed meanings. With the court cards and the minors we see a description of the card, an abbreviated version of the myth behind it, as well as divinatory and reversed meanings. Each section contains a black and white scan of the card.

At the end of the book Brian presents a section on Tarot spreads, including the Celtic Cross, Tetrasky (also known as the Pythagorean Tetrad) and the Twelve Houses spreads. An interesting aside on the Twelve Houses spread is that it is presented in a square format (referred to as a quadrilateral design), rather than the usual circular format.

The cards themselves are 2 3/4" by 5", on glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/4" white border, with a bisque colored center containing intricate work using triple circles resembling Celtic Knots, upon which reside the medieval symbols for the elements in the four corners, with four corresponding animals floating within them. A male and female figure recline in the center, with their hands held. The almost blandness of the backs acts as a kind of foil for the wonderfully rich colors of the card faces. Again we see the use of a 1/4" white border, followed by a 1/4" gold inner border. The top two corners of each of the cards contain figures (some animal, some human, some symbols) that are there for ornamental purposes only. The title for each card is across the bottom, in both Italian and English.

The overall coloring is a well-done pastel, with the figures dressed, for the most part, in Renaissance fashion. The pips make basic use of the suit symbol, with animal and human figures added to them that are not integral to the understanding of the cards. Each suit has its own color: yellow for Swords, pink for Cups, green for Pentacles and blue for Staves.

There are two small changes in the titling of the Major Arcana: the Wheel of Fortune becomes Chance and Judgment becomes the Angel. Each time I return to this deck I find something new to intrigue me. The accompanying book has lessons of its own to give. I highly recommend this deck to all students at all levels of study.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$17.95
Cosmic Tarot
Cosmic Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT COSMIC TAROT:

I've tried many decks before picking up my first set of these cards. I use them so often I'm purchasing my third deck! I had a lot of trouble understanding the meaning behind the tarot cards until I picked up Cosmic Tarot. Everything suddenly became clear. The pictures are nice to look at and not confusing. They symbolism is clear and helpful. The court cards make more sense than any other deck out there. I highly recommend this deck for anyone.

-- Sadie, on Amazon


The artwork on these cards is quite extraordinary. It is certainly one of those instances where the on-line scans do not do justice to the artwork. The title card explains that Norbert Losche is a self-taught artist. I believe the technique used to create the cards was to use pen and ink. The illustrations are rich in detail and symbolism. The figure drawing is faultless and the use of color is quite spectacular. In the suit of wands the dominant colors seem to be pink and yellow, while in the cups suit there is a dominance of blue and green. The other suits and the trumps are more varied.

It seems with this deck his intention was to create a deck based soundly on the Golden Dawn system. In some ways it is like a fully illustrated version of the Golden Dawn's 'Book T', with the exception of the Court cards. The Major Arcana would appear to be fairly much in line with the symbolism used by Waite in his own deck with only a few exceptions. The Hierophant appears quite differently and more like a mystic than a Pope. He holds a card in one hand and looks to his right and we see a ray of light in his line of vision. The Hermit is a younger man sitting in a yogic posture with eyes closed. His lamp is beside him on the ground and a star above radiates light. The Wheel of Fortune is another elaborate design showing a huge wheel in the night sky. The planets are arranged in such a way as to fit onto the Qabalistic tree of life. A ring showing the zodiacal glyphs surrounds the six ancient planets surrounding the Sun in the centre. The artwork on the majors, like on all cards, is intricate and full of detail.

The Court cards seem to illustrate stars of the silver screen era. While there are a few I can pick, many are unfamiliar to me. Almost all are blessed with incredibly good looks. All figures are shown in a portrait style with the upper body only. Again they are intricately detailed. The cards are linked to different astrological signs but in a different way to the normal Golden Dawn attributions. The creators’ attributions are quite unique I believe. He links the four Cardinal signs to the Kings, the mutable signs to the Queens and the Fixed signs to the Princes. Most of the figures have a symbol of the associated sign on or near them. For example, the King of Cups has a crab pinned to his lapel to represent Cancer. In the background of the Queen of Wands we can see an archer at the top of a tower, representing Sagittarius.

The Minor Arcana are fully illustrated but quite different in many instances from the Waite-Smith minors. I have heard them described as more like the Thoth meanings. Personally, I believe that Norbert Losche has attempted to provide illustrations based on the Golden Dawn meanings from 'Book T', which is where the Thoth and most of the Waite-Smith meanings also come from. In many of the minor cards we can also see zodiacal or planetary glyphs or symbols which link the astrological associations made by the Golden Dawn. While at first someone familiar with the Waite-Smith system may find these cards quite different, anyone who was familiar with the underlying Golden Dawn meanings could quite easily make sense of them.

