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Star-Spider Speaks Book
Star-Spider Speaks Book

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE STAR-SPIDER SPEAKS BOOK:

An absolute MUST for use with the Native American Tarot Deck

Anyone who enjoyed the Native American Tarot Deck must have this book. It completely explains both the meaning and the history behind each card, plus it provides insightful meditation points to strengthen your knowledge of this powerful, unusual deck.

-- L. Fletcher, Amazon customer


If you own the deck, you need to own this book!

This is the companion book to the Native American Tarot Deck. Though the small booklet included with the deck will get you started, this book will give you even more details and interpretations, not only of the cards but also of Native American teachings and beliefs. It also includes handy reference pages for comparing the Major Arcana symbolism across many beliefs & cultures and various card spreads to use for meditation.

-- Sam, Amazon customer

$9.95
The Golden Dawn Tarot
The Golden Dawn Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE GOLDEN DAWN TAROT:

"The Golden Dawn Tarot" is an esoteric deck, based on the systems used by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Wang worked under the direction of Israel Regardie, with card interpretations based on those developed by S. L. MacGregor Mathers. In his foreword, Stuart Kaplan notes that the Golden Dawn Society included as its members some of the foremost occultists and writers of its time. As part of their sacred oath, they were sworn to secrecy. Based upon the esoteric notebooks of some of these members, under the guidance of Dr. Israel Regardie, Wang has faithfully produced, in authentic detail, each card in the Golden Dawn Tarot.

Kaplan sees the publication of this deck as an important "missing link" in the development of Tarot. His suggestion is to study this deck along with other decks that evolved from the work of Golden Dawn members, such as the "Rider-Waite Tarot" (by A. E. Waite and Pamela Coleman Smith), the "Builders of Adytum" (BOTA) deck issued under the guidance of Paul Foster Case, and the "Thoth Tarot", by Aleister Crowley and Lady Frieda Harris.

Wang, in his introductory notes, refers to the "Golden Dawn Tarot" as the only truly esoteric deck ever to be published. It is also the only deck to reach public view that was designed for the exclusive use of a powerful secret fraternity. Included in this deck is esoteric symbolism that has been kept shrouded in mystery as part of the Western Esoteric Tradition. As does Kaplan, Wang notes that this is the deck from which some of the greatest esoteric writers of our age developed their ideas about the Tarot.

Wang notes that the basic design of the cards comes from the work of S. L. MacGregor Mathers, following the framework of the Inner Tradition. Credit goes to Moira Mathers, S. L. MacGregor Mathers wife, for illustrating the original cards. Also noted is that after initiation into the grade of "Adeptus Minor", one of the tasks of the adept was to hand-paint a copy of the Tarot deck.

According to Wang, the purpose of the Tarot is to teach -- teach about the nature of the universe, and about man's relationship to the universe. Wang also sees the Tarot as illustrating the energies of the mystical system of Qabalah. The use of the Tarot for divination is seen as a means to provide an introduction to the visual patterns and subtle energies of the Tarot. In this respect, the true worth of the cards comes from repetitive usage, which helps to stimulate the unconscious and help develop psychic powers.

One spread is given in the LWB (Little White Book) for use by the reader, and it is simply termed the "Fifteen Card Method of Tarot Divination". The spread was specifically developed so that the meanings of the cards could be determined from their relationship to neighboring cards (Elemental Dignities), rather than using reversals. The spread is set out in groups of three, and is not difficult to lay down, or to interpret.

There are 84 cards that come with this deck: the traditional 78 cards of the Tarot, four blank white cards, a card illustrating the positions on the Tree of Life, and a card listing in text the "Key to the Tarot on the Tree of Life". The cards themselves are 3" by 5", of good quality, glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/2" white border, followed by a 1/2" green border, with symbols at the four corners, midway down each side, and in the middle of the bottom of the card. In the center we see a Cross, color coded by element, with a glyph of the Tree of Life in the middle. This graphic alone is well worth study for the symbolism that it contains.

There are some very interesting aspects to this deck, such as the appearance of luminescence around certain figures or objects (the upper body and head of the Fool; the entire body of the Magician, High Priestess; the head and scepter of the Empress, and the bird behind her; the head of the Emperor; the head and upper body of the Hierophant; the head and lamp of the Hermit; all of the Wheel of Fortune; the head of Justice; the head of the Hanged Man; all of Temperance; the Star; the three figures on the Moon; the male and female figures in Judgment; the four corner glyphs and the center figure in the World; the figures in the Court Cards).

For the most part, the symbols and figures used in this deck will be familiar to those readers using traditional decks. The Fool becomes a small child, plucking fruit from a tree; the High Priestess stands facing the reader, a cup held in front of her with both hands; the Chariot is shown as riding through the sky; the Hanged Man is suspended over water; there is a fire in the background of the Temperance card; yods appear in the sky, under the glyph of the moon, in the Moon card.

All of the suits show a stark white background, with a hand coming out of the clouds, holding the requisite number of suit symbols for each card. The Ace of Wands shows a tri-part wand, surrounded by Yods. Included in the suit of Cups is the use of flowers, as well as fish in the Two of Cups. The suit of Swords includes a red flower in some cards, with red Yods in other cards. The suit of Pentacles makes use of a "living branch" -- a branch that shows green leaves, as well as the suit symbol. For all of the suits, Kings are shown on horseback, Queens are shown seated on a throne, Princes are shown driving chariots, and Princesses are shown standing, appearing to be wearing some type of armor.

Each time I use this deck, I see more and more symbolism in it. It is easy to use, would fit well into readings, comparative readings, journaling, story, meditation, ritual, and ceremony. There is a companion book for this deck, written by Robert Wang ("An Introduction To the Golden Dawn Tarot") that is very helpful in working with this deck. For a student interested in studying the esoteric aspects of the Tarot, for someone looking for an alternative deck to offer their clients as a choice for doing a Tarot reading, or for a Tarot collector, this is a "must have" deck.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Tarot of a Moon Garden
Tarot of a Moon Garden

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF A MOON GARDEN:

At first, I wasn't sure I was going to like this deck, but it seemed to just kind of "grow" on me as I began to use it more in Tarot readings -- and clients requested this deck a lot for readings. It's actually a very delightful and charming deck of tarot cards. Each of the cards depicts a night scene, with the exception of the Sun Card, which shows a bright and glorious sunny morning. Some readers dislike this deck because they feel that it's too "cute," however, I think of it more as being a "magical fairyland" type of deck. It is a fun and enchanting deck to read with, once you become accustomed to it. There are no frightening images in this deck, so it's a good choice for the beginning young reader or anyone else that either wants to read the cards or get a reading but is hesitant about the traditional images of most decks. Tarot of a Moon Garden reduces any "harshness" that may be found in some decks.

