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Renaissance Tarot Book
Renaissance Tarot Book

What customers are saying about A Renaissance Tarot Book

A "companion book" + an indispensible tarot history resource

This book was published to accompany the author's "Renaissance Tarot" deck. But whereas most companion books confine themselves to the deck they are sold with, perhaps folding in generic tarot-reading instructions, this book explores the origins and symbolism of the tarot with such depth that it is an important stand-alone tarot book.

Moving beyond recycled speculation about gypsies, Egyptian mystery cults, and other such exotica, this book goes directly to the source: the culture of Renaissance Italy, which produced the first tarot decks. Williams does not attempt to deliver the definitive "truth" about what the original tarot designers may have had in mind, but he does collect an extraordinary array of "tarot parallels" in art, literature, philosophy, mythology, and folk culture. What emerges is a picture of the enduring archetypal nature of the each of the tarot symbols. Williams shows how deeply embedded these images are in our culture, and how ubiquitous and familiar they were to people in 15th century Europe.

The text is supported by hundreds of attractive line drawings, made by the author to illustrate the historic works of art referenced in the text. The book thus becomes a guided tour back in time to the culture that produced the first tarot decks, imbued with the author's personal vision and yet faithful to the facts at every turn. There are few books available to give the student a trustworthy and useable account of the meaning of the tarot symbols in their original context. This is one of the best. Also included are brief descriptions of the cards in the Renaissance Tarot deck, along with divinatory meanings and some instruction on reading the cards. The book's greatest value, however, is in illustrating where the tarot comes from, and deepening and enriching the reader's understanding of the ancient symbols. Even if you don't use the Renaissance Tarot deck, this book will give you many wonderful insights about the tarot and bring you into a deeper relationship with the cards of your own deck. Highly recommended.

—Tom Waters, Amazon customer


The journey that is the Renaissance Tarot spanned a period of ten years - the results show the care, thought and nurturing that was taken every step of the way. Brian Williams had a life long interest in both classical and Renaissance art, which he has translated nicely into the Renaissance Tarot. After spending a year in studies at the University of Padua in Italy. Brian took the illustrations and theory that would become the Renaissance Tarot and used them as the basis for an independent thesis and project at the University of California at Berkeley.

One of the themes that run through this book and deck is the place that Tarot held in European culture. Brian's stated purpose with the accompanying book is to provide a complete guide to the cards, their meanings and their uses. He also goes into the historical significance of each of the cards, which is not something that I have seen done elsewhere. Each card, including the minors, has a bit of myth in it that explains the archetypal qualities of the card, For example, the Ten of Swords is the myth of Paris and Achilles, while the Chariot is the myth of Aphrodite and Ares.

Throughout the accompanying book there are a wealth of black and white illustrations from the Renaissance period. At one point we see the game of Tarot being played (as taken from a mid-fifteenth century fresco in the Sala dei Giochi in the Casa Borromeo in Milan. At another point we see a manuscript illumination of Mars (the God) from the fifteenth century. At yet another point we see an engraving of a Satyr family by Durer from 1505. The list is endless - and fascinating.

With each of the majors we are treated to a wonderful description of the card, quite an involved background into the archetypal myth, and incredible illustrations, as well as divinatory and reversed meanings. With the court cards and the minors we see a description of the card, an abbreviated version of the myth behind it, as well as divinatory and reversed meanings. Each section contains a black and white scan of the card.

At the end of the book Brian presents a section on Tarot spreads, including the Celtic Cross, Tetrasky (also known as the Pythagorean Tetrad) and the Twelve Houses spreads. An interesting aside on the Twelve Houses spread is that it is presented in a square format (referred to as a quadrilateral design), rather than the usual circular format.

The cards themselves are 2 3/4" by 5", on glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/4" white border, with a bisque colored center containing intricate work using triple circles resembling Celtic Knots, upon which reside the medieval symbols for the elements in the four corners, with four corresponding animals floating within them. A male and female figure recline in the center, with their hands held. The almost blandness of the backs acts as a kind of foil for the wonderfully rich colors of the card faces. Again we see the use of a 1/4" white border, followed by a 1/4" gold inner border. The top two corners of each of the cards contain figures (some animal, some human, some symbols) that are there for ornamental purposes only. The title for each card is across the bottom, in both Italian and English.

The overall coloring is a well-done pastel, with the figures dressed, for the most part, in Renaissance fashion. The pips make basic use of the suit symbol, with animal and human figures added to them that are not integral to the understanding of the cards. Each suit has its own color: yellow for Swords, pink for Cups, green for Pentacles and blue for Staves.

There are two small changes in the titling of the Major Arcana: the Wheel of Fortune becomes Chance and Judgment becomes the Angel. Each time I return to this deck I find something new to intrigue me. The accompanying book has lessons of its own to give. I highly recommend this deck to all students at all levels of study.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$17.95
Star-Spider Speaks Book
Star-Spider Speaks Book

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE STAR-SPIDER SPEAKS BOOK:

An absolute MUST for use with the Native American Tarot Deck

Anyone who enjoyed the Native American Tarot Deck must have this book. It completely explains both the meaning and the history behind each card, plus it provides insightful meditation points to strengthen your knowledge of this powerful, unusual deck.

-- L. Fletcher, Amazon customer


If you own the deck, you need to own this book!

This is the companion book to the Native American Tarot Deck. Though the small booklet included with the deck will get you started, this book will give you even more details and interpretations, not only of the cards but also of Native American teachings and beliefs. It also includes handy reference pages for comparing the Major Arcana symbolism across many beliefs & cultures and various card spreads to use for meditation.

-- Sam, Amazon customer

$9.95
Tarot of a Moon Garden
Tarot of a Moon Garden

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF A MOON GARDEN:

At first, I wasn't sure I was going to like this deck, but it seemed to just kind of "grow" on me as I began to use it more in Tarot readings -- and clients requested this deck a lot for readings. It's actually a very delightful and charming deck of tarot cards. Each of the cards depicts a night scene, with the exception of the Sun Card, which shows a bright and glorious sunny morning. Some readers dislike this deck because they feel that it's too "cute," however, I think of it more as being a "magical fairyland" type of deck. It is a fun and enchanting deck to read with, once you become accustomed to it. There are no frightening images in this deck, so it's a good choice for the beginning young reader or anyone else that either wants to read the cards or get a reading but is hesitant about the traditional images of most decks. Tarot of a Moon Garden reduces any "harshness" that may be found in some decks.

You'll find delightful images such as flowers, castles, fairies, dolphins, and hot air balloons. Artist Marie Sweikhardt works with the idea that the moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, lush jungles, mysterious caverns, and exotic flowers -- like a lunar Garden of Eden.

It is a soft and gentle deck that follows the Rider-Waite tradition and symbolism but in a much calmer way. It's a deck suitable for reading for or about children as well. Although not the deck for everyone, it's certainly a welcome change for a few moments of escape into an enchanted land of childhood magic. When the mood is whimsical, this can be a very nice deck to turn to. In August 2007, Tarot of Moon Garden was reintroduced and is once again available. So if you missed it during a time of being out-of-print, it's available again.

-- Velvet Angel, on Tarot Wisdom Readings


This imaginative deck weaves traditional images with mythic expression and elemental magic into a 78-card deck full of inspiration and insight. Beautifully illustrated by Karen Marie Sweikhardt this whimsical, full-color deck depicts an enchanted garden with exotic flowers, castles, and hot air balloons. The first thing that grabbed my attention was the colors and dreamlike images and it was a real pleasure to work with. The card stock is terrific and shuffles very easily and the image on the backs are not only reversible but intricate and pleasing to the eye.

The Major Arcana are stunning to look, at depicting fairies, dragons, butterflies and unicorns and even the moon herself makes an appearance in several of the cards. The Minor Arcana have dragonflies for the hilts of the Swords suit, mystical trees in the Staffs suit, there are butterflies, ferns and other foliage in the Cups suit and the Pentacles suit with it's large pentacle orbs floating across it's images. This deck is a delight to look at and definitely a joy to work with and makes a terrific deck for both beginner and experienced alike.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic


The Tarot of a Moon Garden deck was my 8 year-old son's first deck, given to him on his 6th birthday. The cards have been described as very feminine and romantic but we find them, instead, very gentle and magical. It is the perfect first deck for any young witch or wizard or of course for those young at heart.

The cards are easy to read and are filled with beautiful images and great detail. From the moment they're taken out of the box they seem to exude a kind of soft, magical transcendence. For a young reader they're just the thing to open the mind and senses to the "elsewhere".

