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Albano-WaiteŽ Tarot Deck
Albano-WaiteŽ Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT ALBANO-WAITEŽ TAROT:

The Albano Waite deck almost screams "late 1960's acid trip." I have thought of the deck as the Rider Waite Smith on acid. This deck is probably not for everyone. It is definitely a product of the late 1960's. I like this deck because of the crazy colors and because I like anything from the 1960s and 1970s. To me the Albano Waite Tarot deck is very unique, has a fun feel to it, and is an improvement on the regular Rider Waite Tarot deck.

-- Erin Parnell, on Aeclectic Tarot


The Albano-Waite Tarot is based on the line drawings of the Rider-Waite, but the colors are rich and vibrant. There are no tints and shadings, just bright expanses of color in many cases. The background colors on the Minor Arcana cards are particularly striking. They include such unusual choices as purple, orange and yellow. Where the Universal Waite is soft and muted, the Albano-Waite is bold and exciting.

-- LearnTarot.com

$21.95
Renaissance Tarot Book
Renaissance Tarot Book

What customers are saying about A Renaissance Tarot Book

A "companion book" + an indispensible tarot history resource

This book was published to accompany the author's "Renaissance Tarot" deck. But whereas most companion books confine themselves to the deck they are sold with, perhaps folding in generic tarot-reading instructions, this book explores the origins and symbolism of the tarot with such depth that it is an important stand-alone tarot book.

Moving beyond recycled speculation about gypsies, Egyptian mystery cults, and other such exotica, this book goes directly to the source: the culture of Renaissance Italy, which produced the first tarot decks. Williams does not attempt to deliver the definitive "truth" about what the original tarot designers may have had in mind, but he does collect an extraordinary array of "tarot parallels" in art, literature, philosophy, mythology, and folk culture. What emerges is a picture of the enduring archetypal nature of the each of the tarot symbols. Williams shows how deeply embedded these images are in our culture, and how ubiquitous and familiar they were to people in 15th century Europe.

The text is supported by hundreds of attractive line drawings, made by the author to illustrate the historic works of art referenced in the text. The book thus becomes a guided tour back in time to the culture that produced the first tarot decks, imbued with the author's personal vision and yet faithful to the facts at every turn. There are few books available to give the student a trustworthy and useable account of the meaning of the tarot symbols in their original context. This is one of the best. Also included are brief descriptions of the cards in the Renaissance Tarot deck, along with divinatory meanings and some instruction on reading the cards. The book's greatest value, however, is in illustrating where the tarot comes from, and deepening and enriching the reader's understanding of the ancient symbols. Even if you don't use the Renaissance Tarot deck, this book will give you many wonderful insights about the tarot and bring you into a deeper relationship with the cards of your own deck. Highly recommended.

—Tom Waters, Amazon customer


The journey that is the Renaissance Tarot spanned a period of ten years - the results show the care, thought and nurturing that was taken every step of the way. Brian Williams had a life long interest in both classical and Renaissance art, which he has translated nicely into the Renaissance Tarot. After spending a year in studies at the University of Padua in Italy. Brian took the illustrations and theory that would become the Renaissance Tarot and used them as the basis for an independent thesis and project at the University of California at Berkeley.

One of the themes that run through this book and deck is the place that Tarot held in European culture. Brian's stated purpose with the accompanying book is to provide a complete guide to the cards, their meanings and their uses. He also goes into the historical significance of each of the cards, which is not something that I have seen done elsewhere. Each card, including the minors, has a bit of myth in it that explains the archetypal qualities of the card, For example, the Ten of Swords is the myth of Paris and Achilles, while the Chariot is the myth of Aphrodite and Ares.

Throughout the accompanying book there are a wealth of black and white illustrations from the Renaissance period. At one point we see the game of Tarot being played (as taken from a mid-fifteenth century fresco in the Sala dei Giochi in the Casa Borromeo in Milan. At another point we see a manuscript illumination of Mars (the God) from the fifteenth century. At yet another point we see an engraving of a Satyr family by Durer from 1505. The list is endless - and fascinating.

With each of the majors we are treated to a wonderful description of the card, quite an involved background into the archetypal myth, and incredible illustrations, as well as divinatory and reversed meanings. With the court cards and the minors we see a description of the card, an abbreviated version of the myth behind it, as well as divinatory and reversed meanings. Each section contains a black and white scan of the card.

At the end of the book Brian presents a section on Tarot spreads, including the Celtic Cross, Tetrasky (also known as the Pythagorean Tetrad) and the Twelve Houses spreads. An interesting aside on the Twelve Houses spread is that it is presented in a square format (referred to as a quadrilateral design), rather than the usual circular format.

The cards themselves are 2 3/4" by 5", on glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/4" white border, with a bisque colored center containing intricate work using triple circles resembling Celtic Knots, upon which reside the medieval symbols for the elements in the four corners, with four corresponding animals floating within them. A male and female figure recline in the center, with their hands held. The almost blandness of the backs acts as a kind of foil for the wonderfully rich colors of the card faces. Again we see the use of a 1/4" white border, followed by a 1/4" gold inner border. The top two corners of each of the cards contain figures (some animal, some human, some symbols) that are there for ornamental purposes only. The title for each card is across the bottom, in both Italian and English.

The overall coloring is a well-done pastel, with the figures dressed, for the most part, in Renaissance fashion. The pips make basic use of the suit symbol, with animal and human figures added to them that are not integral to the understanding of the cards. Each suit has its own color: yellow for Swords, pink for Cups, green for Pentacles and blue for Staves.

