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Star-Spider Speaks Book
Star-Spider Speaks Book

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE STAR-SPIDER SPEAKS BOOK:

An absolute MUST for use with the Native American Tarot Deck

Anyone who enjoyed the Native American Tarot Deck must have this book. It completely explains both the meaning and the history behind each card, plus it provides insightful meditation points to strengthen your knowledge of this powerful, unusual deck.

-- L. Fletcher, Amazon customer


If you own the deck, you need to own this book!

This is the companion book to the Native American Tarot Deck. Though the small booklet included with the deck will get you started, this book will give you even more details and interpretations, not only of the cards but also of Native American teachings and beliefs. It also includes handy reference pages for comparing the Major Arcana symbolism across many beliefs & cultures and various card spreads to use for meditation.

-- Sam, Amazon customer

$9.95
Medieval Cat Tarot
Medieval Cat Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MEDIEVAL CAT TAROT:

When I heard of the Medieval Cat Tarot I was a little skeptical. I would have thought the market for cat decks was becoming rather crowded and that it would be hard to make an impression, but the Medieval Cat Tarot manages to stand out with its novel blending of traditional and modern imagery and style.

I was pleasantly surprised when I opened the box and began to examine the cards. They are glossy, smooth and very polished in appearance; a little longer and thinner than usual cards but very easy to handle and with a nice feel. The cards were inspired by fifteenth century art, and have the look of the historical Visconti-Sforza. The very consistent artistic style was created by Lawrence Teng, who also worked together with Gina M. Pace (Wicce) to complete the companion text.

The Major Arcana cards feature stately cats with bodies in human poses, their head and feet cat-like in shape but palely human in colouring. The symbology has a traditional foundation, but has been stripped down and reduced of clutter. The Minor Arcana take a new direction and combine modern and standard styles. They appear to be traditional looking pip cards in the background, but in the centre have a kind of porthole. Here, a RWS-style scene has been condensed down its essentials and shows a medieval cat participating in the activity or feeling of the card. Some scenes have been altered to be more immediately clear and aren't a complete RWS clone, but they somehow seem truer to the meaning. The best card of these cards in my opinion is the Seven of Swords -- a blue-dressed cat stands next to an empty and rocking birdcage, empty of its canary but drifting feathers. Others worth mentioning are the Four of Pentacles, a portly cat holding a ring of keys in front of a heavily padlocked door; the Eight of Wands, where a cat stands poised with a note on the end of an arrow, poised to fly, to name but two.

The major cards have standard Rider-Waite style titles, but are without numbering to avoid the Strength/Justice conundrum. Of note is the Empress, who has the significant addition of children, and she stands in a very Hierophant-like pose with her hands on their hands (though it appears somewhat more caring). The Devil is a fox-like creature, expensively dressed and hiding behind a cat-shaped mask. I particularly like Death, showing as it does a robed Death figure who has a feline skull and jaw. All of the feline figures are elegant and well dressed, and no strong emotion passes their face. They are rarely kitschy and never cute -- above all they are dignified, as a cat should be.

The court cards are titled traditionally, but in imagery are a departure from the traditional. They have been changed to more clearly differentiate between each other, with the element develops from the Pages through to the Kings. Each court figure is dressed in a different period costume, and interacts with their element in a different way.

The booklet is small and staple bound, but includes a satisfying amount of information and meaning for each card in English. The card backs have an almost reversible (they are reversible at a distance) design, though they are intended to be read upright. The Medieval Cat Tarot is simple and clear enough to be an easily readable for the beginner and intermediate reader, while at the same time it is an original and polished deck with links to Tarot's history and European tradition. A deck for the cat lover, the lover of the Renaissance era, and most especially for the Tarot reader.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I thought this would be a light-hearted deck mostly for show. I was wrong. The symbolism is remarkably clear and the cat faces don't in any way detract from the ability to take this deck seriously. The images are charming in style, faintly folkart-ish, and it's a very easy deck to read. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants an accessible deck, including those new to tarot.

-- GriffonSong, Amazon customer


I wasn't sure what to expect of this deck, but what I honestly didn't expect was to be as wholly impressed as I am. The cats have not simply been dressed in Renaissance garb or put in tarot poses. They have been depicted to demonstrate precise meanings for the cards, with depth and accuracy. They are not overly cute; rather, they gaze out from the cards with often serious looks of contemplation, and expressiveness that is shown mostly in their eyes. Also, they are not all cat but somewhat human, with human shapes, and hands. One does not have to be a big cat lover to enjoy the deck -- the cats as tarot figures are entirely convincing.