You'll find delightful images such as flowers, castles, fairies, dolphins, and hot air balloons. Artist Marie Sweikhardt works with the idea that the moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, lush jungles, mysterious caverns, and exotic flowers -- like a lunar Garden of Eden.

It is a soft and gentle deck that follows the Rider-Waite tradition and symbolism but in a much calmer way. It's a deck suitable for reading for or about children as well. Although not the deck for everyone, it's certainly a welcome change for a few moments of escape into an enchanted land of childhood magic. When the mood is whimsical, this can be a very nice deck to turn to. In August 2007, Tarot of Moon Garden was reintroduced and is once again available. So if you missed it during a time of being out-of-print, it's available again.

-- Velvet Angel, on Tarot Wisdom Readings


This imaginative deck weaves traditional images with mythic expression and elemental magic into a 78-card deck full of inspiration and insight. Beautifully illustrated by Karen Marie Sweikhardt this whimsical, full-color deck depicts an enchanted garden with exotic flowers, castles, and hot air balloons. The first thing that grabbed my attention was the colors and dreamlike images and it was a real pleasure to work with. The card stock is terrific and shuffles very easily and the image on the backs are not only reversible but intricate and pleasing to the eye.

The Major Arcana are stunning to look, at depicting fairies, dragons, butterflies and unicorns and even the moon herself makes an appearance in several of the cards. The Minor Arcana have dragonflies for the hilts of the Swords suit, mystical trees in the Staffs suit, there are butterflies, ferns and other foliage in the Cups suit and the Pentacles suit with it's large pentacle orbs floating across it's images. This deck is a delight to look at and definitely a joy to work with and makes a terrific deck for both beginner and experienced alike.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic


The Tarot of a Moon Garden deck was my 8 year-old son's first deck, given to him on his 6th birthday. The cards have been described as very feminine and romantic but we find them, instead, very gentle and magical. It is the perfect first deck for any young witch or wizard or of course for those young at heart.

The cards are easy to read and are filled with beautiful images and great detail. From the moment they're taken out of the box they seem to exude a kind of soft, magical transcendence. For a young reader they're just the thing to open the mind and senses to the "elsewhere".

Reading these cards or having them read for you, transports you to a gentler, more magical time. Every card in the deck, major and minor Arcana alike, brings one closer to a more innocent yet mysterious way of being. Even the death and devil cards are done in such a way as to adhere to the old standards (which I much prefer) and yet convey the message in a gentle, non-frightening way.

One would be hard put to find a better deck for the up and coming spiritual generation. Indeed, my number one recommendation for a child's first set of tarot cards would have to be the Tarot of a Moon Garden.

-- Winter, on Aeclectic Tarot


The moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, mysterious caverns, lush jungles and exotic flowers. Sweikhardt weaves the traditional tarot symbolism into her images of a lunar Garden of Eden where there are dragonflies, butterflies, dolphins, dragons and unicorns around every corner. The inspiration card states Welcome to a Realm Where Myth and Magic are the Reality.

Journey into the Moon Garden and reflect on the phases of the lunar energy. It is a very bright, bold, and colorful deck taking you to a time of magic as it weaves traditional tarot symbolism, mythic expression and elemental magic. A tapestry for you to discover. As Sweikhardt states she started this as a poem, Moon Garden, and from there it blossomed into this wonderful fanciful enchanted deck.

It will soon be, if it is not already, a collector’s item, one you will want for your own collection, or just to have. Great for using and reading children, or for children to explore the Tarot.

-- Sally, on Aeclectic Tarot


My friend bought me a deck of cards as a gift. The deck was The Tarot of the Moon Garden. Immediately I felt soothed by its images of dancing fairies, protective dragons and lush gardens. Every card stirred feelings of hope and dreams achieved, even the cards associated with negative portents such as the Tower or the Devil. This deck is still my favorite and the ideal first set for anyone wishing to explore the mysteries of the Tarot. I find them deeply emotional, describing how events affect the questioner emotionally rather than detailing events. I feel these cards empathize with the questioner, place a comforting hand on their shoulder or join in with the cheers when all is well. They are a positive, gentle deck, eager to find positive results from the most negative events, but not give you a false hope, a false sense of security, keen to show events you'll face, keen to reassure you of their support.

They can be mischievous, I've never found any other deck with such personality, prone to mood swings if they're not treated right giving absolutely nothing to read, deathly silent especially if you query their advice. The fantasy beings depicted sum up perfectly these cards, encouraging the reader to dig deeper into a world of plenty, always offering encouragement. This is a set everyone should read at least once; they bring a rare innocent, childlike quality to an art often daunting when first practiced.

-- Niki, on Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg  Deck
Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg Deck
What customers are saying about Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg
 
The Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg has an interesting and unusual history with a bit of mystery thrown in. In 1987, Stuart Kaplan, chairman of U.S. Games Systems, Inc. (who publish many of our Tarot decks) saw some artwork that was created by Yury Shakov.
 
Shakov was a well-known Russian artist who specialized in miniatures. His jewelry, intricately decorated Easter eggs and detailed miniature icons were sought after by museums and collectors. At this time, Shakov was recognized as the foremost miniaturist in American even though he had only been in the country for a few years. Kaplan was fascinated by Shakov’s work and decided that he would like to commission Shakov to do a Tarot deck in this distinctive Russian style. It was a few months before the artist would agree to paint the deck. He knew nothing about the Tarot so he had to become acquainted with Tarot as well as develop 78 original miniature paintings.
 
Over the next two years Yury Shakov created the master designs for the entire deck and he painted the Major Arcana and the Cups. When you realize that he painted these cards to size, just as you see them, you can appreciate the amount of painstaking work that went into them. Miniaturists must brace their arm as they work with brushes that are often so fine they contain only a single hair. Shakov loved his art so much that he sometimes worked for 16 hours a day.
 
Unfortunately, Yury Shakov didn’t live long enough to complete his deck, he died suddenly in March 1989. Stuart Kaplan decided to commission a second Russian artist to finish the deck in Shakov’s style using Shakov’s notes and sketches.
 
And here is where the mystery comes in, we don’t know who the second artist is. His or her name was never made public. We also don’t know exactly how much input this artist had in the renderings because Shakov’s notes and sketches have been lost. When you look at the two artists work you can tell a difference in the cards. Shakov’s Trumps and Cups are much more detailed and ornate than the Clubs, Swords and Coins. Shakov used several decks as references, the Tarot of Marseilles, the Classic Tarot and the Waite deck while adding his own touches of Russian art, history and folklore. The deck follows the basic images of the Waite with Russian costumes and backgrounds. The cards seem to focus on the figures while background images are a bit sparse.
 
The Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg is a truly beautiful deck. All cards have a black background but the colors of the images are vibrant. The cards have an oval frame of gold filigree, the Trumps and each suit has a slightly different variation of the filigree. All cards have a thin solid gold outer border. Shakov’s Trumps and Cups don’t appear to feature any one color but the other suits do. You will find purple featured in the Coins, green in the Clubs and red in the Swords.
 
The Trump cards are numbered and titled, the suits are titled. The Courts are the standard Page, Knight, Queen and King. The deck is laminated and printed in Belgium.
 
The card backs have yet another slight variation of the gold filigree frame. All of the suits are represented with a Coin sitting on a Cup and a Sword and Club crossed behind. Sitting on the Coin is a Russian helmet.
Angelfire

This deck is unusual in a few ways. First, it was started by Yury Shakov - he finished number of the cards, along with the preliminary sketches for the rest - but the remainder were finished by an unknown Russian artist at his death. There really isn't much difference in their styles, the continuity of the deck is amazing. Each card is rendered in sharp detail. This includes a border in gold on the face, mirrored on the back. Both the major and minor arcana are done in full detail, and this in one of the first decks I have personally run into printed on a black background. It puts a whole new cast on the deck, gives it a new feel, has a different effect on the spirit.
 
Lastly, even though this deck was not geared toward beginners (or those rediscovering the art) it is truly easy to read. Because of the detail mentioned before, those that do more instinctual reading instead of using the 'given' or 'proper' meaning of the cards are given a clear advantage. For example, while doing the first reading using this deck, the sun in the four of clubs seemed to pop out at me. Normally this wouldn't have been something to notice, but it was pivotal to the reading.
 
The little white booklet is also a nice help. The meaning and reversed meaning are easy to find, and it has the basic ten-card spread included.
 
This is a truly spiritual deck to me, and I'm glad I bought it. As soon as I took it home and got it out of the box, it clicked with me. Meanings of certain cards were coming to me just flipping through the deck. This is going to be the one I can't put down. 
—Cricket. Aeclectic Tarot
$23.95
Spiral Tarot
Spiral Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE SPIRAL TAROT:

The Spiral Tarot was my second tarot deck. I saw a few sample images online, and fell in love with the beauty of it. One of the problems I came across in learning the Tarot was that many of the decks available have very repetitive minor arcana cards. You might as well use a regular deck of playing cards. This is not so with the Spiral Tarot. Every single card of this deck, especially the Minor Arcana, tells a story. These cards will speak to you. Compare this deck to most and you will see that the artist actually took the time to artistically represent a situation to convey the meaning of the card to you. The colors are beautiful, the art is very well-drawn, meanings easily interpreted through the pictures.

-- Raven on Aeclectic Tarot


Though there are several decks I really love, this one is now my favorite Tarot deck, as it brings together many elements that are important to me. The deck is lusciously vibrant with rich color. Dark blue and also a lighter blue are predominant colors, carrying the background of the whole deck, which I think gives the entire deck a "Lunar" quality which supports our intuition and Lunar or Moon knowledge and abilities. Then too, Carl Jung knew the importance of bright color, how it attracts the unconscious, and I believe that the ability to work intuitively with a deck is enhanced when it has both rich colors and appropriate symbolic depth. The Major Arcana cards on this deck show the Kabbalah correspondences, depicting the Hebrew letters corresponding to the trumps, as well as depicting the particular Sephiroth on the Tree of Life. I have always felt disappointed with the Rider Waite deck, which, though it is hailed for its "correct" hermetic symbolism, to me is far too plain, even banal, in its color. The images of the Spiral Tarot, particularly the trumps but also the Minor Arcana, are more complex, saturated, dreamy and engaging, and I think that helps to feel energetically pulled in towards the cards, when you feel like you wouldn't mind walking right into that scene and being there to fully feel it. The Spiral Tarot sticks close to traditional depictions of the trumps and Minor Arcana, but renders them more compellingly.

-- D. Riverblue Cloudwalker on Amazon

$21.95
Vision Quest Tarot
Vision Quest Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT VISION QUEST TAROT:

Although I have not worked with this deck for long, it has become one of my primary decks. I find the peacefulness of the colors very pleasing; the drawings are very attractive and exude an encouragingly spiritual air. I find many of the depictions show a new or enhanced point of view on the specific card. For example, the Devil [Key 13] is entitled "Torment" and very readily brings the "What/Who is holding you back?" question to mind. Each card of the Minor Arcana has a word of interpretation on it and many of these are quite thoughtful. The 6 of Earth [6 of Pentacles] is entitled Breakthrough. It shows a female shape with arms raised, which seems to be quite misty and seems to imply that a breakthrough starts with one's thoughts. The four suits portray their elemental meanings very clearly. This is a particularly beautiful deck that stands up well in interpretative richness. As a teacher of the Tarot who encourages students to choose a deck that calls to their heart and mind in order to develop a rapport with it, I find this deck is very well received with students and querents alike. It is readily understandable and easy to read or teach.

-- Michael Green, on Aeclectic Tarot


I love working with the Vision Quest deck because it doesn't scare the querant. Usually with the tarot there are difficult messages to give along with the pleasant ones, but this deck enables the reader to offer them with kindness. For example, 'Transformation', traditionally the death card, shows the querent that each end is another beginning. Even in 'Torment,' which is traditionally the devil and features a man bound to a stake, there are beautiful skies. And if the man struggled less would the bindings would fall away?

For a reader who enjoys using animal symbols to communicate, the deck is howling, growling and hooting out to You. A lot of times a deck is let down by the Minor Arcana where less effort seems to have been put in but not in this case. Although most of the artwork is less ornate it isn't casual; the messages are unclouded but there is enough in there to find what you need to say. Each card has one word printed on it to sum up its essence which is helpful when you are learning the deck and far easier to start making connections and putting cards into perspective with the others in the spread.

I also find that when I am giving other sorts of readings or meditating the cards seem to pop up here and there in guidance. I suppose this is partly to do with working as much as I can with the deck and partly because they are the kind of images a person doesn't mind having wandering about their subconscious. I don't find the Vision Quest Tarot a swift deck to work with but I do find that it helps answer the questions in a more holistic and compassionate manner and feel that it'll be with me for a good while yet.