There are two small changes in the titling of the Major Arcana: the Wheel of Fortune becomes Chance and Judgment becomes the Angel. Each time I return to this deck I find something new to intrigue me. The accompanying book has lessons of its own to give. I highly recommend this deck to all students at all levels of study.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$17.95
Fantastical Creatures Tarot
Fantastical Creatures Tarot

What customers are saying about Fantastical Creatures Tarot

Enjoy Beth Henry's video review of Lisa Hunt's tarot decks

Another creation from a solid tarot team is the Fantastical Creatures Tarot. From the obvious power of the Winged Lion standing as the Sun to the delicate fairy who sit by the Ace of Cups, these cards are mesmerizing.

Hunt’s artwork has long been a favorite of mine. She has a way of imbuing her art with intricate images that demand your attention. She is well known in the Tarot world for good reason.

On the Fantastical Creatures Tarot website, Lisa (who holds a tabby who must have been the model for the Magician) says of painting this lovely watercolor deck:

“These beings are fixtures in our psyches, evoking a sense of wonder with the ability to serve as archetypal references for our own life journeys. The images flowed from my pencil and brush, responding to my own need to depict these magnificent, mysterious creatures that continue to captivate our senses and imagination.”

Physically this deck is standard US Games fare which is to say it is a sturdy deck that you won’t have to worry about falling apart at first shuffly. Two cards are quick reference cards–one for the Major Arcana and one for the Minor. This makes this a great gift deck for someone who wants to learn more about the Tarot who also has a love for all things mystical and magical.

There’s humor abounding in this deck as well. Hunt’s rendition of the Five of Swords had me laughing outloud. I didn’t know the creature but its turtle-like back, slightly cantankerous look set in a swamp captured a contentious 5 of Swords for me. When I consulted the LWB, I was greeted by the Kappa who is a Japanese creature.

Some of the meanings are not what I would call traditional but none of them went too far astray of the area of meaning. One major difference is in the Major most decks name Devil. Here instead we have Fenris Wolf on the card named Chains. Since Chains are a major element of the Devil, it was a good choice in my book. As one of Loki’s children, Fenris has many lessons about why you might be chained.

Circe is a favorite character of mine so I love this image of her surrounded by the animals she so loves. The colors are soft without being bland. While I would classify this an an art deck, it is also a deck to be studied and worked with. It will bring nuances to your knowledge of Tarot, as well as expand your mythological horizons. I highly recommend Fantastical Creatures Tarot.

—Arwen Lynch, Tarot by Arwen


The Fantastical Creatures Deck is one that pulls together in such a fresh, innovative, positive way, it both pleased and surprised me. I am a firm RW/UW reader, and I am generally leery of "dragony" decks. I first saw this deck on Aeclectic, and was intrigued enough to learn that the author was D. J. Conway (Celtic Dragon Tarot), with art by Lisa Hunt in her fantastic style. I went to U.S. Games (the manufacturer) to investigate more, and as a sign from the Goddess that I should have this deck, Lo and Behold, it was on sale for a very nice price! I clicked "Buy" immediately.

I can sum this terrific deck up in one word before going into depth about how informative and positive it is: WOW! The cards themselves are a fairly firm stock, they fit well in the hand, and the back is a lovely beige with an oriental filigree circle that prevents the reader or querent from knowing reversals ahead of time.

Nice extras include a glossy layout sheet with innovative tarot spreads: Changes is a 5-card layout to help deal with change and transformation, and there's also a 5-card layout for present life challenges. Two other very interesting ones are the Pyramid, which purports to show past, present, and future lives (or the past, present, and future in this life), and the Decision layout, consisting of 3 rows of three cards each, which show ultimately what could happen due to the actions we take on the cards (Isn't that what Tarot Reading is all about?).

Although I would classify this as a Rider-Waite style deck, this one is much less ominous. The creators have no reversed meanings, and for each card there is a "magickal use," which involves some type of meditation, or possibly a spell related to the meaning of the card, intended to heal the pain of the querent.

I have so many favorite cards in this deck! They are so well chosen, that some I had never heard of, and I learned quite a bit. Examining the Lower Arcana was a delightful job, and it's difficult to choose only a few to highlight. Gratefully, this deck taught me about the tenga of the Shintu oriental religion (Five of Wands), and also about the female Valkyries (Seven of Wands). I particularly love the Griffin as the Nine of Wands, which neutralizes any negative cards in the layout and enhances any positive ones.

I say "Bravo!" to this deck, and I recommend it to Rider-Waite fans who have been hungering for a little of the fantasy stuff.

— Debra Madigan, Aeclectic Tarot


”The Fantastical Creatures Tarot” was a Top Ten Deck for its year of publication (2007) – for good reason! This is a magickal deck – a portal into other worlds. The basis for this deck is the theme of mythical/fantasy beings, and the myth and lore surrounding them. The artwork is done in a gentle, very detailed fantasy style, using watercolors. There is a mystical, other-worldly feeling to this deck that just draws you in! Lisa’s art is so good, on so many levels – it is hard to know where to begin! One of my favorite things are the winged creatures (and human figures) – the High Priestess as a winged serpent, the Emperor as a winged horse, the winged lion on the Sun, the winged Centaurs on the Chariot, the winged female figure in the Star, the winged figure on the Four of Wands, the winged Queen of Wands, the winged Knight of Wands, the winged Nine of Wands, the winged Page of Pentacles, and the winged High Priest.

The detail in this deck is very well done – each time you study a card you see something new and different! I feel that this deck would appeal to those with a basic understanding of Tarot who wanted to work with a fantasy theme, those who are attracted to fantasy themes/artwork, or those who wanted a gentle alternative/comparative deck. This is a wonderful deck for ritual, meditation or journeying.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


Mystical beings, legendary creatures and mythic animals of all kinds come to life in the Fantastical Creatures Tarot, the fourth tarot deck from artist Lisa Hunt. The fantastical creatures are mostly drawn from cultural myth and legend, with some amalgamations for the purpose of the deck. All are painted in their natural environment (so to speak) in Lisa’s typically detailed, lifelike and beautiful watercolor style, in hues of muted earthy colors with highlights of deep blue. There are the obligatory dragons, winged horses, and unicorns, but also sphinxes, gnomes, mermaids, phoenixes, and minotaurs. Winged creatures feature frequently – winged cats, snakes, horses, humans, fairies,

Those who were drawn to Lisa Hunt’s previous decks will no doubt also enjoy the Fantastical Creatures Tarot. The lack of a full companion book may be a hindrance for some, but the set should suit the intermediate tarot reader who enjoys fantastical imagery and more intuitive readings. 