The Six of Cups shows a couple sharing a quiet moment together. There is the sense of intimacy as well. This fits with the Golden Dawn title of 'Pleasure'. The Four of swords shows four men sitting down and sharing a drink. There is a camel tethered in the background. Four swords are laid out on a blanket in front of them on which is the glyph for Jupiter. The Golden Dawn title for this card is 'Rest from Strife'. On the Thoth deck Crowley titles is 'Truce'.

Of course, for those readers who read more intuitively, these images provide a perfect visual and symbolic landscape as the colors are rich and the images are very detailed. I would recommend this deck for beginners as well as more experienced readers, and certainly for collectors. The deck provides a solid framework with its basis in the Golden Dawn system and also has plenty of scope for intuitive interpretation. The artwork is, in my opinion, almost unequalled in modern tarot decks. Having now been in print for almost 25 years is a testament to both its substance and beauty.

-- Sapienza, Aeclectic Tarot


The Cosmic Tarot is a deck you'll want to consider as an everyday reader. Overall, the images are evocative, but still retain the balance needed for productive readings. Nudity is at a minimum, and is tastefully portrayed. The images themselves are pen and ink, with pastel colors dominating the palette. The court cards consist of portrait drawings of persons who bear remarkable likeness to Hollywood stars. However, they are not so similar as to be distracting. The pip cards are detailed enough to allow for intuitive readings based upon the image alone.

My favorite card is probably the High Priestess. Her deep penetrating gaze peers over the waters, and stands amidst a smaller drawing of two lovers, a crescent moon, and the book of alpha and omega. The card back is probably one of the best designs I have ever seen. A star field contains an elaborate pentagram, with a rising sun and moon. At the center lies a white rose. The artist, Norbert Losche, is self taught, which is remarkable, given the aesthetic quality of the drawings.

-- Gary Higgins, Aeclectic Tarot


Hands down my favorite Tarot deck. The images are rich with symbolism that anyone can understand, and that's important when you're a novice reader.

The cards do have a 1930s or 1940s Hollywood feel to them; the images are supposed to portray specific actors and actresses from that era, but I personally don't notice these resemblances when I'm doing a reading. I think the artist just happened to hit on the right face for each of the various cards. What is noticeable is how the blue, black, and white colors and the shading effects used in the art seem to deepen and enhance certain symbolic elements of each card.

-- Breezy0413, on Amazon

$26.95
Dragon Tarot
Dragon Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DRAGON TAROT:

When I first became interested in reading the tarot, the one thing that I had a problem with was finding a deck that suited my feelings and represented ME. Then one day I stumbled upon the Dragon deck, and I felt like my prayers had been answered! The artwork and symbolism, combined with the rich history, myth, and mystique that surrounds dragons in general, turned out to be just what the doctor ordered. The use of many rich colors was something that I felt, at that point in time, many other decks didn't seem to have (although now I know otherwise). But, my absolute favorite part about this deck are the Major Arcana. They were (and still are) like nothing I had ever seen before. The capture all the symbolism of traditional tarot decks, but they also contain a draconic twist that is sometimes a bit funny (in particular, the Hanging Dragon card!).

All in all, the Dragon Tarot was the first deck I ever owned, and it remains my favorite to this day. I highly suggest this deck to anyone who doesn't feel connected to the more traditional decks, and longs for something deeper. It is very hard to put into words all that I feel with this deck, so you may be better off experiencing its power for yourself, but believe me, you won't regret it! Again, I have seen many decks in my days, but none of them compares to the power and imagery of the Dragon Tarot!

-- Charlie Taylor, on Aeclectic Tarot


I absolutely LOVE this deck. The images are beautiful and powerful and readings are very accurate for me. A friend of mine did one reading with my cards and has decided he wants a deck of his own. It is a very strong deck, but "welcoming," almost like coming home. If you like dragons, you will most likely connect with this deck and may keep it as your personal deck.

-- Kelli Riffle, on Amazon


Gorgeous artwork! This is the kind of deck that speaks to anyone with a love for dragons and dragon lore. I fell in love with it when it first came out, and I haven't used another Tarot deck since.

-- Nathalie Wigmore, on Amazon


I just received this deck and already love it! The dragons are most elegant, intelligent, powerful but not *terrifying*! The combination of dragons and Tarot symbolism may not always be clear for Tarot beginners, but Tarot folks who have a little imagination and love dragons will delight in this deck, and they will come to understand and value its unique messages. I did not care for the Celtic Dragon deck, think it's a bit sappy. By contrast, Pracownik's work has sophistication and edge, and the dragons are just simply gorgeous.

-- Eva A. on Amazon


The Dragon Tarot follows the now traditional path of a 78 card deck.

Each card is individually illustrated with dragons and adheres loosely to the Rider Waite deck for its' imagery.

So what's it like to use the Dragon Tarot? I love it!!!! Colorful, charming, quirky but full of dragon fun and humor. Both the reader and querent will enjoy the use of this deck. The dragon appeals to all with the mystery and beauty. I feel the Dragon Tarot takes us back to a more innocent time. A time perhaps of legend, when man and dragon shared this world. You decide when you take up the challenge of the Dragon Tarot.