-- Beck Ryall, on Aeclectic Tarot


I am definitely impressed with this deck. The symbols of the Native American peoples have been treated with dignity and respect, and come across with strength and clarity. In their introduction in the LWB, Winter and Dose note that the Vision Quest Tarot contains not only the spirit of the traditional Tarot, but the spirit of the Native American culture - as in such representations as shamans and the medicine wheel. This deck speaks of wisdom brought through the daily living of Native American life - through the Elders, through their words, and through their sense of compassion. . One of the primary things that I noted about this deck is that it lends itself well to visualization and meditation, and that the imagery is of a more esoteric quality than many decks. It acts as an excellent, and very gentle, tool for working with shamanic visions/dreams. The esoteric nature of the deck is also evidenced in the spreads that are presented: The Little Medicine Wheel (a five card spread); The Present (a three card spread); The Path of Wisdom (a seven card spread); and The Partnership Spread (which can be done as a six or a twelve card spread). The Vision Quest Tarot is a deck that lends itself to being used anywhere, any time. Its message is clear, and the cards are easy for anyone to work with.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot

$25.95
The Archeon Tarot -- Premier Edition
The Archeon Tarot -- Premier Edition

What customers are saying about The Archeon Tarot

The Archeon Tarot is a stunningly beautiful, dark deck created by Timothy Lantz, an incredibly talented and creative visionary, who has brought his unique vision to many mediums and media. The Archeon Tarot is the manifestation of this vision as applied to the Tarot. This deck was initially produced a few years ago and has recently been re-issued as a "Premier" edition, which features the deck, the little white book (LWB), and a special layout sheet depicting the Celtic Cross, inviting users to apply stunningly re-imagined cards within a traditional spread context. A masterful blending of old and new.

The artwork in this deck is breathtaking. The visuals are abstracted collages of color and symbology and remind me of dreams - imagery is suggested through color and shadow as well as lines. It seems both fresh and ancient at the same time. The people are eerily human, with many cards focusing the detail on the face of the figure in the card. Timothy Lantz himself makes a cameo appearance in the deck as the King of Cups, gazing directly at the reader and inviting him or her into the dream-state imagery. My favorite card in the deck is Temperance. The imagery of an angel (or woman) with a lamb on one side and a tiger on the other really brings the message of what I thought the card was supposed to mean (but didn't really see it before). Although the imagery can be dark and very abstract or interpretive, the cards are very readable.

The deck includes a LWB in which Mr. Lantz has provided both traditional upright and reversed meanings for each card, as well as a quote or phrase that enhances, or provides context for, the card meaning. In many respects, the phrases serve to provide insight not only into the pip card itself, but into numerology also. At the front of the LWB, he briefly discusses symbolism and its role in the deck. The booklet also contains instructions for using the Celtic Cross layout. The kit also comes with a large sheet that has the Celtic Cross layout diagrammed on it, for use with the cards. As I mentioned before, I like the mix of the new, edgy imagery in the cards used with a very traditional spread like the Celtic Cross.

The subtitles and the symbology of the images invite deeper study, making the Archeon Tarot an excellent deck for those who enjoy a challenge. I think this is a stunning deck that would be a valuable tool to add to any reader's deck collection, not only as a "book" of Timothy Lantz's artwork, but also as a very useful tool for reading for oneself or reading for others.

—Sheri Harshberger, Tarot Reflections


The Archeon Tarot became my main personal reading deck the moment I had it in my hands. I was intrigued by the images I'd seen online, but certainly did not expect to connect with it on such a personal level. The Archeon Tarot is a digital collage deck, which normally I steer clear of. But the seamless and dreamlike way this one was done appealed to me. It does not scream "collage" in the traditional sense of disconnected images slapped together. The images in this deck are dark. And by that I mean literally dark in hue. I don't find it to be so much a dark/gothic deck as a deck with incredible depth and layers. What I love about it is that the cards serve as a perfect gateway to your intuition, if you are open to allowing yourself to experience intuitive reading. There are no canned readings with the Archeon. When I pull this deck out, my intuitive muscles are stretched and I read from my soul rather than from my mind.

One of my favorite cards would have to be the Five of Swords. How hot is he?! I would gladly accept defeat at his hands as long as I could watch him do it. The Tower is another of my favorite cards in this deck, and probably my favorite Tower card of any deck. It just exudes the overwhelming feeling you're supposed to get with this card. There is a woman crouched down in the forefront of the card, protecting her head with her hands from the inferno ruining the building behind her. The Four of Wands gives me this powerful "starting fresh" feeling. The Queen of Swords is hauntingly beautiful. The Six of Pentacles is effective in its simplicity. I really like the atmosphere of the Seven of Wands, in which an old house is made into a character.

How it Reads

I clicked with the Archeon immediately on a soul level and the readings I do with it are hard to put into words. It's more of a comprehensive knowing I get, and all the images gel together to create a deep understanding of what I'm supposed to know. I have found that these cards do not beat around the bush. They deliver the truth and nothing but the truth, no matter how ready you are to face it. One of the first drawings I did with the deck was inquiring if I could trust a certain man I had just met. I was having iffy feelings about his integrity. I pulled a single card, the Seven of Swords, which shows a raven holding in its mouth a shiny gold piece hanging from a chain. I knew instantly this man couldn't be trusted, and it turned out I was absolutely right.

The deck is not light and fluffy, sparing your feelings. It gets down to the nitty gritty, to the stuff you may have been shoving down in the back corners of your consciousness. So it's not for the faint of heart or mind, but rather for those brave souls who want to gain access to their inner (and outer) worlds, no matter how long the dust has been settled there, or how raw it will make your emotions. The Archeon Tarot surpasses the superficial and gets down to what's real. And for this, I find it an invaluable collection of 78 pieces of card stock!

—Kiki, Tarot Dame Blogspot

$25.95
Tarot of Witches Premier Edition
Tarot of Witches Premier Edition

What customers are saying about Tarot of the Witches:

I personally love this deck and it is one of the most frequently used decks for my personal readings. I love the fact that the cards were painted with oils on canvas; the colors are incredibly rich and vibrant and there is a depth and solidity to the images that is rare. There's something psychological here for me as an artist - these feel like the sort of images I would encounter in an art gallery rather than straightforward commercial illustrations. To me this is as much of an art tarot as it is a working deck, which makes me feel good when I handle the cards.

Unlike many of the esoteric decks that are imbued with either breathless solemnity or an almost religious conviction, this one manages to do full justice to the depth and meaning of the age old symbols while somehow not taking itself too seriously. The characters on the cards have a dark, almost camp wit with a slightly sinister edge to them. Everything is wildly out of proportion and ethereally colored yet somehow it all works. If anyone asked me why, I really couldn't say, but the humor in the pictures seems to conceal but invite you to look deeper in the same breath.

I would thoroughly recommend the accompanying Tarot of the Witches book by Stuart R. Kaplan. This gives detailed descriptions of the Major cards and the artist's thinking behind them. Reading this greatly enhanced my appreciation of the deck and its sheer originality.