Reading these cards or having them read for you, transports you to a gentler, more magical time. Every card in the deck, major and minor Arcana alike, brings one closer to a more innocent yet mysterious way of being. Even the death and devil cards are done in such a way as to adhere to the old standards (which I much prefer) and yet convey the message in a gentle, non-frightening way.

One would be hard put to find a better deck for the up and coming spiritual generation. Indeed, my number one recommendation for a child's first set of tarot cards would have to be the Tarot of a Moon Garden.

-- Winter, on Aeclectic Tarot


The moon is an enchanted place with whimsical creatures, mysterious caverns, lush jungles and exotic flowers. Sweikhardt weaves the traditional tarot symbolism into her images of a lunar Garden of Eden where there are dragonflies, butterflies, dolphins, dragons and unicorns around every corner. The inspiration card states Welcome to a Realm Where Myth and Magic are the Reality.

Journey into the Moon Garden and reflect on the phases of the lunar energy. It is a very bright, bold, and colorful deck taking you to a time of magic as it weaves traditional tarot symbolism, mythic expression and elemental magic. A tapestry for you to discover. As Sweikhardt states she started this as a poem, Moon Garden, and from there it blossomed into this wonderful fanciful enchanted deck.

It will soon be, if it is not already, a collector’s item, one you will want for your own collection, or just to have. Great for using and reading children, or for children to explore the Tarot.

-- Sally, on Aeclectic Tarot


My friend bought me a deck of cards as a gift. The deck was The Tarot of the Moon Garden. Immediately I felt soothed by its images of dancing fairies, protective dragons and lush gardens. Every card stirred feelings of hope and dreams achieved, even the cards associated with negative portents such as the Tower or the Devil. This deck is still my favorite and the ideal first set for anyone wishing to explore the mysteries of the Tarot. I find them deeply emotional, describing how events affect the questioner emotionally rather than detailing events. I feel these cards empathize with the questioner, place a comforting hand on their shoulder or join in with the cheers when all is well. They are a positive, gentle deck, eager to find positive results from the most negative events, but not give you a false hope, a false sense of security, keen to show events you'll face, keen to reassure you of their support.

They can be mischievous, I've never found any other deck with such personality, prone to mood swings if they're not treated right giving absolutely nothing to read, deathly silent especially if you query their advice. The fantasy beings depicted sum up perfectly these cards, encouraging the reader to dig deeper into a world of plenty, always offering encouragement. This is a set everyone should read at least once; they bring a rare innocent, childlike quality to an art often daunting when first practiced.

-- Niki, on Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Radiant Rider-Waite® Tarot
Radiant Rider-Waite® Tarot

What customers are saying about Radiant Rider-Waite

The new Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot is the latest offering in a long line of historically accurate decks from Stuart R. Kaplan based upon the illustrations of Pamela Colman Smith. For this very pretty new deck, the artist Virginijus Poshkus was selected to re-color the drawings.

To describe the colouring of these cards as radiant is not an overstatement, as they are indeed shining and glowing, brilliant and luminous, and truly beaming with happiness. The cards have a clean, white border all around the images, with the numbers on the top in Roman numerals for the Major Arcana and spelled out in capital letters on the Minors. The titles and suits are in capital letters, in the same very pleasant typeface, also centered on the bottom of the cards.

The cards themselves have a nice feel, as they are printed on good cardstock, and are plastic-coated and durable. They are easy to handle and shuffle, being sized at 2 3/4" by 4 3/4" overall. The packaging is in a standard size box, printed in complimentary hues of orange and blue to highlight the radiant color values of the cards within, and featuring the Fool and Magician cards from inside. The instructions are familiar, featuring an introduction by Stuart R. Kaplan, and follow the standard format used for all decks from U.S. Games in the Rider-Waite tradition, which is both helpful and convenient for every purchaser of these cards. I was very pleased to be able to add the new Radiant Rider-Waite to my personal collection. Virginijus Poshkus has done an excellent job of radiantly re-coloring the images, which will make them easy to read and use for beginners and the advanced student, and they should soon prove to be a favorite of collectors worldwide.

—Peter Cowen, Aeclectic Tarot


Some people may feel that an "update" to a deck is unnecessary, that too many versions of the same thing amounts to overkill. I often find that new versions do have something to offer, and that this is the case with the Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot.

In the original version of this deck, there is an emphasis on the black outlining of the art, which to me takes away the ability to connect with the cards. The standard Rider-Waite was my first deck, and was almost immediately supplanted by the Morgan-Greer deck, a Rider-Waite clone that I could connect with much more easily.

The Radiant Rider-Waite, had it been my first deck, would have been the deck that I stayed with for professional readings. I like the fact that the intense black lines have been discarded, and the crisp white border with the card number at the top and the title at the bottom. The back of the cards, carrying the image of a starry sky, is also far preferable to the diamond pattern of the standard Rider-Waite deck.

The coloring is much more intense, with more of an orange overtone to the yellows. In some instances (the Fool, for example) there appears to be an aura of light around the figure(s) in the card. You really have to look for this, and I do not feel that it takes away from the ability to use this deck at all.

The Empress ends up with more of an orange sky behind her, but the plant life is distinctly green, rather than the yellowish tone carried by the standard deck. The deletion of the black lines does seem to have affected the facial expressions on the figures in the cards - bringing them out, making them more evident.

The rather gray background of the Hermit becomes an intense blue, which I feel adds rather than detracts from the card. The same holds for the intensifying of the color for the veil behind the figure of Justice. The sun over the mountain behind the figure of Temperance now holds the image of triple crown, which does seem to belong there. The Moon is another card that distinctly benefits from the increased intensity of the coloring of the sky.

The stained glass window behind the figure in the Four of Swords becomes much more of a point of focus, and the little salamander in front of the seated King of Wands has his fifteen seconds of fame.

I find the Radiant Tarot to be a deck well worth adding to my collection, as well as one to offer as a choice of decks for my clients.

— Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


This deck has a close resemblance to another Rider-Waite clone which was also recolorized -- The Universal Waite recolorized by Mary Hanson-Roberts.  The Radiant deck, however, features shades that are richer, deeper, and bolder than the softer pastel hues of the Universal Waite version.

I would recommend the Radiant Rider Tarot to anyone who wants to stay with traditional Tarot, but who finds the colors of the traditional Rider-Waite to be too bland or boring for their personal taste.  Many have disliked the original Rider-Waite deck as being boring or uninspiring, while others don't mind at all.  But now there is another choice to help make tradition more fun, enjoyable, and inspiring.

The Radiant Rider takes the familiar and comforting images of the traditional Rider cards and brings them to life with "radiance."  The recolorization serves to illuminate Pamela Colman Smith's original work.  If you're not in the mood for the traditional Rider-Waite, which may seem too "plain," or you find that you're also not in the mood for the softer colors of the Universal Waite deck . . . then the bolder colors in the Radiant version may be just what you're looking for.

Just as with the Universal version of these traditional cards, this deck presents itself in a whole new light . . . and so, if you've been one to stay away from the traditional Rider-Waite deck due to the coloring used, the Radiant Rider is a good reason to take another look from a fresh perspective.

I know I personally enjoy working with traditional Tarot, even though I also find it fun to venture out with something new quite often.  But the traditional Rider Waite

is how it all started for me . . . and with the Radiant deck now available, it's among my favorites and is favored by many of my clientele in the professional readings I do.

It's just a bright, more colorful . . . and more illuminating experience to read with this traditional deck, which has been updated for modern times.

—Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings

$21.95
African Tarot
African Tarot

What customers are saying about African Tarot 

 
This could very well be the single cutest tarot deck in existence.
The title "African Tarot" is probably quite offputting to many people: are the art and descriptions specifically meant for Black people? Not at all. I am a black woman in Washington state and have showed this deck to countless white friends who have found it adorable. Its booklet displays meanings that seem pretty much standard to Rider-Waite system. Indeed, I've seen this deck defined as a "Rider-Waite clone".
 
The suits are also traditional: Wands, Swords, Cups and Pentacles. However, in the artwork the Swords are depicted as spears, the Cups as gourds and the Pentacles as golden discs. It is a very colorful (mainly primary colors, even), happy little deck, even though the people rarely give more than a vague Mona Lisa-type smile, if that. They have dark skin and dredlocks, but that's about where any cultural departure ends.
 