-- Kelvin Black, on Tarot Canada

$21.95
Gummy Bear Tarot Deck
Gummy Bear Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT GUMMY BEAR TAROT

This is indeed my favorite deck and I will keep using it over and over again. It is cute and adorable and perfect for smaller hands. I wasn't sure if I would even resonate with such a deck, but decks can surprise you. If you want younger people to get into card reading, this is a perfect deck. 

It is set up in the Rider Waite style, which I love. I learned on the original Rider Waite deck growing up. This deck totally doesn't have an evil vibe in the entire deck. I smile every time I see it. I want to thank U.S. Games for having the courage to put out a deck like this. I really do LOVE it! A definite must buy! Get it now!

—Toni Walker, Divine You Blogspot


"Gummy Bears are a tradition enjoyed by generations. Who better to turn to for inspiration or a new outlook on life?" This quote from the 59-page companion booklet from the Gummy Bear Tarot from U.S. Games by Dietmar Bittrich says it all, do not dismiss this deck as juvenile, as I did for a long time before examining it closer!

The art style most certainly is simplistic, although it does closely follow Rider-Waite in a very pared-down way. However, this serves to make it very easy for the intuitive Tarot reader from beginner to advanced to just blossom with psychic inspiration. I feel the clarity of the cards, the 'crayola'-like colors, and the happy images help the alpha waves flow. The fronts of the cards have a minimal white border, and the Major Arcana are labeled with the Title and also with the number (Fool=0). Some of my favorite Major cards are the Devil and Death, and the Hierophant (who appears female to me). The Minors are labeled also, and two of my favorites are the 5 of Pentacles, with two forsaken Gummies outside the church (one lame), and the ominous black-caped Gummy of the 5 of Cups. The backs of the cards have 16 bears, 4 rows of 4, red, blue, green, and white. It is impossible to tell from the back if you have drawn a reversed card.

When reading with this deck, I found it very easy and a pleasure to use. It is definitely querent friendly. The booklet recommends using the Celtic Spread, or one- to three-card readings. As far as meanings of the cards, the meanings in the booklet assigned to the cards are slightly different and much more positive than Rider Waite, and there are no "reversal" meanings per se, only "strengths" and "weaknesses. One thing I loved about the booklet is that for every card, despite strength or weakness, it has an assigned "Task" per card, such as for 5 of Cups the Task is "Renewal". This is a very easy concept for anyone, your querent, or yourself if meditating with the deck to grasp.

A definite plus is that it comes in a cute little tin for card safekeeping. I would highly recommend this deck to both new and advanced readers. New readers can easily learn from the numbering of the cards, and the simplicity of the meanings in the booklets, especially the "tasks"; and advanced readers, especially Gummy lovers or Rider-Waite or Hansen-Roberts readers will be refreshed by the art and get many laughs. That alone is worth the price of the deck!

—Debra Madigan, Aeclectic Tarot


This is my new favorite deck, and I own about a dozen. I look forward to my daily reading and find these cards are easy to connect with and very accurate and easy to read. They are elemental and whimsical at the same time. A very wonderful deck for beginners, old timers and a great teaching tool for kids. They are a sweet and tasty treat I enjoy every day. Try some ..a healthy and enlightening snack.

Feona Willow, Amazon customer


Ah, ya gotta love the Gummy Bear Tarot. I don't like eating gummy bears, but as tarot characters, they are simply irresistible! First of all, it's one of the decks US Games has packaged in a tin, which is such a brilliant idea. And like the other tarot-in-a-tin decks (Vanessa and Halloween), the deck is pocket sized and printed on matte card stock. So right out of the gate, it's got three things going for it. And we haven't even gotten to the reading of the cards yet.

The Gummy Bear Tarot follows the traditional RWS imagery so it is ready to read right out of the box. The vibrant colors and G-rated illustrations make it ideal for children or those less comfortable with the "scarier" images in traditional tarot. It's also a great deck for when you want truthful readings, but you want them presented in a more light-hearted manner. For example, I had a particularly difficult week, and I wanted to use a deck that would lift my spirits, while not necessarily sugar coating the readings. This was the perfect choice, and it did just that.

You would think that with such a silly premise, this feel-good deck wouldn't be able to provide serious readings. You would be mistaken. This deck speaks in a very easy manner, and is very straightforward in its messages. I can see it easily being used for everyday reading.

The LWB is great too. It is deck-specific and provides interesting insights into the cards. What I love about it is that they don't give the usual upright and reversed meanings. Instead, they provide "strengths" and "weaknesses" for each card, so if you don't read reversals you can still get a full, balanced sense of each card. Also, each strength and weakness is accompanied by a wise (and often humorous) saying and a task.