—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I took my time in getting to know this deck, although I was drawn to it immediately. As its title suggests, this is a deck of fantastical creatures. They come from around the world and throughout time, invoked from myth and folktale. Each has a lesson, or reason for being in this deck, and each in its own way will guide or inspire. What the title of the deck does not indicate is just how immersive these cards can be. This is not simply a "theme" deck - there is a complete world - or other-world - here, accessible to us, as inquiring travelers.

The Fantastical Creatures Tarot offers a connection to the energies of the many mythical beings found within it, and provides suggestions on "tapping into" these sources for their assistance in our lives. This very magickal element of the deck is important - it shows us something that is spiritually alive, so when we read with these cards we may (by our choice, and depending on our beliefs) be doing far more than understanding symbols, interpreting meanings, or engaging our intuition; we might be communicating with certain ancient powers.

Both the artist, Lisa Hunt, and the author, D.J. Conway, have done a terrific job in portraying these fantastical creatures. Hunt's artwork is detailed and accomplished, as well as warm, joyful, ethereal, and transformative. The images express an obvious love she has for her "subjects," and that feeling is rather infectious. The images are full of symbols - some standard for the tarot, some unique to this deck, which Conway comments on thoroughly in the little white booklet. Conway's treatment of the deck is instructional and insightful. She introduces us to each fantastical creature, offering a bit of its history and significance, describes the symbols on each card, and suggests divinatory meanings for when the cards turn up in readings. She also suggests magickal uses for each card, which might entail meditation on a card, or use in a spell or ritual. The little white booklet is quite comprehensive - much information is provided in its small pages. It is enjoyable simply to read about the great variety of mythical creatures in the deck.

The fully illustrated cards of the Minor Arcana exhibit equal creativity and insight, and uniqueness in imagery as well as interpretation. All of the cards come together to form a beautiful whole, and readings conducted with the deck feel touched with the spirit of these wondrous creatures. Included with the deck are two "quick reference guide" cards, and a very attractive, useful layout sheet that demonstrates five layouts and offers tips on conducting readings.

This is a truly lovely set that offers a spiritual presence as well as aesthetic beauty. It is highly accessible, with the versatility to go beyond everyday readings. I would strongly recommend the Fantastical Creatures Tarot.

—Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot


It may seem that the world of Tarot is entirely overrun with copycat decks and deck "creators" who barely know a thing about magick and mysticism. That is not the case with this deck. First of all, this deck is really original. The Fantastical Creatures are not ones you have heard of, at least not most of them. But that is only part of what makes this deck so exciting. The fact is that after more than a decade as a Tarot reader, a Witch, a Ceremonial Magician, and a student the Foundation for Shamanic Studies, I see in this deck that Conway grasps the underlying mystical, magickal sense of each card more fully and deeply than, really, almost anybody else out there who has produced a Tarot deck. I feel that the Fantastical Creatures Tarot is comparable in depth to the Haindl. And the artwork is just gorgeous; the scenes are enthralling, and the quality of the cards themselves is excellent, too. All in all, a great deck.

—Angelina H., Amazon customer


This is a wonderful, mystical deck. I almost did not buy it because other reviews warned "this is not a beginners deck" and that it did not line up with traditional decks. However the deck kept calling out to me so I purchased it. I am a beginner and I find this deck teaches me and leads me to greater understandings.

I would have to agree that this is not a "beginners deck" because it is the most slippery, tricky, insightful deck I have come across. It has a very definite personality. This deck, for me anyway, gives deeply incisive readings full of sassy and sometimes humorous insight.

If you enjoy a deck with personality and are not put off that it has a mind of it's own (very stubborn! - it keeps saying what it wants when it wants!) then this deck is wonderful. It will show you deeply (too deep for most people as it shows stuff you don't want to confront or admit even to yourself!). But beware - this deck is sassy!!!

The artwork is absolutely gorgeous. It does not try to follow tradition, but I find they speak wonderfully to my intuition. The only real break is with arcane 15 which is renamed "chains" but I personally like this change and find it consistent with the readings.

One final warning: those that want to keep their belief in the lie of the material universe walk away and do not purchase this deck. As Friedrich Nietzsche so eloquently says: "When you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into you."

$21.95
Halloween Tarot
Halloween Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HALLOWEEN TAROT:

I need to begin this review by saying that Halloween is a favorite holiday of mine. I like dark and creepy things. A tarot designed with Halloween images had to live up to an expectation of what I see in the holiday -- the fun and the serious, the comic and the dark; a combination of horror and delight; a mixing of old history and new customs. Plus, it needed to speak to me, through its art and words, and most importantly still, through the readings done with the cards. The artist and the author are both also great fans of Halloween, and they have indeed created a terrific tarot deck in honor of this black and orange holiday. The set exceeded my expectations of it, despite my quirky requirements.

All of the artwork is consistently very good, and the deck feels complete. After I read the book and studied the cards, I was ready to do some actual tarot work. Not to sound overly skeptical, but I wondered how the images would speak to me in readings, as they are designed around Halloween. Generally I don't do very in-depth readings when I first try out new decks. I give them a chance to sort of introduce themselves to me. But, for whatever reason, I felt moved to go into some detailed queries with these cards, and was surprised to see very accurate and somewhat uncanny results. The Halloween images did not get in the way of reading the cards in a traditional manner, in fact, they spoke to me as well as any other tarot.