The artwork, however, was the clincher for me. There are a lot of "whimsical" decks out there with "childlike" art, but so help me, the art on the African Tarot is something I'd be *proud* to display on my 'fridge. It's childlike, but also of good quality and seems very secure in itself, a rarity in many homegrown "whimsical" decks.
The cards are approximately 3" x 2.5" and covered with what I assume is a standard, slick coating. This makes them easy to shuffle, but I have a habit of dropping some cards if I'm just going through them while holding them in my hands. The design on the back is as charming as each individual card design -- two spotted tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see either of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers the tortoise a symbol of "the slow coming of justice". Appropriate, no?
 
The deck comes in a brown, corregated cardboard container, which, after a few years of ownership, still seems quite sturdy. Both sides of the box are decorated with the same cardstock as the deck, with hints of the art style and relevant information printed on them. It gives the box a very environmental feel that goes with the deck very well.
The authors have subtitled the deck "Journey Into the Self." It is meant to be a lighter deck, and a loved deck. For me, it is. Very much loved, in fact. However, don't let the "lighter" aspect fool you. One of the spookiest tarot experiences I've ever had, involving a lost -- and later recovered -- card and some odd correspondences, happened involving this deck. It's not a *fluff* tarot. I would consider it more of a powerful specialty deck.
 
—Ashe Monday, Aeclectic Tarot 

I have previously used the Rider-Waite deck and found it to be rather "stuffy" for my tastes. I purchased the African Tarot deck at the recommendation of others and love it. I have already used it several times - it has wonderful pictures and I get a great feel from the images and explanations on the cards. You will not be disappointed!
 
—“Book Fiend”, Amazon Customer

This has got to be the cutest deck ever! It is a Rider-Waite variation and has been created mainly for beginners. Colorful, light-hearted and whimsical, this deck is really small (2.5 - 3 inches) and looks like it has been drawn by children. There is no real traditional African art on these cards, but there is the flair of an African village in all scenes, and the faces of the people are black. If you like light-hearted and fun decks, this will probably become a favorite for you.
 
Katerina, U.K. Amazon customer

A lot of people may be put off by the idea of an "African Tarot Deck," thinking that it must involve voodoo, arcane tribal symbolism, or just be for black people. Well, I'm a black woman who has shown this deck to white friends -- this deck is completely accessible.
 
The "African Tarot: Journey into the Self" is a teeny little deck based on Rider-Waite symbology. It also looks like it was drawn by a child with talent -- the sort of art that you'd *want* to put on your fridge. The people are brown and have kinky hair, and they live in an African village -- after that, and a few liberties with the suit cards -- it's a standard deck.
 
The suits, by the way, are traditionally named. However, the art shows Swords as spears, Cups as gourds and Pentacles as coins or disks. The art is rich and perhaps a tad dark for some, perhaps it's best not to read this one in low light -- but then, it's far from a gothic deck. The back design is equally darling -- two colorful tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see one of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers this animal a symbol of "the slow coming of justice" -- appropraite enough considering its country of origin.
 
I even find the package a total keeper: a brown, corrugated cardboard box with descriptive cards glued to the back and front. A rubberband to keep the box closed and you could probably drop this deck into your backpack and only have the box take damage. However, the box is so cute, why would you want to?
 
The little booklet inside confirms the image that this is a feel-good deck -- many of the interpretations are positive or at least encouraging of growth. So, while this isn't an all-occasion deck, I certainly think it's worth a look!
 
—R. Byrd, Amazon custome
$18.95
The Goddess Oracle Deck/Book Set
The Goddess Oracle Deck/Book Set

 

What customers are saying about Goddess Oracle

Divination has never been as sensual. This is an absolutely gorgeous collection of Goddess deities ... carefully researched... stunning... uplifting... The illustrations are truly remarkable. It is important to note that these cards are designed to nurture the feminine in all of us, regardless of gender - the Goddess bolsters those aspects of everyone's totality that have been historically disregarded, for example, intuitive abilities, creativity, sensuality, and nurturing skills.

—The Bodhi Tree Book Review


This deck of divination cards is excellent for anyone who is interested in goddesses from different cultures, as well as Tarot enthusiasts, alternative religions, or just in pretty artwork. Hrana Janto, the artist who painted the deck, worked hard to make each goddess both representative of the traditional symbolism surrounding her religion, as well as the various ways women "are" in the world. We have round, full-bodied women, young, old (the Sheila Na Gig is amazing, for example), thin, black, white, and all shades in between. There are women in the deck who could be supermodels, and some who look like they've had (and are proud of having) a couple of children. And all are reverence with the "goddesses in every woman" theory of all bodies and beauties being wonderful. The deck opens itself up for a number of personalized types of readings for the person who is looking for answers. You can use multiple spreads or just one card.

I recommend this deck as highly as I can, and the new US Games version has more durable cards, and are smaller as well, which could work a lot better for smaller hands to shuffle. The fine research into goddess traditions done by Marashinsky is still relevant, and I think this deck & book would make a great Christmas present. In fact, that's how I received it, and it is a welcome member of my Tarot collection.

—Kimberly Wells, Amazon customer


I love pulling a single card to define the goddess energy for my day or ritual, or to choose a working path. As for the cards, they are really beautiful! Each shows a detailed image of a goddess, with realistic backgrounds and supporting characters in the form of animals, plants, symbols, colors, and other people. They also have a key word, as well as the name of the Goddess. I also love that they depict a real variety of women of all ages, from pre-teen to crone, all body types, and different racial types. I’d recommend this exquisite deck to anyone wishing to explore goddess energy in their life or in their readings. The artwork is realistic, beautiful, with a great variety of colors, and although there is some nudity, it is never gratuitous.

—Chloe McCracken, Aeclectic Tarot


Wow!! Such beautiful illustrations, I found my female clients (and myself) have really enjoyed their readings from this deck and have come away from it feeling positive and very inspired to get in touch with the divine goddess within!! Beautiful and powerful cards to work with.

Loudeano, New Zealand


I purchased this card deck quite some time ago. It was recommended to me, by a close friend and mentor, that I consider an oracle deck vs. tarot as a divination tool. An oracle deck seems to allow more room for your own interpretation and use of intuition. I am a psychic medium, currently starting my own business doing readings, and I strongly identify with this deck. The images are all feminine and gorgeous. I adore the artistic style and connect strongly with the fact that each image is of a Goddess from cultures around the world. My readings have been clear and this deck has helped to open me up to my intuition, and to trust what comes through. The book that comes with the package is informative for the beginner and gives information on each individual card/Goddess along with a poem that helps you understand the feeling/message behind the card. Very nice and highly recommended, even just for the artwork!

Bibliophilia Eclectica


I had an amazing reading done with this deck a year ago and finally bought it for myself. It's great! The artwork is beautiful and I find the cards really speak to me. The book is good for a quick overview of each goddess but there's so much symbolism in each card, you can let the images guide you on their own.

­—C. Palmieri, Amazon customer


A very lovely deck and book set. Many will be familiar with Hrana Janto's art -- it has often graced the covers of PanGaia or SageWoman, and she has had a number of calendars featuring her images. I enjoy Marashinsky's writing and her attitude about spirituality. This deck is wonderful for divination and ritual use.

—Audra, Goodreads


The Goddess Oracle Deck is beautiful art combined with well-written explanations for each card in the deck. What amazed me is the accuracy in which the cards and descriptions fit with each reading. It is an amazing deck and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in adding to their existing collection and especially for first time beginners. After much research me and my wife settled on this one and we weren't disappointed, gorgeous, well-written descriptions and accurate.  Kudos to the designer and originator of this exquisite deck!

—Thomas W. Moon, Amazon customer


I own a few tarot and oracle sets, and this is by far my favorite. The artwork is absolutely amazing and easy to connect to. I don't use my decks often, but I love to take this one out to just look at the images. Very strong goddesses, each and every one, and the small stories in the booklet inspired me to look up the history of the individual goddesses as well. The spreads suggested also work quite well.

—Trina, Goodreads

$31.95
Spirit of the Wheel Meditation Deck
Spirit of the Wheel Meditation Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT SPIRIT OF THE WHEEL MEDITATION DECK:

This deck has awesome artwork and three word reminders on each card concerning the meaning described in the little book that comes in the deck. My recommendation is to lay the cards out on the floor in a medicine wheel (chart Included) so you can see how each card correlates and is placed in the Medicine wheel. I also burned sage and walked in a circle around the wheel blessing it and giving it my own personal power. I am picky about the tools I use for ritual, prayer and guidance. These cards speak to me, about the circle of life and walking it.

-- Thunderhands


The moment I received Spirit of the Wheel I knew that I had made a wise choice. I was truly excited and elated when it arrived and I opened the package to discover a truly beautiful and powerful deck.