I think the Gummy Bear Tarot is a great all-purpose deck. It has surprised me by sneaking into my list of favorite reading decks. It's kid-friendly, it's adult-friendly, what more could you want?

—Kiki, Tarot Dame Blogspot

$18.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Tarot of the Spirit Deck
Tarot of the Spirit Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF THE SPIRIT DECK

$21.95
African Tarot
African Tarot

What customers are saying about African Tarot 

 
This could very well be the single cutest tarot deck in existence.
The title "African Tarot" is probably quite offputting to many people: are the art and descriptions specifically meant for Black people? Not at all. I am a black woman in Washington state and have showed this deck to countless white friends who have found it adorable. Its booklet displays meanings that seem pretty much standard to Rider-Waite system. Indeed, I've seen this deck defined as a "Rider-Waite clone".
 
The suits are also traditional: Wands, Swords, Cups and Pentacles. However, in the artwork the Swords are depicted as spears, the Cups as gourds and the Pentacles as golden discs. It is a very colorful (mainly primary colors, even), happy little deck, even though the people rarely give more than a vague Mona Lisa-type smile, if that. They have dark skin and dredlocks, but that's about where any cultural departure ends.
 
The artwork, however, was the clincher for me. There are a lot of "whimsical" decks out there with "childlike" art, but so help me, the art on the African Tarot is something I'd be *proud* to display on my 'fridge. It's childlike, but also of good quality and seems very secure in itself, a rarity in many homegrown "whimsical" decks.
The cards are approximately 3" x 2.5" and covered with what I assume is a standard, slick coating. This makes them easy to shuffle, but I have a habit of dropping some cards if I'm just going through them while holding them in my hands. The design on the back is as charming as each individual card design -- two spotted tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see either of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers the tortoise a symbol of "the slow coming of justice". Appropriate, no?
 
The deck comes in a brown, corregated cardboard container, which, after a few years of ownership, still seems quite sturdy. Both sides of the box are decorated with the same cardstock as the deck, with hints of the art style and relevant information printed on them. It gives the box a very environmental feel that goes with the deck very well.
The authors have subtitled the deck "Journey Into the Self." It is meant to be a lighter deck, and a loved deck. For me, it is. Very much loved, in fact. However, don't let the "lighter" aspect fool you. One of the spookiest tarot experiences I've ever had, involving a lost -- and later recovered -- card and some odd correspondences, happened involving this deck. It's not a *fluff* tarot. I would consider it more of a powerful specialty deck.
 
—Ashe Monday, Aeclectic Tarot 

I have previously used the Rider-Waite deck and found it to be rather "stuffy" for my tastes. I purchased the African Tarot deck at the recommendation of others and love it. I have already used it several times - it has wonderful pictures and I get a great feel from the images and explanations on the cards. You will not be disappointed!
 
—“Book Fiend”, Amazon Customer

This has got to be the cutest deck ever! It is a Rider-Waite variation and has been created mainly for beginners. Colorful, light-hearted and whimsical, this deck is really small (2.5 - 3 inches) and looks like it has been drawn by children. There is no real traditional African art on these cards, but there is the flair of an African village in all scenes, and the faces of the people are black. If you like light-hearted and fun decks, this will probably become a favorite for you.
 
Katerina, U.K. Amazon customer

A lot of people may be put off by the idea of an "African Tarot Deck," thinking that it must involve voodoo, arcane tribal symbolism, or just be for black people. Well, I'm a black woman who has shown this deck to white friends -- this deck is completely accessible.
 
The "African Tarot: Journey into the Self" is a teeny little deck based on Rider-Waite symbology. It also looks like it was drawn by a child with talent -- the sort of art that you'd *want* to put on your fridge. The people are brown and have kinky hair, and they live in an African village -- after that, and a few liberties with the suit cards -- it's a standard deck.
 
The suits, by the way, are traditionally named. However, the art shows Swords as spears, Cups as gourds and Pentacles as coins or disks. The art is rich and perhaps a tad dark for some, perhaps it's best not to read this one in low light -- but then, it's far from a gothic deck. The back design is equally darling -- two colorful tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see one of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers this animal a symbol of "the slow coming of justice" -- appropraite enough considering its country of origin.
 
I even find the package a total keeper: a brown, corrugated cardboard box with descriptive cards glued to the back and front. A rubberband to keep the box closed and you could probably drop this deck into your backpack and only have the box take damage. However, the box is so cute, why would you want to?
 
The little booklet inside confirms the image that this is a feel-good deck -- many of the interpretations are positive or at least encouraging of growth. So, while this isn't an all-occasion deck, I certainly think it's worth a look!
 