The set obviously won't appeal to everyone. Not everyone likes Halloween, or will like the style of the artwork. Also, it's a dark deck -- in color, and features many skulls and spooky grinning faces. But, I do highly recommend the set to anyone who feels drawn to it, enjoys Halloween, or even just wants a very fun but useful deck for Halloween parties.

-- Nellie Levine, on Illumination Tarot


I love Hallows. I love the depth of magic that is woven as the veil thins and the serious, introspective work that is commonly undertaken at Samhain. I love the festivities of Halloween -- the costumes and candy and the prominent and often positive images of witches, black cats, cauldrons, and brooms. Not surprisingly then, I loved The Halloween Tarot, by Karin Lee and Kipling West. This deck is a Rider-Waite-Smith clone, in that the illustrations are closely based on the RWS deck, but the traditional images have been halloweenified. The Emperor and Empress become Frankenstein and the Bride of Frankenstein and the suits of pentacles, swords, wands, and cups are transformed into pumpkins, bats, imps, and ghosts respectively. The traditional aspects of the cards will appeal to readers who want to work with RWS, while the clever, colorful, fun, Halloweeny aspects will draw readers who dislike RWS or consider the images to be archaic, rigid, or flat. Unlike the RWS deck, every Halloween card includes a single black cat. This cat, whose image graces the reversible backs of the cards, begins the Major Arcana as the Fool's companion and ends up as the center of The World. The cat's presence unifies the deck, pulling together this diverse collection of Halloween lore, and the cat's animated facial expressions provide another layer to the cards' imagery.

It captures the fun of Halloween without the darkness or seriousness of Samhain. Even the Death card, often the most frightening image in a tarot deck, is portrayed as a smiling skeleton who is lovingly watering a patch of jack-o-lanterns. Karin Lee explains that "rather than portraying Death as mysterious and threatening, this card reminds us that death is part of the natural process of life. I highly recommend this deck and book set for what it is-a RWS deck with a twist and a fun portrayal of the secular side of Hallows.

-- Chava, on Matrifocus.com


This is a real Tarot deck with carefully thought out imagery based on the familiar Rider-Waite pack. It has been delightfully "twisted, turned, and tweaked" to create a colorful, humorous, and fun-filled Halloween deck. The brief little pamphlet that comes inside the box with the "deck only" set explains that the imagery chosen by artist Kipling West incorporates not only old-time Halloween archetypes but characters from old horror movies, circus images and from the German-made Vegetable People that were popular decorations in America in the 1920s and can be seen on vintage Halloween postcards. Mixed in with the Halloween symbols is a blend of ancient Greek, Egyptian, Hindu, Chaldean and biblical imagery. Kipling West knows her Tarot and she clearly loves Halloween as I do. This deck is so much fun, the illustrations so bright and colorful and detailed that I think most any Tarot lover will find it enjoyable. It is perfect for light-hearted, less serious readings that might be done at parties but can also be used by the serious student to broaden one's understanding of the traditional Tarot symbols. While the symbolism on the Court cards and the Major Arcana is very faithful to the Rider-Waite vision it is at the same time enormously creative in working the Halloween symbolism into the cards. The images are all fun and so they are useful for working with people that are merely curious because they do not frighten, however, an experienced reader can easily transpose their own deeper knowledge of the cards onto these loosely veiled images and the deck is satisfactory for serious divination. If you love the fun-filled and slightly freaky American holiday of Halloween with it's orange and black cornucopia of characters and symbols you will adore this deck as I do.

-- Terrie, on Amazon.com

$21.95
Medicine Cards Deck/Book Set
Medicine Cards Deck/Book Set

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MEDICINE CARDS:

Since the publication of the Navajo novel Seven Arrows, I haven't seen anything so adventurous or beautifully executed as Medicine Cards. This handsome and inviting package has much to teach us all.

-- Patricia Holt, San Francisco Chronicle


A potent yet refreshingly simple divination tool that can help us reconnect to the sources of life's natural guidance ... extraordinarily well crafted. This work is plentiful, overflowing with the richness of the Native American way of life ... sound, truthful, and assured.

-- Yoga Journal

$29.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot Deck
Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot

Graham Cameron invites us to the stage of is Phantasmagoric Theater, the stage of life. There's a script, we all know it and follow it to the best of our abilities but sometimes we forget a line, we loose our context. To reconnect to the original script we have this beautiful and somewhat eerie deck of tarots to help us on the way.

While I don't particularly agree with the theory of predestination I do enjoy the metaphor of life as a stage where we perform a "play" of sorts. I enjoy the image of every human as an actor, or artist creating her/his own piece of art in living.  Lets not forget that the root of tarot is in a game. Which, at least in my view, doesn't take away from the depth and guidance one can find in its symbology but adds to it. For if life is a game, a play, a curtain of shades as Plato would have argued, what better way to figure out the rules is there but to play?

What has Plato got to do with tarot you may wonder? Very little I suppose, but the again maybe very much indeed. To Plato the material world was an illusion, a flawed and unbalanced image of to unchangeable ideas that waits behind the veil of good, beauty and whatever. The point is what you see, what you can touch isn't real (which corresponds with the Buddhist concept of maya), it's a phantasma. "Something apparently seen but having no physical reality; a phantom or an apparition" (dictionary.com). And here we return to possible meanings of the word phantasmagoric, and as a result, a help in interpreting this particular deck of cards.

This was all to give you a background and a spiritual depth to a deck that could be mistaken for childish and naive, and in turned believed to be of less significance then a more "mature" deck because of the style of the artwork. Of course, it is childish and possibly even naive. It chooses a view of the world that's playful and innocent. In many ways, it's a new perspective to life in general and spirituality in particular which I find very refreshing and sound.