Being of Native American heritage and brought up on the Native traditional path by my Blackfeet grandmother, I can honestly say I was very skeptical at first. I have seen many pseudo-native oracles and decks of so called native teaching but this deck is genuine and accurate. It is very easy to understand and a very pleasing medium to work with. Having done tarot readings myself for many years and working with many many decks I can say I was impressed and delighted when I used this deck in a reading with a client for the first time.

-- Crowdancer


I am Odawa/Potawatomi and believe that Gitchi Manitou did not give all the wisdom to one group of people, so recently became acquainted with oracle cards. I wanted some that I could use to do readings for my family and others back on the rez. Spirit of the Wheel portrays clans, moons, and manitous in a reverent, respectful way. The cards invite questions as opposed to hammering out ideas. This is a good cultural match for us, as most NDNs know that we all have to find our own path, and seek our own vision.

The suggested layouts are unique and have a nice feel to them (the pipe and sacred circle are very good). The booklet has some powerful ideas to guide you, but the cards are so clear that you will interpret them spontaneously for whatever the situation is.

If you are looking for Native oracle cards that will not offend your ancestors, your family, or your own cultural sensibilities, try this deck. It is probably the one you are seeking.

-- Honor Girl

$25.95
Whimsical Tarot Deck
Whimsical Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Whimsical Tarot

The Whimsical Tarot is a lot of fun -- although I originally bought it for my children to use, I found myself drawn to some of the really clever imagery. Hanson-Roberts uses traditional fairy tale characters to portray the divinatory meanings of each card. The Major Arcana, in particular, are well chosen, as are the court cards. This is a great deck to use if you're teaching kids the Tarot, or if you just want to expand your own horizons a bit. The artwork is lovely, and the card associations are clearly thought out. Definitely worth buying, if you enjoy Tarot and classic children's stories!

—Patti Wigington, About.com


Drawn by Mary-Hanson Roberts, who also created the art for the Hanson-Roberts Tarot and the Universal Waite Tarot, the Whimsical Tarot is based on fairy tales and nursery rhymes and intended for children and the 'young at heart'.

But it is by no means limited to children. The fairytales are familiar to almost everyone, the simplicity and already associated meaning with the cards helping to make tarot more accessible to a beginner.

Some of the cards make me chuckle, others I find impressive because of the approachable rendering of normally disliked cards. The Devil card, for example, shows a pair of hands controlling a marionette, a puppet on strings. The Death card is Sleeping Beauty.

I adore the backs of the cards. A lilac flower is in a rectangular focus in the center of the card. Surrounded by a mauve border, then a thicker border of yellow Celtic knot work on a turquoise background, it is restful, appropriate for upright or reversed readings, and very pretty.

I highly recommend the Whimsical Tarot as a child's tarot deck; for people who read for children; or for sensitive souls who aren't keen on confronting images on their tarot cards. The Whimsical Tarot gets the message across without being dark, negative or scary.

I also think it is a good beginners deck, as the fairytales used on each card allow the tarot novice to hang the tarot concepts on a framework they are familiar with. Learning seventy-eight different tarot meanings and how to interpret the tarot symbols can very seem daunting, but the Whimsical Tarot's cards are cute and the scenes already familiar. Hanson-Roberts combined traditional fairytales and tarot make a beautifully presented, sweet, and thoroughly whimsical tarot deck.

—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


She sat down and flipped through the deck, her eyes lighting up as the realized that she recognized all the fairytales and stories within each card. She squealed with excitement when the 4 of Swords reminded her of the Princess and the Pea, and she jumped up and down in her seat happily as the Magician bought back the story of Puss in Boots. When she had finished looking through the deck, she handed it back to me, with a grin from ear to ear adorning her face: My Mother appeared to like the deck.

As can be seen from my Mother's reaction, the Whimsical Tarot is aimed at children and the young at heart. The cards are adorned with fairytales, nursery rhymes, and stories that we were told as children, and as such, there are many adults who can use this deck very effectively. The benefits of using fairytales and such to illustrate the meanings of the cards is that nearly everybody is familiar with most of them, and thus can understand the meaning in the card without having to look in any book. Fairytales bring back fond memories of childhood, and those nights on the sofa with your Granny, when she would make you hot chocolate and then read Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm to you until you were too sleepy to stay awake any longer. The attraction of a deck surrounded by, and based upon, these stories is understandable.

This deck is largely traditional: the names of the cards, the suits of the Minors, the ordering of the Majors, and the meanings of the cards are all Rider-Waite traditional. The only thing that differs is the pictures used to illustrate the cards, as these are taken directly from the fairy stories applied to each card. All of the cards are fully illustrated with the gorgeous artwork of Mary Hanson-Roberts. The Court Cards are particularly appealing, all being characters from stories, with the Queen and King usually being from the same story, eg- King and Queen of Pentacles being Maid Marion and Robin Hood. The Pages in this deck are the most interesting I have come across, and certainly the easiest to understand! Instead of showing people, they show objects, which convey the meaning of the card. For instance, the Page of Swords shows a telescope, and the Page of Pentacles shows gold coins, scales, and a tally-chart. This is a great help, especially for young children and beginners, as it is often the Court Cards that are the most difficult to read.

All the fairytales are well chosen and very evocative. Every other deck I have seen which uses fairytales as its theme has failed in that sometimes the chosen fairytales are chosen superficially, for instance, in one deck I found that the Emperor card was represent by the Emperor's New Clothes, which really didn't have anything to do with the meaning at all. With this deck, that's not the case: Every single card's fairytale is chosen for its meaning and significance. That is an achievement within itself I think, and something that this deck deserves praise for.

I love this deck. It is the best one I have seen which is aimed at children, but which also proves to be an excellent deck for adults! Children, beginners, adults who enjoy fairy stories, collectors, and those who like Mary Hanson-Roberts' artwork would all enjoy this deck immensely and learn alot from it. For myself, after using this deck, I found that I could read better in general: the meanings of the cards took on a more imaginative form, and I could apply meanings from the cards to the querent's life very easily. As an introduction to the Tarot, or as a deck for the more advanced reader, this is an absolute treasure.

—Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot has a great richness to it because it is drawing on our knowledge of fairy tales as well as our knowledge of the Tarot. It works well for intuitive readings based on the images which can speak directly to us at a deep level. Although it may look like a children's deck it is suitable for anyone who is happy with an attractive, amusing deck which has more depth to it than appears at first glance. 


—Fairyhedgehog, Aeclectic Tarot


I have recommended this deck to everyone I know interested in Tarot and while at first they read reviews and see the deck and question me, once they USE the deck for the first time, they are hooked! As the author states in her introduction, the images are intended to appeal to our inner child, our earliest memories and our connections to fairy tales and their distinct sense of right and wrong, good and evil. These descriptions, again, seem simplistic and very black and white, and life deals us, like the Tarot, a mixed bag with gray areas, this deck comes through with clear messages and direction. Like our proverbial Knight in Shining Armor, the message in a spread heralds in with ease and in a manner that allow for deeper reflection as you view the images on the cards.

The artwork in this deck cannot be complimented enough. The images perfectly match the descriptions. Ms. Morrison, in her introduction, compliments Ms. Hanson-Roberts with seeing within her own mind and having an innate understanding of her ideas. This is true for this deck like no other I have encountered. There is a perfect congruity between image and word.

—Kate Robinson, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot approaches the reading of cards from a completely different aspect -- by associating with childhood images and fairy tales. This deck allows us to connect with our "inner child". Although the name may suggest this is a less than serious deck, this deck is a very valuable tool in discovering our inner selves and helping us reconnect with those simple things that give us joy.

The images on the cards do not obviously correspond with the imagery from our experiences with the Rider-Waite style of decks. Gone are the confusing "Quabalah mystery" symbolism that we pondered and studied in order to interpret the meanings of those older decks. This is the use of simple and obvious imagery that gives us instant insight into the meaning of the cards.

The images are drawn from well-known fairy tales and are familiar to just about anyone. The artwork of Mary Hanson-Robert is clean. She gives us very colorful images that attract attention but are not obtrusive. The artwork is not distracting, but is lovely to sit and reflect upon.

As we explore the deck, we find some familiar tarot references. We do have a Major Arcana comprised of 22 cards, all clearly marked with the number of the card in its order, and the name of the card. There is no mistaking the card's association. The Fool - 0 - is the scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz. If you look at the tarot as a personal journey of the one who begins as a fool, this association is very obvious. We have the symbolism of the yellow brick road, we have Toto and so much more. The Magician is Puss in Boots, the High Priestess is the Fairy Godmother. There are some very interesting associations, as with The Emperor being Father Christmas, the Old Woman in the Shoe for the Empress, Judgment using The Cricket from Pinnochio, Glinda for The World, "Goldilocks being discovered" as Justice. The images are so obvious in some instances, yet they challenge you to use your own judgment and personal insights.