—Chris Butler, Aeclectic Tarot


This delightful deck has unfortunately been misnamed and mismarketed throughout its existence. It has nothing to do with James Bond or witches but has everything to do with Fergus Hall, the idiosyncratic artist who painted the deck. It should be called simply the Fergus Hall Tarot. Hall got his start doing carnival paintings and that freaky bizarro style shows in this deck. Unlike most 20th century decks, Hall's deck is free of occult or pagan mumbo jumbo and yet is rich in subtle symbolism, such as the mysterious black birds and orange cats that appear on various cards, and the mandala type designs in the center of the pip cards. The books held by the hanged man and hermit contain original poems. (Can't read them? See Stuart Kaplan's companion book). The art is very expertly done and yet is so whimsical and unassuming it's easy to take for granted. The World card is one of the best I've ever seen, downright haunting. This is a very profound deck but at the same time doesn't take itself too seriously. The pip cards are a welcome return to tradition, using the original suits of cups, swords, batons, and coins rather than the recently introduced "wands" and "pentacles" which many mistakenly consider authentic. Also, as in traditional decks, the pips are unillustrated save for Hall's central mandalas. In my opinion, unillustrated pips leave more room for the reader’s own imagination and insight.

A perfect blend of tradition and creativity. You might find this deck puzzling at first, but stick with it. There's an entire little world in every card!

—A. Simone, Amazon customer


These tarot cards should really be known as the Fergus Hall deck.
Many people are familiar with this deck due to its use in the James Bond movie, "Live and Let Die". But it is far more than that.
Abandoning all efforts to reproduce the Rider Waite Tarot, Hall has created a deck with some of the most surreal, yet highly mystical art ever seen on Tarot cards.
Those who are familiar with Tarot cards know that many different interpretations of cards are possible by seeing the imagery on the cards. Hall's imagery isn't for everyone, but I believe the art really draws you into readings in a whole new way.
I have also found this deck invaluable for dream interpretation.
The Minor Arcana return to the old "pip" system.
One of my higher recommendations if you are already doing readings for others.

—Bruce Gray, Amazon customer


I think this deck is absolutely wonderful. You have to use your own imagination and find your own meanings to the symbolism...which in my opinion is what tarot cards are all about. For those of you who want a deck that lays out plainly what the cards mean, then this is not for you. If you have a good imagination and enjoy the type of artistry used in this deck you wont be disappointed.

—Joe Arthur, Amazon customer

$25.95
Crystal Visions Tarot
Crystal Visions Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CRYSTAL VISIONS TAROT:

When you open up the Crystal Visions Tarot by fantasy artist Jennifer Galasso, you are entering a different world -- a colorful one filled with crystals, fairies, animals and mystical figures. The artist was inspired by Stevie Nicks' latest CD "Crystal Visions" as well as her interest in crystal balls.

I was enchanted with the vibrant images right away. The artist's color choices are bold and bright yet still ethereal. Purples, scarlet reds, deep indigos and lush greens make this deck a visual feast for the eyes. While the art is fantasy based, it manages to steer away from being too cheesy. Although some of the figures were a bit cartoonish, overall the look is whimsical, romantic and mythical. Based on the standard Rider Waite Smith system, this deck stays almost true to the tradition -- there is an additional card in the deck, giving you 79 cards rather than 78. This extra card is called "The Unknown Card" and when it lands in a reading, it represents something that is "not yet meant to be revealed". The usual Majors are featured and the suits are traditional Cups, Wands, Swords and Pentacles. Court cards are Kings, Queens, Knights and Pages.

Different flowers and animals represent each suit:
Cups: emotions -- water lilies and dragon flies
Swords: intellect and conflict -- ravens and winged creatures
Pentacles: material things and money -- crystals, fruitful trees, wildlife
Wands: creativity -- candles, sprites, dragons

While I enjoyed the art in the Minors, the Majors are the standout part of this deck. My favorites were the Hierophant with the pope sitting on a throne in front of a stained glass window adorned with different religious symbols; the eerie Death card with a ghostly figure standing above a seemingly dead female on a headstone; the mighty Emperor with his ram's mask and The Devil with a playful Pan like figure in the background trying to entice a naked woman who lounging by a tree with an apple in her hand (who is tempting who?) I would recommend this deck to any tarot collector, any fans of fantasy art, younger readers or beginners, as well as anyone who enjoys crystals and faeries. There are no really creepy images, making this deck appropriate for everyone. Two Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady


If you like fantasy art, (and who doesn't?) this deck is a must have for all Tarot deck collectors and readers. It's beautifully illustrated, full of symbology, and evocative. Based on the traditional structure of the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) system of a 78 card deck, you will find the familiar names of the Major Arcana, the Court, and the suits: Wands, Cups, Pentacles, Swords. Included is an added bonus, The Unknown Card. The images are clear in their detail and of sufficient size to see them clearly, and surrounded by a narrow white border. The backs are reversible with a large opalescent sphere in the center which is surrounded by a filigree of rose vines and gems. A pentacle rests in each corner, while a chalice sits in the center at top and bottom.

This beautiful deck would be appropriate for beginners to more advanced readers. I believe I will be spending many delighted hours now and in the future, working with this deck. I’m sure clients will find it as pleasing, if not more so, as I do. If you happen to be on the fence about purchasing this deck, I would recommend it for either yourself or as a gift. It's a win-win!

-- Koneta Bailey, New Paths Tarot


Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to the classic Rider-Waite 78-card system in much of its symbolism, as well as in card and suit names. The luscious card imagery also illustrates the elemental aspects of each suit in order to aid the novice in forming associations with the cards. The Crystal Visions Tarot deck includes 78 cards with an additional unknown card for gazing into future situations that have not yet been revealed, or for exploring issues with deeper insight. The instruction booklet offers both upright and reversed meanings.

The LWB provides an Introduction to the deck along with descriptions and divinatory meanings for each card, including meanings for reversed cards. I am impressed with the amount and value of the material in this LWB. We are given the usual DMs but we are also given insight into the reasoning behind the depiction of the characters on the cards. For example, the description of The World includes: "The characters depicted in this card sits on top of the world in the lotus pose. She appears to be meditating, listening to the hum of the universe. She wears a necklace with the Hindu symbol 'Om' symbolizing the most perfect integration of mind, body and spirit."

The colors on these cards are soft yet vivid. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel. The characters primarily consist of broad-shouldered, well-proportioned men and beautiful, slender women with long, flowing hair. These ethereal images are pleasing to the eye in both color and style. Each suit has its own consistent color scheme, inspired by the element associated with that suit. The Cups cards feature violet and magenta backgrounds; the card titles are black on a pinky lavender bar. Swords cards are indigo and lavender, with the titles written on a lavender-blue bar. Pentacles cards are shades of green and brown, with the titles written on a pale olive-green bar. Wands cards are orange-red and maroon, with the titles written on what I would call a rosy beige bar. The artist's "cool" and "warm" palettes make it easy to recognize the elemental associations in any given spread.