The deck in itself is loosely based on the symbolism of the classic Rider Waite deck but with a fresh and personal touch. The artwork is a very modern cartoon style, which I find very appealing. The High Priest has been renamed Grand Master which I think is supposed to correspond more to the spiritual side of the priest instead of the material power (the pope etc) it might allude to otherwise. The four suits are, as usual, swords, wands, cups and (the more traditional) coins. Every suit is accompanied by a special setting. Swords play in the labyrinth, wands at the circus, cups in the desert and coins in a small city. Every card is followed by a short story about the person seen on the card her/his name, what they've accomplished, what they want, where they're going etc.

Sometimes the meanings of the cards correspond with the traditional meaning, but more often the artist of this deck takes his own path. I find it easy to follow his lead and interpret his symbols, anyone who's studied tarot and has mastered the art of interpreting the symbology of this instrument by her/himself should be able to penetrate the symbols of this deck very easily.

I enjoy the depiction of two of cups as a love that is mutual and based un unity but is unhealthy in the way that it's completely shut of from the outside world. The meaning of the Judgement card is given a more modern view as it shows it as the great, big party, as do death seem to dance like life depended on it rendering a positive and affirmative dimension to the issue of "change". I think that the image of the chariot as a flying saucer led by sea horses as both charmingly whimsical and an insightful take on the marriage between sky and ocean, intellect and soul.

I have, and will continue too, enjoy this deck immensely and hope that other will find joy in it as well. It is a very unique piece though and I supposed it appeals to only a handful of people. To those who find the imagery compelling though I highly recommend it!

Evelina Lundmark, Aeclectic Tarot


The Phantasmagoric Theatre tarot encourages us to think of our lives as a stage play. We are all actors, and the scenes have been carefully designed before we enter, stage left. However, as in real theatre, sometimes things don't go right: we flub our lines, we don't like our costumes, or the lights malfunction. These things very subtly change the play itself and can even change the very outcome. However, as Mr. Cameron suggests, "as a tarot reader, however, you can connect yourself through a psychic process back to the original script, and become informed of deviations you may have made to the performance that is your life, helping you to avoid any unnecessary disasters."

Mr. Cameron has produced an astonishing tarot deck as laden with heavy symbolism as any tarot I've yet worked with. Dice, question marks and puzzle pieces can be found in most (if not all) of his cards, and each has a special significance for him. Dice represent entropy or chance in our lives: we may WANT the roll of the dice to turn out a certain way, but often they don't. Like puzzle pieces, we are all interconnected and interlocked to each other in complicated matters. As far as questions, well, I certainly don't have many of mine answered, tarot cards or not!!

The characters in the deck hover in an odd realm somewhere between childlike and sinister. Many look like dolls with button eyes and happy smiles. Some are glowering in a powerful "I know something you DON'T..." sort of way that is almost eerie. When pressed to describe this deck, I often say it resembles something of a cross between the Beatles "Yellow Submarine" and "The Nightmare Before Christmas". Still, this analogy doesn't do the deck justice-there is far, far much more to see.

Many of the cards are modeled after what may be the most well known tarot deck, the Rider-Waite. Since most people start with the Rider-Waite (it's the deck most books use to illustrate the tarot) this will certainly help the reader gain fluency with these cards. However, be aware that the resemblance quickly stops-this is not like any other deck you are likely to run into. Two very short examples of how these cards are different are the card of the Grand Master, a sort of levitating, psychedelic visionary that stands in the place of the card of the Hierophant in most other decks, and the Ace of Cups, which is something of a coffee mug.

—“Chess Heart”, Amazon reader


In my experience, every tarot reader has one or two decks that especially resonate for them and help them to see things they might otherwise miss. I often use the dear old Rider Waite Tarot while giving readings on Keen because most people are familiar with this deck. However, my personal favorite is the Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot. I love this deck because it's colorful, quirky, and full of surprises.

There are so many unusual elements in this fantasy/circus themed deck that it helps me retrieve details I can't see with my other decks. Maybe this is partially due to the modern flavor of the Phantasmagoric Theater. For instance, the Four of Swords depicts a man relaxing in his easy chair, which is chained to the wall in front of the TV. And just look at The Lovers card. They came into the room through separate doors, reflecting their individual lives, rolled the dice to the number six (a perfect match!) and now they're sharing the same space in perfect, childlike trust. The Lovers can choose to exit by the doors they used to enter, or go outside together; and either way is okay. The puzzle piece in the corner represents the mystery and spice of the unknown that keeps love fresh.

If you're interested in the tarot, I encourage you to look around, experiment with lots of decks, until you find the deck that best speaks to you and reflects your personality and reading style. It took me several years to find the one that suited me best, and while I was searching I learned something new and wonderful from each deck I bought and tried out.

—Robin, Empress Tarot Blog

$21.95
The New Mythic Tarot
The New Mythic Tarot

What customers are saying about The New Mythic Tarot

This book is an excellent read for anyone interested in what Joseph Campbell referred to as the Hero's Journey. It's the companion book to a tarot deck, and it's very psychologically sound, as is everything written by Liz Greene, a Jungian analyst and astrologer. This book can be enjoyable read without any prior knowledge of astrology or myth.

—Liz Wilson, Goodreads.com


The theme of this deck is Greek mythology and these myths are used to illustrate the deck and its psychological themes.  According to Sharman-Burke, one of the authors, "Greek myths have been assigned to each card and the stories are intended to be used as a springboard from which to enrich an understanding of the psychological uses the tarot can be put to."

Although not a clone of the traditional Rider-Waite deck, anyone who is familiar with the Waite deck will find some similarities.  The authors of the Mythic Tarot have tried to maintain a connection to the Waite-tradition without copying it.