I also find myself drawing on my own knowledge of the tarot and associations when I am using this deck. While someone who is not familiar with the traditional meanings of the tarot will find this a very easy and fun deck to use, those of us who are trained in the traditional meanings will not find this "foreign" as there are familiar associations here. When we look at the "Two of Cups", the traditional meaning being a lesser "Lovers" card, it's association is still retained with the story of the "Owl and the Kitty Cat", so we are not totally out of familiar grounds. Pentacles still retains its meaning of material matters while cups still reflects inner emotions. The "Ten of Swords", a card of chaos and mistakes, shows the story of Humpty Dumpty falling off the wall. The traditional meanings are not told in the mysterious symbolism but in very obvious and well thought through imagery.

The small details on the cards not only attract attention but allow special reflection and a good look at one's inner self. And these special touches make this a remarkable deck. I love this deck for personal contemplation. I have also used this deck for clients who wanted to examine their own personal feelings and issues and it has provided much insight. It works as well with clients as it does with personal readings.

I would also like to suggest that if you have a youngster who is interested in tarot cards and readings, that this would make a perfect first deck. As our children watch us using the cards, they will also want to explore the path with you, as all children look to their parents for guidance. This deck is so perfect for the younger apprentice that I couldn't think of any deck more perfect for the "almost teenager" or the "First Deck" gifting. If you are looking for something that is perfect for a holiday gift, or someone just starting, or the "first deck" give this deck a viewing and see if you don't agree this could be the deck for you.

—Margaret Foster, Amazon customer

$21.95
Wild Wisdom of the Faery Oracle
Wild Wisdom of the Faery Oracle

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT WILD WISDOM OF THE FAERY ORACLE

This isn't just a deck of oracle cards it is a book in its own right about the world of the fae. Lucy Cavendish is a beautiful writer and brings the world she sees and experiences to life for others. The artwork by Selena is nothing less than divine. Each card has an in-depth exploration for interpretation. The card spreads she recommends are also new and fun to use.

—Janelle, Goodreads


I love this Fairy deck, It has beautiful artwork and profoundly healing messages! It am soo happy with it! It really connects you with the healing power of the fairies!

—Andrea, Amazon customer


Just beginning to read about Faeries and their history. Somehow I was drawn to this Faery Oracle. When I received it I was intrigued and spell bound by the beautiful layout of the cards. I began reading the book and couldn't stop. The book is very detailed and the meanings/interpretation of the cards are very descriptive and very "ACCURATE". There are suggestions/rituals for you to connect with the Faeries but I was not willing to do that at the moment. I believe the rituals described only boost your connection with Faery but in my OPINION not necessary to get answers you are searching for. However, I did say a prayer and invited the Faeries into my life for guidance. After shuffling the cards a bit a card fell out of the deck. My quick reaction was to gather it and place it back in the deck. The card was "Little Boy Blue". Didn't know anything about the card just yet and why it popped out as it did. Anyway, I placed the card aside and continued to shuffle until I was ready to lay a spread. I used the suggested five-card spread. I honestly was freaked out with the cards that I picked for each position (which describes where you are in life). Every card was reversed and described EXACTLY my life details in terms of blockages, healing and so forth. The book offers reversal meanings and aren't necessarily negative. Just some things the Faeries believe you need to work on to better yourself. What really freaked me out because they were so "ACCURATE" I tested the cards by doing their suggested 3three-card spread, Past, Present, Future. I am thinking that while shuffling the first time I didn't notice whether or not if I had the cards upright or reversed. In shuffling the cards for the three-card spread I purposefully made sure each card was upright. Ok, now this is what blew me away. I laid the first 3 cards down and placed them in their position Past, Present, Future. I turned each card over one by one and again, all 3 were reversed and had mimicked the five-card spread in terms of my blockages/healing. I said no way something must be wrong. To get clarification of future events you are allowed to pull a 4th card and so on depicting time in months. The card pulled was also reversed. Scratching my head I turned over the rest of the cards one by one but not to lay on my spread for further clarification. All were upright. I freaked out. I put the cards back together and thanked the Faeries for their advice/guidance. I just sat and reflected on what just happened. This is a very "POWERFUL" deck but not for the timid. I "HIGHLY" Recommend this deck for anyone who really wants to get an understanding of their life. It's good for Spiritual, Emotional and Physical well-being.

—T.A. Nixon, Amazon customer

$23.95
Joie de Vivre Tarot
Joie de Vivre Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT JOIE DE VIVRE TAROT:

I can review this deck with one word -- "whimsical" -- it's like cute Goth. The colors are in the pastel range, in a way that seems to dampen the gloss from the cards. Shady but definitely not dark. The queen of cups is a mermaid with a blue heart on the end of her tail; she is sitting on a rock delighted by a couple of fish jumping out of a large cup. The water is a grayish blue and the sky is kind of yellow, reminds me of hazy morning light.

The creepy does come through. The queen of swords is wearing a worn dress, messy hair, skulls hanging from her waist and a rickety sword in her hands ... she looks annoyed to say the least. But then you see the Devil and he’s not as scary as in other decks. Oh, he looks mischievous, with his wicked grin and cricket style legs/arms. He has shrunken heads hanging from his shirt and has a person on marionette strings. He reminds me more of a street performer.

These cards are full of so many intricate details that you could spend hours just looking through the cards. They could easily serve as your go-to deck for readings.

-- Lilac Wolf, on Pagan Writers Community


Paulina Cassidy has created the charming Joie de Vivre Tarot. Her style of art, her use of color, her images, are so delicate and perfect! I have not set it down since I received it! French for 'the Joy of Living' the name truly captures that child-like joy and essence.

I have searched through the deck to find a favorite card, to display for my review, and cannot find just one! So being the Pisces I am, I chose 'The Moon.' I also love the night, and the music of the night. Paulina has named Phantasm, with an audience of 3 mesmerized white owls, named Haze, Daze and Maze. Owls, the symbol of Wisdom, just look into their little faces, they are lost in the watery world of stars reflected on the peaceful water of the night. And a colorful dragonfly sitting on the end of the violin, cannot get close enough, I think. How creative and lovely, not a style many may copy! We moon people delight in being different, in every way imaginable. The last thing I notice is the golden glow of the stars surrounding her as she lights up the night.

A lovely lady of mystery, and wonderful card to meditate on. What wisdom do the white owls hold for you? Take time to sit with them awhile, and see what your mediation reveals.

A must have deck for any Tarot Reader. Even the Rider-Waite diehards will enjoy this one, as on each card, is a symbol from the most traditional Tarot decks. You just have to look closely, and see what else is hidden within each playful card. Enjoy!

-- Linda, on Maiden of Mystery


The images of Joie de Vivre Tarot are unmistakably the work of Paulina Cassidy. They are fanciful, otherworldly, and, at times, macabre. It seems to me that in her first deck, Cassidy was trying to hold back just a little, maybe trying to be a wee bit tarot-proper. In this deck, she has given us a full view of the landscapes inside her head.

Many of the characters have sweet faces with big eyes and pointed chins. There is a very Victorian feel to the deck. There are clever elements to the images, such as the clock in the hair of Lady Temperance. While the images on the cards are certainly non-traditional, they make sense, and are delightfully imaginative.

I have a theory about this deck. I think it will be very effective for intuitive/psychic tarot reading. The reason is this. Joie de Vivre Tarot is arguably the most imaginative deck ever. It communicates emotion, and sparks imaginative thought. Imagination is seated in the third eye, or brow chakra. This chakra governs the eyesight with which we view the cards, as well as our psychic vision. By stimulating the imagination and the eyesight, these cards will stimulate our psychic ability as well. Joie de Vivre Tarot will be a great deck for anyone who finds it appealing, from beginners to professionals

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I found this deck to be highly useable and a delight to read with! In the introduction, the author describes the deck as "designed to access child like energy in each one of us to help stimulate, enhance and inspire joy in our own lives". While that sentence may hold true, don't underestimate this deck as some tarot lightweight. I’ve gotten some deep insights and clear answers from it.

I always appreciate the quality of US Games card stock -- once again, this is a sturdy one that will hold up well to years of tarot readings. This is a really important selling point for me. There is nothing worse than a flimsy deck -- but you never have to worry about that with this publisher.