—R. Byrd, Amazon custome
$18.95
Goddess on the Go
Goddess on the Go

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT GODDESS ON THE GO:

"Goddess On the Go is a small deck of 33 uplifting and stunning paintings of women on the go combined with a heart-centered nourishing phrase. Designed especially for the fast paced life style of today's goddesses (all women are goddesses), it is small enough to fit anywhere and light enough to be carried around everywhere." -- Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Goddess on the Go is the third oracle pack from Amy Sophia Marashinsky, creator of the Goddess Oracle and the more recent Oracle of the Grail Code: Restoration of the Feminine. For this deck, she has worked with artist Melissa Harris to create an accessible, positive and nurturing affirmation deck that is "a dose of spiritual first aid" -- successfully, I should add.

Amy's affirmations are designed to be concentrated energy phrases, simple but elegant, and capable of "dissolving core negative thoughts and replacing them with a healing beam of transformational light and love". After choosing Melissa as the artist, Amy went through Melissa's huge collection of paintings to find the right images to match them. She paid close attention to the energies of the words and what they created with their vibrations, and knew the text and its accompanying image were right when she "held the card while reading the affirmation and felt it entering my being like a burst of light, leaving a fallout of happiness and peace".

Melissa's images have swirling, saturated colours blurring into almost watery edges. They're more expressionistic than realistic; the figures inspired by the women in her life but mostly from her imagination, and have a strong feeling of motion and dance. My favourite card has the affirmation, 'I am filled with Divine Energy', painted with a woman dressed in yellow and purple, her head thrown back in a wild and joyous dance.

Physically, the cards are small -- roughly playing card size -- and compact enough to fit in a handbag or purse. A few of the cards are landscape oriented instead of portrait (of which I'm not a great fan) but as the cards generally used individually rather than in readings, it isn't a major problem. They're packaged in a small but sturdy cardboard box (the top lifts off -- it's not a flip-top box), with a 70-page little white booklet.

The booklet is a personal look at the background and process of the deck's creation, the effectiveness of affirmations, and the possible uses for the deck (as it's not a deck for readings as such). Amy offers some suggestions:

  • Nurturing (breathing deeply, then engaging with the image and letting its message sink in until you feel nourished);
  • First aid (for use in a moment of stress or anxiety -- just escape to the bathroom with your cards, ground yourself, and then go through the entire deck of cards, one at a time, until you feel more centred);
  • Affirming the life you want (finding the four cards that can assist you);
  • Affirmantra (using the affirmation like a mantra in meditation).
  • There are fairly similar decks on the market with a goddess, female-centric or affirmations theme, but I liked the Goddess on the Go pack because of its simplicity and the way its art and advice can instantly bring about a mental or emotional change. These are uplifting, positive cards, perfect as the pick-me-up in hard times or as a gentle daily reminder. I really enjoyed working with this deck, and it's one I'll be continuing to use.

    -- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot

    $14.95
    Magical Times Empowerment Cards
    Magical Times Empowerment Cards

     

    What people are saying about Magical Times Empowerment Cards

    I’ve been waiting eagerly for this amazing deck to come out since I heard that U.S. Games was going to publish it! I followed Jody’s artwork of the Magical Times that started trickling down on Facebook, one card at a time…but Oh, what a gorgeous set of cards!

    It seemed to take FOREVER before I got the word that I was going to be able to review it and wow…As I sat opening this deck, my eyeballs just about popped out of my head…this deck was beyond what I had hoped for!  Magical Times Empowerment will absolutely knock your socks off with Jody Bergsma’s exquisite imagery, powerful positive affirmations and a sturdy yet stunning hard flip top box.

    Some of you may recognize Jody’s other deck, The Spirit of the Wheel Meditation deck, which in itself is a fantastic set of cards.  Jody began her journey with art at an early age and with her mother’s encouragement. She was invited to her first art show at fifteen and has dozens of awards which incorporate her unique style of imagery containing fantasy, wildlife, and geometric designs that can be seen in several of the Magical Times cards.

    Jody’s use of affirmations…  affirmations are sayings that can be used to manifest your needs and bring positive and permanent change to your life…in each card gently allow the reader to align their energy and can be read in two ways…1.) Direct cards, straightforward meanings that provide an insight or call to action and 2.) Reversed cards, which can indicate a potential blockage or imbalance in your energy that needs some attention.

    This card deck contains 44 graceful, and interactive portraits, that cause the reader to pause and reflect on their journey by asking “What does this mean…?”  ”What information is this particular card trying to impart to me…?” Both wonderful questions that once asked and reflected upon, can be written down in a journal to keep observations and insights in. The affirmations are written in a flowing script style, giving it a unique feel, with some words highlighted in bold. 

    There is a awesome LWB (Little White Book) that is not really little but contains affirmations a bit more in length than what is simply written on each card so the reader can fully grasp it’s meaning and possible message.

    This has got to be the most awesome deck this year, I love the muted shades of soft summer colors, hints of green, lavender and earthy gold hues. It all adds up to make this an amazing, most definitely a must have deck, as with all US Games decks! The cardstock is perfection and I love the larger than average size along with the reversible backs with their bright and cheery circles.