The four suits in this deck cover four well-known myths in detail:

•   Cups -- the love of Eros and Psyche

•   Wands -- the adventurs of Jason and the Argonauts

•   Swords -- the tribulations of Orestes and the House of Atreus

•   Pentacles -- the resourcefulness of Daedalus against the Minotaur

The cards are simple, warm, and attractive.  I like the simplicity of the cards, which seem to have an emotional expression on a subtle level.  They are pleasing to look at, and they do contain symbolic images, but are done in an uncluttered fashion.  For each card, the accompanying book describes the myth that is illustrated on a card, an interpretation on an inner level, and a short divinatory interpretation.

—Velvet Angel, Tarotwisdomreadings.com


I like the way that the archetypal images of the tarot have been intertwined with the heroes and gods from Greek mythology, which are stories that have resonance with most westerners. This combination of the images and the use of Greek mythological characters to depict them creates for me a synergy of meaning that has great power.

The images on the cards are clear and use rich imagery, which I like as a visual person, because it helps my intuitive understanding of the meaning of the card in the context that it is in the spread. I have used this deck almost daily since I bought it a couple of weeks ago, and have done a few spreads on the same issue. The cards have been very consistent in their message and the appearance. I believe that these cards provide very reliable guidance in my life.

I bought the accompanying book, which is very thorough and informative.  For each card in the deck, the book tells us the story, or stage of the story, depicted on the card (literal meaning). It then discusses the inner meaning of the card and how it might relate to the seeker. It then has a divinatory meaning at the end. For me this deck has really good energy. I am getting to know the cards and this is also helped by the use of the Greek myths. I would highly recommend this deck to anyone starting out or who has an interest in classical studies, mythology, or archetypal imagery.

—Jo, Aeclectic Tarot

$26.99
The Lover's Path Tarot
The Lover's Path Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT LOVER'S PATH TAROT

$21.95
Chrysalis Tarot
Chrysalis Tarot

What customers are saying about Chrysalis Tarot

I love, love, love the Chrysalis Tarot. I feel the whole idea is so suitable to the metamorphosis of human development. The cards are attractive and easy to understand. The cards are unique and for the people I have read for - the new take on the cards allows for intuition to actively participate.

—Nadine B. Roberts, Tarot Professional


Every now and again a product comes along that brings such a fresh take on somewhat stale concepts, it becomes clear early on that product is destined for lots of awards, sales and satisfied consumers. The Chrysalis Tarot is absolutely one such product.

The artwork by Holly Sierra is not like anything else on the market. Her paintings are a mixture of folk, tribal, Celtic, Medieval and New Age. Yet everything about this tarot deck works in perfect harmony. It's like world peace in a box. Each of the 78 cards in this deck is mesmerizing. The colors, the creativity in the meaningful imagery and the attention paid to detail is simply a cut above.

It's time to talk about the Chrysalis Tarot meanings penned by Toney Brooks. These tarot meanings are crafted in such a way to deliver deep symbolism served up in an understandable and entertaining manner. Each card denotes its Rider-Waite twin soul and somehow he has discovered a way to pack a ton of sage wisdom into words that energize as they're read.

The Chrysalis Tarot is a deck all appreciators of tarot art and tarot meanings should own. For tarot readers who resonate with its imagery, this deck is sure to bring a whole new level of channeling to your readings.

Kudos to Holly Sierra and Toney Brooks! Congratulations to their publisher, U.S. Games Systems, Inc. for a shrewd acquisition made.

—Bernadette Carter King, New Age Examiner


The artwork is beautiful. That much is obvious. But there is more to this deck than a pretty face. Chrysalis is full of symbolism without being busy. It bears characters from different cultures, and when you look at the characters, there is a strong sense that they each have so many lessons to teach you. The culture mix is one that works, and that is because in life there is no one "correct" way to gain wisdom. You can gain wisdom from any kind of person, even from a small child. The author (Toney Brooks) and artist (Holly Sierra) understood that when creating Chrysalis tarot. There are lessons to be learned in good times and bad, in your elders, family, neighbors, and even in folk tales if you know how to find them. Chrysalis guides you to healing, empowerment, and peace with yourself and the world around you.

If you have ever thought of meditating with a card, or doing pathwork, this is an excellent deck to do that with. In fact, I find some of the cards grabbing me by the hand and pulling me in so that the cards can share their story with me. It is a very chatty deck.

I love that each suit has a color theme, representing each element. The change from cups, wands, swords, and pentacles to mirrors, spirals, scrolls, and stones are appropriate and drive the point home. My favorite is the change from frustrating court cards in other decks to troupe cards that are around to guide the querent on their journey. And let me not forget to say, there is no Emperor and Empress than Chrysalis' Green Man and Gaia.

If you want a deck to help you on your own Hero's Journey, Chrysalis is the way to go. It is not just any deck, but one focused on healing, wisdom and enlightenment.

—Jane Halliwell, Amazon customer


I was, naturally, intrigued by the image on the box as shown for this item. I checked out US Games to look at a few of the other cards (Usually the tarot publishers have at least a few more cards you can see to get a feel for a deck.) I admit I love tarot cards as much for their artwork and creativity as for actual use in divination!

These cards are beautiful! Even the back image is stunning! I also like that the deck is kind of Rider-Waite, yet not. However, although they use different names for the cards, they also indicate what the RW card is called (Card III of the Major Arcana is named "Gaia" but just underneath it is labeled "III. The Empress"). Images are clear and really, just beautifully illustrated. The card stock is a nice weight and the coating is neither too slippery or too clingy. They will naturally be rather stiff at first--I found it a little difficult to shuffle them.

The actual suites are named Stones, Mirrors, Spirals and Scrolls. And, as you would expect, stones = pentacles or coins, mirrors = cups, spirals = wands and scrolls = swords. I also like the mix of cultures: you'll see Celtic style knots as well as East Indian style decoration, among others, and Herne the Hunter is the Emperor but Ma'at is pictured on the Justice card with Papa Legba as Strength and Kali as The Tower. The pictures on this deck also abound with all kinds of wildlife: ravens, bears, dragonflies, dragons, winged horses, etc.