The images on the cards are whimsical with fantastical creatures that convey the messages in a playful manner. From the Mad Hatter-like Magician to the space mouse on the 8 of Wands, this deck is a quirky and fun tarot adventure that will bring joy to anyone who reads with them.

The artist still favors muted colors but unlike her previous work, this time there is a lightness present that creates a soft and pretty hue. The images are easy on the eyes and I did not have to put on my glasses to read with them. There are fine details that merit a close inspection but again, it was much easier on to see them, which was a happy plus for me.

The deck comes with a little white book that includes meanings for each card as well as for reversals (important for me as I am a fan of reversed cards). What I really found delightful was that the author named every character in the deck! There’s Jaunt the Fool with her bat companion Prudence, Discordia falling from The Tower and Nucleus the space mouse on the 8 of Wands with his alien friends Zoom and Boom – and so many others. Cassidy put full on creativity in this part and I just loved reading these descriptions. Often I will ignore the “little white book” but this one was just plain fun to read!

-- Theresa Reed, on the Tarot Lady Book and Deck Nook


"Joie de Vivre" -- French for "joy of living". And yes, this is a joyful, light-hearted deck that brings out the child in each of us -- something that we don't do often enough! In her introduction Cassidy notes that the living beings that occupy this realm are all sentient souls of love who want the best for those that choose to journey through their world. They will help you lighten up in order to better tap into your intuition and connect with Divine source. The Seeker will find themselves responding through heart, mind, and spirit.

The presentation in the LWB (Little White Book) is what I have come to recognize as the style of U.S. Games Systems, Inc. -- text only, keywords, a short paragraph describing the energy of the card, and the upright and reversed meanings. At the end of the book is a unique six card spread entitled "Spreading the Joy", as well as blank pages for note taking. The author bio is something that you will want to read also -- because it is here that you will find that Cassidy has been a student of energy healing for over ten years, and applies her studies in Reiki and pranic healing to her visual art, and that she also composes and records songs. Certainly the energy of the healer comes through in this deck!

The art is very gently done fantasy, in pastel colors. The Fool seems to be floating through the air, and there is a bit of the Mad Hatter in the Magician's top hat. The Hanged Man hangs from a vine in mid air, while the Two of Wands is a lovely muse standing with a globe in one hand, and her owl companion appearing to be sitting on her head.

This is an excellent deck to use with clients that are a little nervous about the Tarot, or to take yourself, or a client, "out of the box" in your reading. It would also be a wonderful deck to use in a comparative reading. The artwork alone is worth the price of the deck!

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


This deck is so well conceived that each card could stand as its own little universe. In readings it communicates in a clear, rich and friendly way thanks to the lovely card images and characters that inhabit them.

-- John Alan, The Tarot Guild


Cassidy adds a new cast of characters to her lively world of inner adventure. These magical illustrations lead us through the traditional 78-card tarot format with whimsy and wisdom. Beautiful to look at, and insightful in its imagery, this will make a good starter deck for those new to tarot, as well as a joyful addition for serious students of the tarot.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
Crystal Visions Tarot
Crystal Visions Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CRYSTAL VISIONS TAROT:

When you open up the Crystal Visions Tarot by fantasy artist Jennifer Galasso, you are entering a different world -- a colorful one filled with crystals, fairies, animals and mystical figures. The artist was inspired by Stevie Nicks' latest CD "Crystal Visions" as well as her interest in crystal balls.

I was enchanted with the vibrant images right away. The artist's color choices are bold and bright yet still ethereal. Purples, scarlet reds, deep indigos and lush greens make this deck a visual feast for the eyes. While the art is fantasy based, it manages to steer away from being too cheesy. Although some of the figures were a bit cartoonish, overall the look is whimsical, romantic and mythical. Based on the standard Rider Waite Smith system, this deck stays almost true to the tradition -- there is an additional card in the deck, giving you 79 cards rather than 78. This extra card is called "The Unknown Card" and when it lands in a reading, it represents something that is "not yet meant to be revealed". The usual Majors are featured and the suits are traditional Cups, Wands, Swords and Pentacles. Court cards are Kings, Queens, Knights and Pages.

Different flowers and animals represent each suit:
Cups: emotions -- water lilies and dragon flies
Swords: intellect and conflict -- ravens and winged creatures
Pentacles: material things and money -- crystals, fruitful trees, wildlife
Wands: creativity -- candles, sprites, dragons

While I enjoyed the art in the Minors, the Majors are the standout part of this deck. My favorites were the Hierophant with the pope sitting on a throne in front of a stained glass window adorned with different religious symbols; the eerie Death card with a ghostly figure standing above a seemingly dead female on a headstone; the mighty Emperor with his ram's mask and The Devil with a playful Pan like figure in the background trying to entice a naked woman who lounging by a tree with an apple in her hand (who is tempting who?) I would recommend this deck to any tarot collector, any fans of fantasy art, younger readers or beginners, as well as anyone who enjoys crystals and faeries. There are no really creepy images, making this deck appropriate for everyone. Two Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady


If you like fantasy art, (and who doesn't?) this deck is a must have for all Tarot deck collectors and readers. It's beautifully illustrated, full of symbology, and evocative. Based on the traditional structure of the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) system of a 78 card deck, you will find the familiar names of the Major Arcana, the Court, and the suits: Wands, Cups, Pentacles, Swords. Included is an added bonus, The Unknown Card. The images are clear in their detail and of sufficient size to see them clearly, and surrounded by a narrow white border. The backs are reversible with a large opalescent sphere in the center which is surrounded by a filigree of rose vines and gems. A pentacle rests in each corner, while a chalice sits in the center at top and bottom.

This beautiful deck would be appropriate for beginners to more advanced readers. I believe I will be spending many delighted hours now and in the future, working with this deck. I’m sure clients will find it as pleasing, if not more so, as I do. If you happen to be on the fence about purchasing this deck, I would recommend it for either yourself or as a gift. It's a win-win!

-- Koneta Bailey, New Paths Tarot


Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to the classic Rider-Waite 78-card system in much of its symbolism, as well as in card and suit names. The luscious card imagery also illustrates the elemental aspects of each suit in order to aid the novice in forming associations with the cards. The Crystal Visions Tarot deck includes 78 cards with an additional unknown card for gazing into future situations that have not yet been revealed, or for exploring issues with deeper insight. The instruction booklet offers both upright and reversed meanings.

The LWB provides an Introduction to the deck along with descriptions and divinatory meanings for each card, including meanings for reversed cards. I am impressed with the amount and value of the material in this LWB. We are given the usual DMs but we are also given insight into the reasoning behind the depiction of the characters on the cards. For example, the description of The World includes: "The characters depicted in this card sits on top of the world in the lotus pose. She appears to be meditating, listening to the hum of the universe. She wears a necklace with the Hindu symbol 'Om' symbolizing the most perfect integration of mind, body and spirit."

The colors on these cards are soft yet vivid. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel. The characters primarily consist of broad-shouldered, well-proportioned men and beautiful, slender women with long, flowing hair. These ethereal images are pleasing to the eye in both color and style. Each suit has its own consistent color scheme, inspired by the element associated with that suit. The Cups cards feature violet and magenta backgrounds; the card titles are black on a pinky lavender bar. Swords cards are indigo and lavender, with the titles written on a lavender-blue bar. Pentacles cards are shades of green and brown, with the titles written on a pale olive-green bar. Wands cards are orange-red and maroon, with the titles written on what I would call a rosy beige bar. The artist's "cool" and "warm" palettes make it easy to recognize the elemental associations in any given spread.

The symbolism on the cards also ties in nicely with elemental associations. For example, the moon appears in in various phases on all of the Cups (Water) cards. Lions and dragons appear on many of the Wands (Fire) cards. Birds or butterflies appear on most of the Swords (Air) cards. Trees and plants dominate the scenes on the Pentacles (Earth) cards.

This deck is likely to appeal to readers who prefer traditional RWS titles and symbolism, but also like to work with cards that feature romantic, fantasy-style art suggestive of the Faerie realm. The level of detail in the images encourages closer study of the cards, yet is not overwhelming. Although the characters are not people you are likely to see in your everyday life, many of them are approachable and engaging. The Unknown Card may not appeal to everyone, but you don't have to use it if you don't like it. I recommend meditating on The Unknown Card before shuffling and drawing cards from this deck for the reading.

-- Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


When I saw images of the Crystal Visions Tarot deck online, I thought it was very pretty, but I just didn't realize how beautiful these cards actually were until I bought them and held them in my hands. For many decks, sample images don't truly do a deck justice, and this one is no exception. Having these cards in my hands to shuffle and read with on an up-close-and-personal basis allowed me to quickly connect -- and to classify this deck among my favorites!