    All in all, this is an absolutely wonderful deck that I heartily encourage everyone to go look at! It’s a “Must Have” for any person, go look, you’ll see!

    —Liz Christie, Tarot by Elizabeth blog


    There is a lot to love about this deck, with its pleasing colors, evocative art, and empowering messages. I like the way certain words in each inspirational message are emphasized by printing them in the calligraphy-style font used for the card's title/keyword. The keywords chosen by Jody Bergsma appear to cover every possible aspect of life, tuning in to common human emotions, perceptions, desires, and needs.

    I'm looking forward to trying the spreads from the Little White Book, especially the Five-Card Elemental Influences Spread, which is designed to answer the questions "Who are my allies?" and "Who walks beside and within me?"

    The watercolor paintings are truly lovely and inspirational. The animals and people are realistic yet have a fantasy feel. On one of my favorite cards, Pilgrimage, a white-haired, bearded man (who reminds me of "Father Christmas" or perhaps Merlin) appears to be moving forward, accompanied by several white animals including a wolf, bear, fox, deer, owl, and hawk. Another favorite of mine is Humor, which depicts a young fairy girl in a rainbow-striped dress dancing with a winged cat. A white dove flies overhead, spreading rainbow colors across the sky.

    Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes blog


    I just received a copy of the “Magical Times” empowerment cards, by Jody Bergsma, and I am blown away! I loved t his deck from the moment that I opened the b ox and took the cards out.  There was an instant connection. Upon reading her bio, I understand why. Bergsma lives in Bellingham, WA – the same state that I live in!

    “Magical Times” is a 44 card set of cards combining inspirational images (based on Bergsma’s love of native wildlife, fantasy creatures, and geometric design) and affirmations. The 28 page companion book is presented largely in text, with five black and white images. The intent of the companion book … and the deck … comes out in the first sentence under “To Begin Your Readings” : “Like all things, Magical Times Empowerment Cards” are a living energy, and it is good to align with their life force.” We are immediately transported into a magical world that offers us hope and caring. Each card is presented with an affirmation. We are advised that the more times we read our affirmation, the deeper it will go into our mind and the more influence it will have.

    I find this deck to be very easy to connect with, and to use. I did a trial run with the cards in my May Full Moon ritual … they worked very well! The word empowerment is not used loosely – this IS an empowering deck!

    —Bonnie Cehovet


    Magical Times Empowerment Cards by Jody Bergsma is a deck of forty-four cards, each with a pretty image and short affirmation. An enclosed twenty-eight page book includes a further message for each card as well as three spreads for use with the deck.

    I am enough of a hard-core tarotist to not be a huge fan of oracle decks in general, but I recognize their purpose. An oracle deck requires no study, and no prior knowledge of the cards. You can purchase the deck and be doing readings the same day. Oracle decks such as Magical Times Empowerment Cards require only the desire to receive inspiration and perspective.

    One of my favorite things about Magical Times is its lovely box. There will be no need to find another box or pouch for these cards. The cards themselves are a bit larger and squarer than most tarot decks. The cards are colorful without being garish. Each card has a simply title, such as Confidence, Creation, Nature, Prosperity and Quest. I really like the forty-four words that were chosen to be cards in this oracle. Right away I can see how these words could be helpful in healing, inspiring and directing those who seek wisdom from the cards.

    Each card is illustrated with a lovely picture. The images feature faeries, angels, animals—both real and mythical, flowers, butterflies and Celtic symbols. The Dignity card, for example, features a dragon. Destiny features dolphins. The Dance card shows a faerie dancing with a winged frog. I love that there is a Dance card, as well as a card of Mercy, and one of Manifestation. In many ways this is obviously a high-quality oracle. The art is appealing, and the cardstock is sturdy.

    I appreciate how much information is in the booklet. The cards are listed alphabetically. Each card has a statement that begins with “Today I will.”  This is in contrast to the affirmations that are printed on the cards, which are directives rather than first-person affirmations.

    I really like the spreads in the booklet. There is a simple one-card spread, a three-card spread and a five-card spread complete with an elemental ritual. All three spreads seem effective and helpful. The variety of the spreads could easily inspire a diviner to create their own spreads for use with the Magical Times Empowerment Cards.

    I recommend the Magical Times Empowerment Cards to anyone who enjoys pretty oracle decks, mystical images and simple, spiritual messages.

    Christiana Gaudet, Christiana’s Tarot Topics blog


    Welcome to the Magical Times Empowerment  a magical deck of  affirmations and dream-like fantasy images in rainbows of color. It becomes an instant friend.

    This deck is truly inspired. Some images have a playful energy and others are truly sacred in nature. The deck resonated with me immediately, in much the same way as a much-needed affirmation sets a situation straight with positive clarity. I was surprised by the ability of this deck to hone in gently on a situation while offering guidance (sample reading is at the end of this review). I found myself very excited and in wonder as I walked through this beautiful deck, discovering the gentle images of fantasy.