The symbolism on the cards also ties in nicely with elemental associations. For example, the moon appears in in various phases on all of the Cups (Water) cards. Lions and dragons appear on many of the Wands (Fire) cards. Birds or butterflies appear on most of the Swords (Air) cards. Trees and plants dominate the scenes on the Pentacles (Earth) cards.

This deck is likely to appeal to readers who prefer traditional RWS titles and symbolism, but also like to work with cards that feature romantic, fantasy-style art suggestive of the Faerie realm. The level of detail in the images encourages closer study of the cards, yet is not overwhelming. Although the characters are not people you are likely to see in your everyday life, many of them are approachable and engaging. The Unknown Card may not appeal to everyone, but you don't have to use it if you don't like it. I recommend meditating on The Unknown Card before shuffling and drawing cards from this deck for the reading.

-- Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


When I saw images of the Crystal Visions Tarot deck online, I thought it was very pretty, but I just didn't realize how beautiful these cards actually were until I bought them and held them in my hands. For many decks, sample images don't truly do a deck justice, and this one is no exception. Having these cards in my hands to shuffle and read with on an up-close-and-personal basis allowed me to quickly connect -- and to classify this deck among my favorites!

I love the feminine feel of this deck. The imagery is beautiful with rich tones that speak to me on an emotional level. And for those who prefer the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) style of Tarot, the symbolism of the Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to tradition -- from the titles and ordering of the Major Arcana Cards (with Strength as #8 and Justice as #11) ... to the suit names: Cups, Swords, Pentacles, and Wands ... to the traditional court card names: Page, Knight, Queen, and King. while the deck is beautiful to look at, it also renders such beautiful and meaningful energy in reading the cards. As mentioned, this deck really speaks to me on an emotional level. In fact, I quickly made friends with the Crystal Visions Tarot. Doing my first reading with this deck of cards was like connecting with a dear and trusted friend -- even though the cards and I just met during the first week of January 2012. What a lovely way to start my new year in the world of Tarot!

If you are familiar with a RWS deck, you can read the Crystal Visions Tarot straight out of the box with the understanding that there is that extra card in this deck. But for those who are new to the Tarot, I like the way the author and artist has written the 63-page accompanying booklet. It's far better than most LWB's available for a deck. I feel that even a beginner to Tarot could successfully learn Tarot with this deck and the proper books for learning this subject.

A fascinating thing I noticed in this deck is that for the cards that can signify change or rebirth on some level, there are butterflies as part of the symbolism for those cards. In the description of the High Priestess card above, the author tells us that butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and eternal life. I definitely agree, and I would add to that description that butterflies are a symbol of change. Butterflies can show us a "lighter" side of a situation, or can show how thought transforms or changes one's understanding of life and circumstances.

This is a deck that I plan to use frequently since it feels as comfortable to me as the RWS traditional tarot deck, and thus I appreciate the fact that a quality cardstock has been used for this deck. The quality cardstock will allow the Crystal Visions Tarot to stand the test of time with heavy usage.

While I noted that this deck has a feminine feel to me, there are still plenty of male characters contained within the cards. A third of the deck does feature men in the imagery. So it's not a gender biased deck. It just has a soft, gentle, nurturing, and feminine feeling for me. Of course, I don't want to leave you with the impression that this deck is filled with fluff and can't tell it like it is. It definitely can tell the tale of a difficult and challenging story in your life, but at the same time, it's like having a friend by your side who will offer comfort, support, and guidance to get through whatever you're going through. This is the kind of gentle strength that offers empowerment.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone who enjoys the RWS tarot decks, to those who want a gentle deck that has a softer approach (yet still powerful!), and even for those who are just starting with the Tarot. The Crystal Visions Tarot follows RWS tradition in a way that doesn't clone or copy the familiar and well-loved kind of traditional tarot deck, but is still similar enough to immediately resonate with. Collectors will also want to get a copy of this deck, too.

-- Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


To call a tarot deck "different" is definitely vague. The Crystal Visions Tarot is different from many tarot decks I have come across. The cards reflect Galasso’s fantasy style, so those who enjoy fantasy-themed decks will surely like this one. Most of the characters on the cards are women, which is a change from many more traditional tarot decks. Similar to the back, the cards are colored in mostly soft pinks and purples. Each card has a colored rectangle at the bottom with the name of the card, and the background color changes depending on the suit of the card, which is great for the reader. The card backs are simple yet complex, with pentacles in each corner and a circle in the center adorned with flowers. A chalice adorns the center of the long ends of the card. The entire back color is muted and soft, pleasing to the eye and drawing you in. The cards are shiny but not slippery. From an imagery perspective, the deck has some similarities to standard RWS symbols, but it is far from a clone. The Fool in this deck walks off a cliff, but instead of a dog she is accompanied by a number of butterflies.

Galasso's attention to detail is impressive -- the Ace of Cups is one of the most beautiful cards I have ever seen in a tarot deck. One interesting fact is the many of the cards have some kind of reference to air -- a dragonfly, fairy, butterfly, or other winged creature -- which is something you don't often see in tarot decks. I especially liked the Death card, which has Death holding a staff topped with an ankh and the inscription VITA MUTATUR NON TOLLITUR (Life is changed, not taken away) on a tomb. Butterflies reinforce the overall transformation feel of the card. It softened the card but rendered it neither foolish nor powerless, which is a fine line to walk.

This deck also features an additional card, bringing the total number of cards to 79. "The Unknown Card" is explained as an area of the reading which requires further examination -- like a past event, for example -- or that additional steps need to be taken to clarify the bigger picture. I'm not a big fan of extra cards in tarot decks, especially with vague descriptions, so likely I'd use the deck without this one.

While I'm not a fan of reading with fantasy decks generally speaking, I intend to give this one a try. I think my clients will like it, and I know I'll enjoy reading with it, especially when I need a change from RWS clone decks and I'd like something soft yet powerful.

-- John Marani, in ATA Quarterly Journal


The first thing to note about this deck is the beautiful use of color in each card. A major strength of this deck is its ability to create a mood or feeling with each card by such masterful use of color. In the author's own words, the cards have a "vibrant and consistent color scheme, in order to be easily recognizable within a spread."

The artist has consistently portrayed each suit experience through specific colors, crystals, people and other beings. She also assigns elements to each of the four suits in the LWB. The world and its artwork are largely influenced by her work as a fantasy artist and illustrator.

Coins -- the scenes take place in and around tress, lots of greens and yellows, crystals and earth spirits.

Cups -- all scenes take place in same locale and include water lilies, dragonflies, the moon in its different phases, pinks and reddish purples.

Wands -- features lions, unicorns, horses, mountainous terrain and lots of red.

Swords -- the scenes are bleak, cold and snowy with nurds and other winged characters.