I have many, many decks because I love collecting them but I only use a couple for divination. I may consider adding this deck to the ones I actually use, it is such a joy to look upon.

—Cat “Rampant Reader”, Amazon customer


Many readers spend their lives collecting decks, enjoying many philosophies while examining and implementing various artistic interpretations. I have my fair share of cards and can admit I have hoped that in this lifetime I would find "The One." This would be a dream deck, of course, wherein it unquestionably represents who I am (not just as a tarot lover, but as a complex and delicate being who walks this good Earth). I can say with all goodness and honesty, Chrysalis Tarot is, in fact, "The One." The most glorious part in sharing that information is this deck can very easily be "The One" for EVERYONE.

The sacred place from which these players and meanings derive is referred to by the author, Toney Brooks, as "The Otherworld." In this place of dreams you will find majestic and domestic creatures, from dragons and lions to cats and lambs. There are historical figures, both mystical and real. There is Celtic ritual woven and blended with Eastern god and ancient Egyptian goddess energy. You will seek wisdom from The Crone and The Maiden, A Celtic Owl as The Hanged Man. You will feel the innocence of the deer, powerfully running with the spark of creativity in the Eight of Spirals. You will hear the coo of the swans in the Two of Mirrors.

This actually brings me to make a point that while the names of suits used in "traditional" tarot have been changed, there should be no trouble at all with understanding and interpreting for yourself or for clients. The guidebook is invaluable and concise. Never have I read a LWB and felt as though I completed a metaphysics course. The information is to the point, yet deeply moving and literary. I particularly loved the introduction of the suits and what they represent before each individual card meaning. My goodness, these cards are beautiful.

How many times have we explained to each other, as tarot enthusiasts, "I purchased that particular deck for such-and-such card"? We do this. We buy decks for merely one card, alone. I put myself out there, entirely, by saying every single card in this deck is "that" card. Holly Sierra has channeled heavenly poetic and woozily dreamy love into these images, making her and Toney Brooks a celebrated spiritual force, in my opinion. One of my favorite things about the deck artwork is the different borders around each court card. I LOVE that. It's subtle and clever. And while I go on and on about the beauty of the deck, with its rich colors and soft, summer essence, I can say this is perfect for masculine energy, as well.

As for the functionality of the cards, they are shuffled with ease, without bending and/or scraping. They are not too glossy, not flimsy at all. The deck arrived in a small, sturdy box, which I think is still worth saving. I pre-ordered this deck a few months ago and it arrived very quickly and two to three weeks before the actual estimated time of arrival.

One last thing I will emphasize about this deck is once I held it in my bare hands I could feel the healing energy radiating through my alignment. This is truly going to help people. I believe this. I am thankful to have found this deck. I am grateful to have found "The One." I know I will use this to the end of my days.

—Silver Palimpsest, Amazon customer


One of the problems with the Tarot in general is that its imagery has become rather stale. Each "tradition" has its own set of pre-cast imagery, and even though some are incredibly beautiful and innovative, still, one is left with the feeling that, "Oh no, another one." When I get a new deck, I am always hoping for something indeed new, but the demand of the marketplace all too often take priority over innovation, and we wind up with a parade of clones.

Enter the Chrysalis. Here is the fresh breeze of inspiration that many have been waiting for. The best word I can use to describe the Chrysalis is "Mythic". The images are very fairy-tale like, but rather than calling to mind the standard set of familiar stories, these cards encourage you to generate your own fairy tale, to tell your own story, and become your own myth.

While the structure of the deck is similar to the "traditional" tarot, the imagery is very much a new ballgame. They are bright, colorful, and in most cases more suggestive than explicit in meaning. In many cases the images seem familiar, and yet are a very different take on the underlying theme. Consider XV, "The Devil" in a traditional deck, but here, "Bella Rosa," a masked lady parading through a carnival. The mask provides a certain anonymity, an isolation between the world and the inner person. Each one of these cards will make you think about new ways of looking at old meanings.

And that is a major breakthrough. A Tarot card has two meanings, an objective and a subjective. The objective meaning, or "denotation", is bound up in a set of keywords, relationships within an esoteric system, and body of knowledge that points to a pre-determined, a priori definition of what the card means. On the other hand, there is the subjective meaning or "connotation", a personal reaction to the card that often draws on unconscious sources that embellish the images with a personal significance. The chief problem in learning to read the Tarot, at least in learning to read it as an oracle, is getting beyond the denotation, into the subjective connotation, which is where the actual divination takes place. In a deck such as this, where the imagery is quite different from the body of traditional, one is forced to rely on the subjective. You will have to look into your own soul to understand what these cards mean, and what they will mean to you is different from what they will mean to anybody else. Subjectivity is individuating -- having to find things out for yourself breaks you off from the herd. And as this deck breaks itself off from the "traditions" -- even, thankfully, the ones I often rely on -- to read it you will need to discover something of yourself that has remained hidden behind the mask.

Which brings us to the book. I generally don't like tarot books, but this one is different. Instead of repeating the usual prattle, this one is short, to the point, and serves its purpose of launching your journey, rather than hand-holding you through it. I come from a very different background than the author, and would take issue with much of what is here, but the point is that the issues are raised, and how you follow them through the cards is your own prerogative. The book, in this case, is a helpful tool rather than a hindrance.

I could go on about this deck forever, and that is probably the best thing I can say about it. Its mandala-like imagery beckons one to go on forever. For here is a tool for the exploration of the conscious and the unconscious; for as long as consciousness exists, that exploration will go on, and indeed consciousness can only continue to exist where that exploration is possible.

—Bruce Albert, aka Doctordruid


I have been waiting on Chrysalis's release for quite some time and once it was in my hands it did NOT disappoint! It was worth the wait!