    Magical Times Empowerment  are quality cards that sweep us into a wonderful journey that bridges our outside world experience with our inner emotional self. It is a gentle deck, easy to read, rich in color and imagery, and requires no reading experience in order to jump in and begin the intuitive experience. Angels, birds, faeries, unicorns and dragons are just some of the spirits that flow through the deck images. This elegantly boxed deck would make a beautiful gift to a dear friend, including a gift to yourself. I found myself immersed in its flowing energy right away and found it connected with my life situations immediately. I highly recommend this deck.

     —Tarot by Donnaleigh blog

     

     

    $17.95
    The Spirit of Herbs
    The Spirit of Herbs

    What customers are saying about The Spirit of Herbs:

    This book is wonderful, and I don't say that lightly. As an herbalist I found it helpful on many levels. With each card there is a corresponding herb and description that deals with the physical and spiritual health aspects of the card. There are ways to use the herbs as talismans or how to make them for consumption. My clients and I have always found the readings relevant and "right on".

    —K.P. Wolf, Amazon customer


    Great book for anyone interested in the Tarot and Herbal medicine. Michael Tierra covers not only the tarot card, with its beautiful imagery, but he also gives you in-depth info on the herb represented by that card. It is difficult to get this book, so if you can find it, grab it.

    —P. Pitchford, Amazon customer


    I have been using this book and the deck that goes with it for several years. It is a good reference companion to the deck and I always gain new insights into the cards and the plants each time I return to the book.

    — Michelle, on Goodreads

    $9.95
    Pocket Symbolon
    Pocket Symbolon

    What customers are saying about Symbolon:

    The Symbolon deck is a pictorial representation of the twelve astrological archetypes and their relationships, all depicted as persons. Their content is based on hundreds of therapeutic sessions with patients and draws from fairy tales, mythology, religion and common archetypes.

    You should consider the symbolon deck as a blueprint of the author's complete therapeutic knowledge.

    It can be used to clarify astrological constellations, but the authors developed a set of twelve spreads to be used seperately from astrology. Ingrid Zinnel even defined meanings for them as "card of the day", with self-empowering statements.

    The artist did an outstanding job. No other deck has these amount of breathtaking images.

    —Patricia Swinkels, Amazon customer


    I love this strange, weird and exquisite deck. I have over a 100 Tarot and Oracles and this is the most unusual one I have come across. The artwork is some of the most stunning out there. such little details done with precision and vibrancy. I can only hope the artist one day decides on doing a Tarot deck. The colors are amazing, this is high-quality printing. There are 78 cards and they are are 3x5 and very easy to shuffle and handle. It's a very substantial and top-notch production in every aspect.

    It also has many more uses than the creators very limited ideas of how to use these cards. This is one of the few decks that shows the whole spectrum...from very very dark/frightening to blissfully happy....and everything in between. So many of the images come from myths, folktales and fairytales....it's bursting with archetypes. Many cards are so reminiscent of Tarot images (minors and majors). But it's not a Tarot at all and it's uses run the gamut from inner shadow work, persona/mask identification, relationship issues, storytelling, divination, self-growth, inspiration, creative writing prompts, spiritual pathworking/exploration and self-actualization. As you can see this deck's range is broad and many layered. The sky is the limit as to how this deck may be used. The images evoke some very strong reactions and can set your exploration and imagination off in many directions. You will find this is a deck you reach for again and again.

    If just for the exquisite and sublime art in these cards this deck is worth owning, but it delivers so much more. Get it yourself and awaken the muse within.

    —Rashchupkina, Amazon customer


    This is a 78-card deck that is difficult to categorize. It is definitely not Tarot. It is also not a divination system. Perhaps the designer's explanation describes it best:

    "Symbolon is a game of remembrance. It allows us to remember things hidden deep inside which have been prevented from surfacing over years and decades.

    For those who prefer a psychological approach, you might say the power inherent in the images helps raise the unconscious into the higher levels of consciousness."

    The deck is based heavily on Astrology, but you can use this deck with or without the Astrological information. In my opinion, an understanding of astrology will make this deck much more enjoyable to use. Each card has either two or four astrological symbols. Those with two have a planet and a zodiac sign, those with four have two of each and are used as combinations. For example, someone with Moon in Capricorn would indicate this combination with the card that shows a combination of Moon (Cancer) and Capricorn (Saturn), which equates to "The Ice Queen." Other aspects from the horoscope are represented in the same manner. Obviously some familiarity with your chart will allow you to lay out cards to represent each aspect, giving you a symbolic representation of the chart.