I love the feminine feel of this deck. The imagery is beautiful with rich tones that speak to me on an emotional level. And for those who prefer the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) style of Tarot, the symbolism of the Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to tradition -- from the titles and ordering of the Major Arcana Cards (with Strength as #8 and Justice as #11) ... to the suit names: Cups, Swords, Pentacles, and Wands ... to the traditional court card names: Page, Knight, Queen, and King. while the deck is beautiful to look at, it also renders such beautiful and meaningful energy in reading the cards. As mentioned, this deck really speaks to me on an emotional level. In fact, I quickly made friends with the Crystal Visions Tarot. Doing my first reading with this deck of cards was like connecting with a dear and trusted friend -- even though the cards and I just met during the first week of January 2012. What a lovely way to start my new year in the world of Tarot!

If you are familiar with a RWS deck, you can read the Crystal Visions Tarot straight out of the box with the understanding that there is that extra card in this deck. But for those who are new to the Tarot, I like the way the author and artist has written the 63-page accompanying booklet. It's far better than most LWB's available for a deck. I feel that even a beginner to Tarot could successfully learn Tarot with this deck and the proper books for learning this subject.

A fascinating thing I noticed in this deck is that for the cards that can signify change or rebirth on some level, there are butterflies as part of the symbolism for those cards. In the description of the High Priestess card above, the author tells us that butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and eternal life. I definitely agree, and I would add to that description that butterflies are a symbol of change. Butterflies can show us a "lighter" side of a situation, or can show how thought transforms or changes one's understanding of life and circumstances.

This is a deck that I plan to use frequently since it feels as comfortable to me as the RWS traditional tarot deck, and thus I appreciate the fact that a quality cardstock has been used for this deck. The quality cardstock will allow the Crystal Visions Tarot to stand the test of time with heavy usage.

While I noted that this deck has a feminine feel to me, there are still plenty of male characters contained within the cards. A third of the deck does feature men in the imagery. So it's not a gender biased deck. It just has a soft, gentle, nurturing, and feminine feeling for me. Of course, I don't want to leave you with the impression that this deck is filled with fluff and can't tell it like it is. It definitely can tell the tale of a difficult and challenging story in your life, but at the same time, it's like having a friend by your side who will offer comfort, support, and guidance to get through whatever you're going through. This is the kind of gentle strength that offers empowerment.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone who enjoys the RWS tarot decks, to those who want a gentle deck that has a softer approach (yet still powerful!), and even for those who are just starting with the Tarot. The Crystal Visions Tarot follows RWS tradition in a way that doesn't clone or copy the familiar and well-loved kind of traditional tarot deck, but is still similar enough to immediately resonate with. Collectors will also want to get a copy of this deck, too.

-- Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


To call a tarot deck "different" is definitely vague. The Crystal Visions Tarot is different from many tarot decks I have come across. The cards reflect Galasso’s fantasy style, so those who enjoy fantasy-themed decks will surely like this one. Most of the characters on the cards are women, which is a change from many more traditional tarot decks. Similar to the back, the cards are colored in mostly soft pinks and purples. Each card has a colored rectangle at the bottom with the name of the card, and the background color changes depending on the suit of the card, which is great for the reader. The card backs are simple yet complex, with pentacles in each corner and a circle in the center adorned with flowers. A chalice adorns the center of the long ends of the card. The entire back color is muted and soft, pleasing to the eye and drawing you in. The cards are shiny but not slippery. From an imagery perspective, the deck has some similarities to standard RWS symbols, but it is far from a clone. The Fool in this deck walks off a cliff, but instead of a dog she is accompanied by a number of butterflies.

Galasso's attention to detail is impressive -- the Ace of Cups is one of the most beautiful cards I have ever seen in a tarot deck. One interesting fact is the many of the cards have some kind of reference to air -- a dragonfly, fairy, butterfly, or other winged creature -- which is something you don't often see in tarot decks. I especially liked the Death card, which has Death holding a staff topped with an ankh and the inscription VITA MUTATUR NON TOLLITUR (Life is changed, not taken away) on a tomb. Butterflies reinforce the overall transformation feel of the card. It softened the card but rendered it neither foolish nor powerless, which is a fine line to walk.

This deck also features an additional card, bringing the total number of cards to 79. "The Unknown Card" is explained as an area of the reading which requires further examination -- like a past event, for example -- or that additional steps need to be taken to clarify the bigger picture. I'm not a big fan of extra cards in tarot decks, especially with vague descriptions, so likely I'd use the deck without this one.

While I'm not a fan of reading with fantasy decks generally speaking, I intend to give this one a try. I think my clients will like it, and I know I'll enjoy reading with it, especially when I need a change from RWS clone decks and I'd like something soft yet powerful.

-- John Marani, in ATA Quarterly Journal


The first thing to note about this deck is the beautiful use of color in each card. A major strength of this deck is its ability to create a mood or feeling with each card by such masterful use of color. In the author's own words, the cards have a "vibrant and consistent color scheme, in order to be easily recognizable within a spread."

The artist has consistently portrayed each suit experience through specific colors, crystals, people and other beings. She also assigns elements to each of the four suits in the LWB. The world and its artwork are largely influenced by her work as a fantasy artist and illustrator.

Coins -- the scenes take place in and around tress, lots of greens and yellows, crystals and earth spirits.

Cups -- all scenes take place in same locale and include water lilies, dragonflies, the moon in its different phases, pinks and reddish purples.

Wands -- features lions, unicorns, horses, mountainous terrain and lots of red.

Swords -- the scenes are bleak, cold and snowy with nurds and other winged characters.

One particularly striking card for me is the 4 of Swords. A woman lies at rest on her back in snow that almost covers her, and her arms are crossed as if keeping her only slightly warm. Swords, roses and petals are strewn on the snow around her, and the whole scene is viewed from directly above her. While her face is expressionless, the image itself is felt at first glance. In readings I have found that the characters' faces and eyes do not communicate nearly so much as do the gestalt of colors, symbols and flow of details in each card image. Messages with this deck seem to be toned down in an almost introverted style for a nice and gentle read, much like getting advice from a dreamy friend who, even in anger or elation, remains subdued and calm.

-- John Alan, on Tarot Guild


I love the colors and sense of grace in this deck. The intention with this deck was to create art that was unique, but that would be close enough to traditional imagery to allow new readers to learn the Tarot easily. This is a traditional 78 card deck with one additional card in the Major Arcana, entitled the Unknown Card. It represents an answer that is not yet ready to be revealed. I love decks with an extra card like this”! The Unknown Card can refer to something from the past, or something that is going to happen in the future. The area that this card falls in indicates where steps need to be taken to clarify the big picture. There is also a hint to move forward with an open mind, leaving all bias behind. I loved this card before I even knew what it represented -- my thought was "Yes! Another deck with a card that is 'gifted'!" What an incredible card, with the female figure holding a crystal ball in her left hand. In front of her we see the shadow of an owl. Her whole body posture invites the Seeker to peer into the crystal ball! The artwork is done in a fantasy style, using reds, greens, lavender, and dark brown predominately. There is a sense of gentleness and "otherworldliness" that draws one in, and makes one feel right at home.

This is one deck that if I had my way, I would talk about each and every card! However, that is not allowed, so we will look at the cards that pulled me in the strongest. One of my birth cards is the Hermit, so that is one card that I look at in every deck. If there was a make or break card for me, this would be it. Here we see a lone figure, in a lavender robe, sitting atop a mountain, with a lamp in their left hand. They face the right hand side of the card, generally considered to represent the future. To me, they appear very wistful. The Empress stands in the middle of a garden, wearing a bright red dress, and carrying a triskele scepter in her right hand. She holds a heart-shaped charm. Lush greenery is behind her, as well as a tree with bright green foliage and ripe red fruit. In the upper right hand corner of the card we see beautiful butterflies.

The Lovers shows a man and a woman embracing, with flowers in the right and left hand lower corners. The figures are bound by ties held by two doves.

The Ten of Swords in this deck is one of the least scary, but saddest, images of this card that I have seen in any deck. A female figure is face down in the snow, bloody, with ten swords in her back. She is surrounded by snow and barren trees. The clouds in the sky behind her are attempting to part, indicating that there is hope.

The Eight of Pentacles shows a female figure, standing at her spinning wheel, paying ardent attention to her work. I like this card because she is working outside, with greenery surrounding her and a tree behind her.