One particularly striking card for me is the 4 of Swords. A woman lies at rest on her back in snow that almost covers her, and her arms are crossed as if keeping her only slightly warm. Swords, roses and petals are strewn on the snow around her, and the whole scene is viewed from directly above her. While her face is expressionless, the image itself is felt at first glance. In readings I have found that the characters' faces and eyes do not communicate nearly so much as do the gestalt of colors, symbols and flow of details in each card image. Messages with this deck seem to be toned down in an almost introverted style for a nice and gentle read, much like getting advice from a dreamy friend who, even in anger or elation, remains subdued and calm.

-- John Alan, on Tarot Guild


I love the colors and sense of grace in this deck. The intention with this deck was to create art that was unique, but that would be close enough to traditional imagery to allow new readers to learn the Tarot easily. This is a traditional 78 card deck with one additional card in the Major Arcana, entitled the Unknown Card. It represents an answer that is not yet ready to be revealed. I love decks with an extra card like this”! The Unknown Card can refer to something from the past, or something that is going to happen in the future. The area that this card falls in indicates where steps need to be taken to clarify the big picture. There is also a hint to move forward with an open mind, leaving all bias behind. I loved this card before I even knew what it represented -- my thought was "Yes! Another deck with a card that is 'gifted'!" What an incredible card, with the female figure holding a crystal ball in her left hand. In front of her we see the shadow of an owl. Her whole body posture invites the Seeker to peer into the crystal ball! The artwork is done in a fantasy style, using reds, greens, lavender, and dark brown predominately. There is a sense of gentleness and "otherworldliness" that draws one in, and makes one feel right at home.

This is one deck that if I had my way, I would talk about each and every card! However, that is not allowed, so we will look at the cards that pulled me in the strongest. One of my birth cards is the Hermit, so that is one card that I look at in every deck. If there was a make or break card for me, this would be it. Here we see a lone figure, in a lavender robe, sitting atop a mountain, with a lamp in their left hand. They face the right hand side of the card, generally considered to represent the future. To me, they appear very wistful. The Empress stands in the middle of a garden, wearing a bright red dress, and carrying a triskele scepter in her right hand. She holds a heart-shaped charm. Lush greenery is behind her, as well as a tree with bright green foliage and ripe red fruit. In the upper right hand corner of the card we see beautiful butterflies.

The Lovers shows a man and a woman embracing, with flowers in the right and left hand lower corners. The figures are bound by ties held by two doves.

The Ten of Swords in this deck is one of the least scary, but saddest, images of this card that I have seen in any deck. A female figure is face down in the snow, bloody, with ten swords in her back. She is surrounded by snow and barren trees. The clouds in the sky behind her are attempting to part, indicating that there is hope.

The Eight of Pentacles shows a female figure, standing at her spinning wheel, paying ardent attention to her work. I like this card because she is working outside, with greenery surrounding her and a tree behind her.

The Fool in this deck just carries incredible energy! The figure is a female, with dark, flowing hair. She stands on a precipice, one foot on land and one in the air. There is a trail of butterflies in the air to her right.

I found this deck very easy to read with, and feel that it would be a great deck to offer clients as a choice for their readings. The art alone is gorgeous, and the additional card (the Unknown Card) opens up new avenues for reading. It could simply be taken out of the deck if the reader preferred not to use it.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I felt compelled to look through the cards a second time, and a third. Each time I did, I saw something I hadn't noticed before. There are figures of people in the twisted tree branches, and delicate angels in the clouds. The lush flowers and trees have lovely texture, as do the brilliantly colored dragons. The skies and landscapes are evocative. When I looked closely at each card, I realized this isn't a trite deck. I felt like an old woman who has mistakenly assumed a young, pretty girl to be shallow and stupid. Crystal Visions Tarot is true to Rider Waite Smith structure and interpretation. In many cards, the subtle symbolism honors a wealth of tarot tradition, often in clever ways.

It would take a long time to describe all the cards I love in this deck. They include the Fool, who is female. Butterflies, appropriate for the air correspondence of this card, also surround her. Her dress has red ribbons, one of which has casually wrapped around her leg, giving her the ancient tradition of the Fool's red-striped legs. In the World card we see a large lotus flower cradling a globe on which sits a woman in lotus position. More butterflies here, not elementally appropriate, but acceptable, because they are flying out of her palm chakras. As I mentioned earlier, I question the addition of a seventy-ninth card, entitled The Unknown Card. This card says that the answer is, at present, unknowable. Perhaps we need to look within and find the answer in our own heart. The card is actually quite lovely. It shows a modern Goth-looking young Pagan woman holding a crystal ball. The image is rather different from the rest of the deck. It stands out as a special card, belonging to none of the suits. It is a legitimate tradition in random token divination to use a blank token. It makes sense for Galasso to offer us this option.

That I have already started using Crystal Visions Tarot for professional readings is the highest praise I could give any tarot deck. However, I was initially unsure if I wanted to use the Unknown Card, or use my prerogative to remove it. So far, I have left it in the deck. I must admit, it pops up at very appropriate times.

It has been a while since I've discovered a new deck to add to my short list of professional reading decks. Crystal Visions Tarot is attractive, evocative and easy to understand. Unlike many fantasy art tarot decks, its images are uncomplicated and traditional. Do not be fooled by its youthful energy, Crystal Visions Tarot will give great wisdom and depth. It will be a solid learning and reading deck for anyone from beginners to seasoned professionals.

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


Fantasy artist Galasso has transformed classic tarot imagery into a vibrant tour, through a crystal ball, into a magical world filled with fairies, fantastical creatures, and exotic flowers. Color creates the backdrop against which the story of each card is told. Lyrical and mysterious, the illustrations almost sing.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
The Spirit of Herbs
The Spirit of Herbs

What customers are saying about The Spirit of Herbs:

This book is wonderful, and I don't say that lightly. As an herbalist I found it helpful on many levels. With each card there is a corresponding herb and description that deals with the physical and spiritual health aspects of the card. There are ways to use the herbs as talismans or how to make them for consumption. My clients and I have always found the readings relevant and "right on".

—K.P. Wolf, Amazon customer


Great book for anyone interested in the Tarot and Herbal medicine. Michael Tierra covers not only the tarot card, with its beautiful imagery, but he also gives you in-depth info on the herb represented by that card. It is difficult to get this book, so if you can find it, grab it.

—P. Pitchford, Amazon customer


I have been using this book and the deck that goes with it for several years. It is a good reference companion to the deck and I always gain new insights into the cards and the plants each time I return to the book.

— Michelle, on Goodreads

$9.95
Pixie’s Astounding Lenormand
Pixie’s Astounding Lenormand
WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT PIXIE'S LENORMAND
 
Comprised of illustrations from the Rider-Waite tarot and “The Green Sheaf”, this 36-card petit Lenormand pays homage to Pamela Colman Smith. It is fundamentally a series of collages pieced together from Smith’s artwork. The pieces of the Rider-Waite cards add layers of meaning to the simple Lenormand images.