I cannot say enough positive things about this deck. Not only is the artwork gorgeous, the LWB is actually quite detailed for the size and Toney Brooks did a fantastic job with his re-envisioning of the tarot framework. The names assigned to not only the Major Arcana, but the court cards as well (now known as the Chrysalis Troupe) are absolutely spot on. What a breath of fresh air to the realm of tarot this deck is!

It's a very accurate deck, and as another reviewer said, very "chatty". I thoroughly enjoy working with it. In fact, I don't even want to put it down.

The artwork on the back of the cards is a feast for the eyes in and of itself. Holly really did an indescribably incredible job with this deck.

You won't be disappointed!

—Midnight Gypsy

$21.95
Journey to the Goddess Realm
Journey to the Goddess Realm

What customers are saying about Journey to the Goddess Realm

I love the fresh images of this deck and they “feel” good to me. This deck will appeal to anyone wishing to increase intuition and to get in touch with goddess energies. I love it! It’s bright, cheerful and has a happy feeling when I hold it. The deck goes beyond a simple oracle deck and can be a great tool for your spiritual journey.

—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine


The Journey to the Goddess Realm Oracle Deck by Lisa Porte offers the seeker a way to reconnect with the archetypes of feminine wisdom. The cards are an invitation to develop intuition, to re-member the body as a sacred temple, and to create balance between using our minds as a sacred tool for liberation and to heed our soul's calling to create peace, empathy and understanding with all of humankind.

—Kayla Garnet Rose, Ph.D.    Certified Hypnotherapist, Reiki Master


With its skillful blend of whimsy, substance, and charm, the Goddess Realm Oracle Deck is a feast for the eyes and the spirit. I found myself being drawn into individual images, feeling a connection with many of the goddesses, and thoroughly enjoying my interaction with them.  Lisa Porter has brought us high-powered feminine energy from pantheons in all parts of the globe  I think this could be a great deck to use in conjunction with The Goddess Tarot by Kris Waldherr (U.S. Games Systems, Inc.) and I intend to give that a try. Images are alive with vibrant color and symbolic details, many of which are explained in the guidebook. Many of the goddesses are depicted as tall and slim, with long, slender legs. Exceptions include my personal favorite, the Slavic grandmother Baba Yaga, who is drawn as a generously proportioned older woman flying through the air in a cauldron while smoking a pipe, and the bawdy Greek goddess Baubo, who raises her dress to reveal plump legs clad in striped stockings. All of these ladies have plenty of personality, poise, and power – just what we expect from goddesses.
 
Zanna Starr, Tarotnotes.com
$21.95
The Winged Enchantment Oracle
The Winged Enchantment Oracle

What customers are saying about Winged Enchantment Oracle

Tarot superstar Lisa Hunt has joined forces with Lesley Morrison to merge the human spirit with nature’s winged spirits. Her 39 subtlety dynamic watercolors pay homage to the creatures sometimes referred to as the messengers of God.

Whether you use the cards for divination, meditation, or just enjoy the beauty of the paintings, these cards will prove uplifting and inspirational. The companion booklet by Lesley Morrison is beautifully written and explores the metaphor of bird as elevated human spirit poetically but with a clear eye. Each bird represented has it own haiku-like heralding statement (“You are presence. You are survival. You are bold ambition. You are Blue Jay.”)

From condor to hummingbird, the strength of each unique bird is highlighted in both word and paint. This deck will take you anywhere you are ready to go.

—Anna, TarotWise.com


Each card in this deck is associated with a particular bird so by choosing cards we can use the energy of that bird to help us resolve challenges or to get daily advice.  I love the idea of our ideas taking flight!  The author, Lesley Morrison links the bird image to ascension or otherworldly escapades, the fledgling to the master is a wonderful way to think of life.

There is something about birds that both fascinates and repels me at the same time.  This deck has been a wonderful experience for getting to know our bird friends and tapping into the wisdom they carry. Lisa Hunt’s artwork has made me see birds in a very different light-and I hope you will find this deck as interesting as I have.

I recommend the Winged Enchantment Oracle Deck to anyone who has an interest in Nature, Shape-Shifting, Birds, Lisa Hunt’s Art and to those who like to capture the magic of nature in a reading.  This deck allows your intuition and imagination to go wild with possibilities and that’s never a bad thing.  For me the descriptions on the cards read like an intention or prayer.  I like this idea! The Bird In Flight Spread looks really, really interesting and I can’t wait to try it out!

—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine


Birds and their magic are rooted in the collective unconscious, from pop culture’s Maleficent and the Mockingjay of The Hunger Games to the Pagan resurgence of the Morrigan. So it’s fitting that the language and wisdom of birds has been shaped into an oracle deck, with the teachings of each bird an opportunity for journeying, growth and ascension.

In Lesley Morrison’s introduction to the deck she describes the soul taking its first steps toward self knowledge as being like a baby bird: “awkward, stumbling, and rather more partial to the safety of the nest”, with the potentially arduous adventure of flight ahead – self development – often being described in myth as guided by a bird of some kind.

The 39 oracle cards feature eagles and starlings, condors and robins; there is a breadth of garden birds represented as well as birds of prey and ducks, geese, peacocks and parrots. Each bird is described in terms of its spiritual significance, with keywords at the bottom of the page, and the 48-page accompanying booklet features a few suggested spreads for the cards, albeit fairly generic apart from the Bird of Flight spread at the end which I thought was original and appropriate for the oracle as a whole.

Lisa Hunt’s Native American-inspired illustrations are utterly beautiful and have a depth of detail and a mastery of colour that makes these cards beautiful things in their own right, and I’m pleased that the cards themselves are large format enough to let the artwork shine. I was surprised how insightful the cards actually were, in use – coming to them cold and looking at the booklet I thought they might be insubstantial, but I found they supplemented tarot well and worked especially well for overall year readings, meditations or insight into deep motivations and approaches.

—Anna McKerrow, Pagan Dawn Magazine

$21.95