    The art in this deck is excellent. The scenes are detailed and the colors are gorgeous. The astrological glyphs are in metallic gold ink as is the border on each card. I can only hope that the artists will one day decide to do a traditional Tarot deck. There is a card for each sign of the zodiac, which shows the sign and the planet. Two cards are given for the planets, which do double duty: Venus (Taurus and Libra), and Mercury (Gemini and Virgo). The authors give an explanation for this departure from the norm, which they know will upset many astrologers. Although astrology plays a large role in this deck, the authors emphasize that the cards represent "inner personae", not just astrological aspects. To quote again: "Each of us has a 'MEDIATOR' - a Gemini-Mercury - responsible for communication and contact (and for acting out roles)." This allows for using cards that are not indicated on your chart and makes allowances for those who do not have any previous knowledge of astrology. The cards which represent the twelve signs of the zodiac loosely correspond to the Major Arcana in a Tarot deck in that they "..describe the individual personae as a pure archetype." The remaining combination cards represent "..the great realms of human existence which may combine at any time to form inner personae..." The scenes on the cards are quite evocative and cover a gamut from vampires to religious imagery. Some of the scenes are very similar to cards from the Tarot.

    The little booklet that comes with the deck describes two methods for use, one for those who know astrology and one for those who do not. A list of planet/sign correspondences is given for those who need it. The booklet states that there are three ways of interpreting a card - as "the problem," as "the way through the problem" or as "the outcome." The interpretations for each card are divided into these three categories. A "Theme Summary," which is basically a short list of key words, is also given for each card. Finally, black and white photos of each card are shown with the corresponding page for their interpretation. This is useful for those who are unfamiliar with the astrological glyphs, as it allows them a means to determine which card is which. Numbering the cards would have been simpler in my opinion and, in fact I recommend that those not familiar with astrology number the cards and the interpretations in the book anyway. It will save a lot of time in the long run. Those familiar with astrology will find that the interpretations are laid out in a logical sequence starting with the twelve zodiac cards, followed by the Moon and Sun cards, followed by the cards for the signs in order. I recommend this deck for anyone familiar with astrology who likes working with cards. The art is stunning and makes this deck a pleasure to work with. Astrologers tend to have their own interpretations for aspects and the scenes on these cards will not be in agreement with everyone's interpretations, but I think the scenes that one doesn't agree with may give food for thought, or shed new light on an aspect or sign.

    —Michele Jackson, Tarotpassages.com

    $23.95
    The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin
    The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin

    WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE WONDERLAND TAROT

    The collaborative team of Christopher and Morgana Abbey beautifully adapted the style and flavor of Sir John Tenniel's illustrations of Lewis Carroll's work to fit the typical Rider-Waite-Smith (RWS) system. The Major and Minor Arcanas are fully illustrated, facilitating the work of a reader who is familiar with the RWS symbolism. Of course, the replacement of the suits occasionally gives the reader pause (The Swords, Staves, Cups, and Pentacles are now Flamingos, Peppermills, Hats, and Oysters, respectively), but once the reader accommodates to that alteration, this deck is found to be quite easy to work with. The color and style of these cards provide a somewhat Victorianesque feel that may be quite appealing to many readers. One of the considerable benefits of this deck, however, is that the cards themselves are the approximate size of a standard playing deck. Readers who permit the querant to shuffle the cards may appreciate this, as many non-readers (indeed, as well as some readers!) have a difficult time shuffling the slightly larger sized cards that are characteristic of most Tarot decks. Individuals with more mundane plans for this deck are additionally fortunate in that the playing-card equivalent of the Minor Arcana is notated in the borders of each of the appropriate cards (e.g., the “Five of Spades” is noted in the border of the Five of Flamingos). Although best suited for someone who already possesses a bit of Tarot acumen, the little white book (LWB) included with the deck should be particularly helpful to those not already acquainted with Alice and her adventures. Each card is well described in terms of its depiction of characters and suggested divinatory meanings. In sum, the Wonderland Tarot is a surprisingly pleasant deck that provides a whimsical atmosphere, familiar symbolism, and convenience in handling. This is a marvelous combination for any Tarot deck.
    —Tom LeBlanc, Aeclectic Tarot


    One of the most noticeable things about this deck is that the traditional suits have been changed: swords = flamingos; rods = peppermills; cups = hats; and pentacles = oysters. The suits are also marked with the corresponding symbols from ordinary playing decks: hearts, diamonds, spades, and clubs. The artwork is based on that in Lewis Carroll's Wonderland books. All of the characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass appear, including the Walrus and the Carpenter, the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, Bill the Lizard, the Mock Turtle, and the Cheshire Cat. Lewis Carroll appears as the Magician. Of course Alice appears repeatedly throughout the deck.



    The illustrations are well done and capture the spirit of the books, with story elements well matched to cards' meanings. The deck feels good to hold, in part because they are close to the size of a standard playing deck. Also, the cards are of sturdy high quality, and have a strong, positive metaphysical feeling. 
This is a very unique and original deck. I would suggest it to anyone who collects tarot or is a Wonderland fan.
    —Amazon customer

    $18.95