On the surface it’s a series of images which trigger intuitive information in the reader. For those who are familiar with Smith’s work, each card is a little mystery to be solved and built upon.

Fun, thought-provoking, and already a sensation on the web, this small deck in its metal container is a treat for beginners and seasoned diviners alike.
—Anna, Tarotwise.com

My go to tarot deck has always been The Rider Waite Smith. When I first got into Lenormand ,I paid a high price on Ebay for Edmund Zebrowskis self published Pixies Astounding Lenormand. I didn't use it much because it cost so much. When I heard US Games published it, I had to have it. The artwork is taken from The Rider tarot and The Golden Vanity. The LWB is great. It's actually a bit more than most would call a LWB. It explains each card, it's energy and where in her artwork it was taken from. It's great for beginners and experienced Readers. Now I can put the self published one up just to look at. Also it comes in a little metal box, which I love.
—Dawn Donivan, Amazon customer

Pamela Coleman Smith affectionately known as Pixie is without doubt the most influential illustrator of tarot decks. Ever. Her idiosyncratic illustrations of the Minor Arcana in the Rider-Waite-Smith deck (as it is now commonly referred to) single-handedly revolutionized the tarot, and ushered in the age of the fully illustrated 78 card deck. During her lifetime Pixie did not illustrate any other divination decks beside the Rider-Waite-Smith; Lenormand was not, at the time, particularly popular nor was it (or is it) considered to be the repository of esoteric, occult, and magical knowledge that tarot is. Currently interest in Lenormand and other non-tarot divination decks is on the rise. Edmond Zebrowski has taken elements from the Rider-Waite-smith deck as well as other illustrations by Pamela Coleman Smith and fused them into a charming Lenormand deck. 
 
Pixie's Astounding Lenormand is a standard 36 card deck with no extras. It comes packaged in a small metal tin, with liftoff lid, painted with scenes from the deck, roses, and publisher information. The deck is accompanied by a small 129-page guidebook. Being a product of U.S. Games Systems the quality of the cards is virtually guaranteed. The cards are quite small, 57 x 89mm, as befitting traditional Lenormand decks, and very easy to handle. The card stock is excellent – firm and quite flexible, but not flimsy. The finish is low sheen and smooth with out being slippery – the cards do not stick together or clump, but have an easy flow when shuffled. 
The print quality is excellent – the images are clearly defined with crisp, clean lines and true colours. The palette is a direct reflection of PCS’s original colour scheme which is restrained and elegant – pale blues and greens, powdery teal, buttery yellow, sandy tan, burgundy, blood red, and faded slate predominate. 
 
The illustrations themselves are faithful reproductions of Pamela Coleman Smith’s lovely, old-fashioned images... Edmond Zebrowski has taken many of the minor players and mis-en-scene from the RWS deck and re-focused our attention on them by placing them as central images. Not only has the artist successfully pastiched or collaged elements of Pixie’s illustrations but the tiniest details such as her chiaroscuro techniques have been retained. The print on the back of the deck, a single rose on a blue background, is not reversible. 
 
The guidebook although small is full of information that is helpful to both the novice and experienced user. The Introduction explains the origins of the deck, as well as a few tips on how to read the cards. Each card is given 8 points of information: 
Card Energy – whether the card is positive, negative, or neutral.
Keywords – fundamental descriptors of the card’s characteristics.
Full Meaning – a detailed explanation of the card’s divinatory meaning.
Love – an interpretation for a 'Love 'reading.
Career – and interpretation for a 'Career 'reading.
Characteristics/Qualities – how a card may describe a person in a reading.
Timing – when something will occur.
Image Origins – explains the sources of the images, how they were adapted from PCS's original works. 
 
If you are a fan of Pamela Coleman Smith or the Rider Waite Smith deck then this Lenormand is a must have. It is a beautiful deck for both novice and adept alike… And would be especially helpful for a novice Lenormand user who has experience reading the RWS tarot. This is a fabulous homage to Pamela Coleman Smith and an absolutely delightful Lenormand deck.
— MedusaWink, Aeclectic Tarot
$18.95
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE WONDERLAND TAROT

The collaborative team of Christopher and Morgana Abbey beautifully adapted the style and flavor of Sir John Tenniel's illustrations of Lewis Carroll's work to fit the typical Rider-Waite-Smith (RWS) system. The Major and Minor Arcanas are fully illustrated, facilitating the work of a reader who is familiar with the RWS symbolism. Of course, the replacement of the suits occasionally gives the reader pause (The Swords, Staves, Cups, and Pentacles are now Flamingos, Peppermills, Hats, and Oysters, respectively), but once the reader accommodates to that alteration, this deck is found to be quite easy to work with. The color and style of these cards provide a somewhat Victorianesque feel that may be quite appealing to many readers. One of the considerable benefits of this deck, however, is that the cards themselves are the approximate size of a standard playing deck. Readers who permit the querant to shuffle the cards may appreciate this, as many non-readers (indeed, as well as some readers!) have a difficult time shuffling the slightly larger sized cards that are characteristic of most Tarot decks. Individuals with more mundane plans for this deck are additionally fortunate in that the playing-card equivalent of the Minor Arcana is notated in the borders of each of the appropriate cards (e.g., the “Five of Spades” is noted in the border of the Five of Flamingos). Although best suited for someone who already possesses a bit of Tarot acumen, the little white book (LWB) included with the deck should be particularly helpful to those not already acquainted with Alice and her adventures. Each card is well described in terms of its depiction of characters and suggested divinatory meanings. In sum, the Wonderland Tarot is a surprisingly pleasant deck that provides a whimsical atmosphere, familiar symbolism, and convenience in handling. This is a marvelous combination for any Tarot deck.
—Tom LeBlanc, Aeclectic Tarot


One of the most noticeable things about this deck is that the traditional suits have been changed: swords = flamingos; rods = peppermills; cups = hats; and pentacles = oysters. The suits are also marked with the corresponding symbols from ordinary playing decks: hearts, diamonds, spades, and clubs. The artwork is based on that in Lewis Carroll's Wonderland books. All of the characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass appear, including the Walrus and the Carpenter, the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, Bill the Lizard, the Mock Turtle, and the Cheshire Cat. Lewis Carroll appears as the Magician. Of course Alice appears repeatedly throughout the deck.



The illustrations are well done and capture the spirit of the books, with story elements well matched to cards' meanings. The deck feels good to hold, in part because they are close to the size of a standard playing deck. Also, the cards are of sturdy high quality, and have a strong, positive metaphysical feeling. 
This is a very unique and original deck. I would suggest it to anyone who collects tarot or is a Wonderland fan.
—Amazon customer

$18.95