The Fool in this deck just carries incredible energy! The figure is a female, with dark, flowing hair. She stands on a precipice, one foot on land and one in the air. There is a trail of butterflies in the air to her right.

I found this deck very easy to read with, and feel that it would be a great deck to offer clients as a choice for their readings. The art alone is gorgeous, and the additional card (the Unknown Card) opens up new avenues for reading. It could simply be taken out of the deck if the reader preferred not to use it.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I felt compelled to look through the cards a second time, and a third. Each time I did, I saw something I hadn't noticed before. There are figures of people in the twisted tree branches, and delicate angels in the clouds. The lush flowers and trees have lovely texture, as do the brilliantly colored dragons. The skies and landscapes are evocative. When I looked closely at each card, I realized this isn't a trite deck. I felt like an old woman who has mistakenly assumed a young, pretty girl to be shallow and stupid. Crystal Visions Tarot is true to Rider Waite Smith structure and interpretation. In many cards, the subtle symbolism honors a wealth of tarot tradition, often in clever ways.

It would take a long time to describe all the cards I love in this deck. They include the Fool, who is female. Butterflies, appropriate for the air correspondence of this card, also surround her. Her dress has red ribbons, one of which has casually wrapped around her leg, giving her the ancient tradition of the Fool's red-striped legs. In the World card we see a large lotus flower cradling a globe on which sits a woman in lotus position. More butterflies here, not elementally appropriate, but acceptable, because they are flying out of her palm chakras. As I mentioned earlier, I question the addition of a seventy-ninth card, entitled The Unknown Card. This card says that the answer is, at present, unknowable. Perhaps we need to look within and find the answer in our own heart. The card is actually quite lovely. It shows a modern Goth-looking young Pagan woman holding a crystal ball. The image is rather different from the rest of the deck. It stands out as a special card, belonging to none of the suits. It is a legitimate tradition in random token divination to use a blank token. It makes sense for Galasso to offer us this option.

That I have already started using Crystal Visions Tarot for professional readings is the highest praise I could give any tarot deck. However, I was initially unsure if I wanted to use the Unknown Card, or use my prerogative to remove it. So far, I have left it in the deck. I must admit, it pops up at very appropriate times.

It has been a while since I've discovered a new deck to add to my short list of professional reading decks. Crystal Visions Tarot is attractive, evocative and easy to understand. Unlike many fantasy art tarot decks, its images are uncomplicated and traditional. Do not be fooled by its youthful energy, Crystal Visions Tarot will give great wisdom and depth. It will be a solid learning and reading deck for anyone from beginners to seasoned professionals.

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


Fantasy artist Galasso has transformed classic tarot imagery into a vibrant tour, through a crystal ball, into a magical world filled with fairies, fantastical creatures, and exotic flowers. Color creates the backdrop against which the story of each card is told. Lyrical and mysterious, the illustrations almost sing.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
Dreaming Way Lenormand
Dreaming Way Lenormand

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DREAMING WAY LENORMAND

I was so excited when I received this deck today!! I had only been able to see three of the cards through the Internet and was anxious to see if all the cards would be as lovely. The answer is yes!! The cards are simple and gorgeous!! The art is a little funky but that is one of this decks charms. The entire package is first rate. The box is sturdy, yet beautifully done. The LWB (little white book/guide book) is so cute. I can't believe they took the time and made such a finely made LWB. The cards are more than I could have asked for. Big simple images (which is important in Lenormand readings) that are whimsical, artful, and fun. I have seen lots and lots of Lenormand deck. I have quite a few. But this deck is my favorite BY FAR!!! Can't wait to try them out!!!

— Customer


I'm a professional graphic designer/art director who studied art and design in college. I know what I like. I also happen to be married to a tarot luminary who is a deck collector, so I do have a fair bit of exposure to the world of divinatory decks.

The Dreaming Way Lenormand is a GORGEOUS package! The production values are off the charts. I find the card stock and solid packaging to be first rate. Definitely collectible. The sturdy box is thoughtfully designed and nicely printed. The booklet has a thick, full-color card-stock cover, and the printing is top-notch. Kudos to the designer. And yes, Lynn Araujo's introduction and the card descriptions are superb. The writing is smooth and lyrical and perfectly compliments artist Kwon Shina's work. This will be a deck I will use while learning the Lenormand system. The reflective quotes for each card are well thought-out. For example, the Garden (20) card has a Charles de Lint quote that states, "I do believe in an everyday sort of magic --- the inexplicable connectedness we sometimes experience with places, people, works or art and the like." All-in-all, the design of both the cards and the LWB are done with a very professional and informed touch.

The cards themselves feel wonderful in my hands. They're printed on thick stock and have impactful imagery. I really dig the recurring cloud motif. The Duchampe-esque card-back is nothing short of magical! The card imagery ranges from very straightforward (clover, house, tree) to more complex art that tells a story the longer you look at it (birds, bear, mice, fish). The Dog card truly captures a sense of loyalty with its unique presentation. Some standouts for me are Clouds, Coffin and Bird. There is a lot to explore here, lending to more expansive readings as the user becomes more familiar with the cards. This is a must-have for Lenormand fans and anyone who loves art that evokes a sense of wonder and playful surrealism without deviating from core meanings as described in the book. As a beginner, both art and writing provide the perfect platform for easy reading with a captivating twist.

— Kort Kramer, Amazon Top 1000 Reviewer


Who can resist the blend of Lenormand cards, Kwon Shina’s art (which I knew and loved from the Dreaming Way Tarot published by U.S. Games), and commentary by the accomplished Lynn Araujo? Yes, I was “predisposed” to like (love) this deck – but I think maybe you are, too!

Anyway, for those of you convinced that there were a limited number of ways the Lenormand cards could be presented and they’d all been done, Kwon Shina didn’t get the memo. Her Bear (card 15) is a person covering his or her face with a bear mask; her Fish (on card 34) seem to be flying rather than swimming, protected from the elements by a large umbrella; her Book (card 26) has an open door carved out of one side. The Fox (card 14) is draped over the shoulder of a woman as if it is her pet or part of her apparel. Exploring each card is a delight and a challenge.

Araujo’s Little White Book is written in a clear, concise style that imparts a lot of information without droning on and on. The Introduction brings us into the process and elements involved in the creation of the deck. I really like the idea of using quotations from famous people to represent each card and the quotations that were chosen. 

Card backs feature a row of houses and a whimsical, jester-type figure in a butterfly mask. The figure is repeated randomly in various sizes and places – in the sky, on the roof, etc. I get the impression that the figures are rising continuously from the ground into the air, pausing occasionally to pose on a rooftop. I suppose they could also be floating downward to land on the ground. Or both at the same time!

The Little White Book includes an information Introduction by author Lynn Araujo, who also provides a two-page spread on each card featuring the card number, title, and playing card association; a quotation; a description/discussion of the card meaning; and a set of keywords.  Araujo’s clear, direct writing style is perfect for seasoned Lenormand readers as well as beginners.

A section in the back of the booklet titled “Reading with Dreaming Way Lenormand” offers examples of a 2-card spread, a line of five cards, and the Spiral Spread, which can be done with any number of cards (ten cards or more seems ideal).

— Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes blogspot


This very sweet deck is the original artwork of Kwan Shina whom you may know of from the Dreaming Way Tarot Deck. The accompanying booklet is written by Lynn Araujo.

This deck differs from so many others, like Maybe Lenormand, in that it is original artwork – no photoshopping a deck here and I so appreciate that.  The colors are light and bright for the most part, no cards in this deck have a dark feel which many will appreciate.

You will also get a vibe that this deck is whimsical, it has an almost fairytale feel to it.  This again will be appreciated by those who don’t like the more “traditional” looking decks and want something more suited for their tastes of a more “current” style of Lenormand deck. The cards all have the playing card noted in the lower bottom of the cards after the cards name, the traditional Lenormand number of the cards is top center.  The way this information was included (and I strongly feel playing card info is needed on all Lenormand decks) was  included does not detract from the look of the artwork which can happen.

I spent sometime working with this and first thing to note is these are poker size cards 2.5 X3.5 inches.  The quality of the card stock is good and the deck does shuffle well – something important – at least to me.  They come in a very sturdy box that will protect them well and I actually used the box lid upside down as a book holder for the LWB as I was getting acquainted the cards.

All in all the imagination and almost dreamlike sometimes ethereal look to the cards is sure to be a hit and I hope enjoyed for many years to come. The deck should be currently available at local merchants by you and if not ask them to order it for you!

—Hugh Irving, World Lenormand Association

$15.95