Though the illustrations are based largely on the Rider-Waite, the cards depend on their own imagery. And this they do very well. For example, in the Eight of Swords, a cat stares wide-eyed out from behind bars, which are further blocked by a chain and lock. A key dangles near the cat, though he doesn't notice it. A cat sits with arms crossed in front of his chest in the Four of Cups, three ignored cups before him, and a fourth cup being offered to him on a tray. His gaze is cast to the side. The miserliness of the Four of Coins is indicated in many locks on a cat's door. He holds a ring of keys, but the task of opening the door looks tedious. The sense of being overly cautious, protecting or guarding what one has, is obvious. The little booklet explains the card with good balance: "The Four of Coins shows where we feel threatened by what we have experienced in the past; our security is exercised in overkill because our perception of danger or struggle is much more than the reality. We may actually be safe, but we still feel intimidated. We must realize that our foundation has been laid securely and we may now build upon it." Another good example of this effective use of simple imagery is the Three of Wands, in which our cat holds a small ship in one hand, a telescope in the other. The text that interprets this card for us says, "The Three of Wands symbolizes the ability to see what it is that we are launching and to put it into motion. We carry with us the small tokens that remind us that we are responsible for putting our own ships out to sea if we wish to see our ships return overflowing with prosperity and abundance." The pictures are incredibly clear in meaning, but the artwork is purposeful, rich, and ornate. Interpretation and understanding are accessible, while the aesthetic experience is fully rewarding.

The Majors are not numbered. The artist states simply, "Some of the first tarot decks did not include numerology symbols or a numbering system in the Major Arcana. I have chosen that same omission for Medieval Cat Tarot. As there is some interchangeability with a few of the Majors (most often Strength and Justice), this allows the reader to use the cards at his or her discretion." I will just note -- for those who might be starting out -- that this does not make using the cards any more difficult. A traditional ordering of the cards is presented in the booklet. Most of the Majors stick to expected imagery, though often with a whimsical or lighthearted air -- The Hanged Man reminds me that cats always land upright from a fall, because the featured cat here does not exactly hang upside down as is standard -- he looks ready to land safely if he falls. This seems to intend a hopeful aspect of a card that is sometimes misunderstood as frightening or ominous. The grim reaper in Death is surrounded by butterflies, which indicate personal metamorphosis. It is a purely positive element in what some believe is a difficult card. And the Devil is a fox hiding behind a cat's mask, and makes clear the meaning expressed in the booklet: "It is the Devil inside each of us that this card addresses. We are our own worst enemy -- we bedevil ourselves at the times when we undermine our own best efforts to get clear of the repeating patterns of behavior and abuse in our lives. This Devil, for example, hides behind a mask, much as we hide behind our own denial when we fight ourselves on many levels."

Also notable in Medieval Cat Tarot, is the emphasis on the court cards to provide insight into the self, rather than to merely serve as representations of others. These are presented largely as a progression of the self, which stage one might be in, etc. The court cards can still represent another, but they are clearly described as phases in development, and in this way are quite helpful. An included spread, "The Court Cards Curve," is an aid in learning to see the court cards in this way.

Because of the simplicity in symbolism, the deck would be a super choice for someone just starting out. The accompanying booklet offers more than enough instruction on the meanings of each card, along with added insight and clear ideas for interpretation. It is a highly readable, very strong, and well-rounded deck, in image and word. My own readings with it have been highly useful and insightful. I recommend it for everyone -- except perhaps, those who really don't like cats!

-- Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot

$21.95
Vampire Tarot Deck
Vampire Tarot Deck
What customers are saying about Vampire Tarot
 
I own this tarot deck and I fell in love with it. Each card has such character and is poignantly beautiful. I did a reading for a friend with it and she kept commenting on the eyes of the characters. You look at them and they seem to be looking at you. There is something deeply moving about the cards. I would look through them all over and over as each one is a work of art. My favorites were the Sun, the Hermit and the Fool. I adored this deck because it wasn’t all flowers and smiles. It was a bit gothic, striking and different. I wouldn't say it's dark and evil. It's just elaborate and gothic looking. People have long held a fascination with vampires because of their mystique and we all want to know what lurks in the shadows. In this deck, the vampires come out of the shadows. I would be picky with decks and never had much love for the traditional Rider-Waite as I found it "boring". Vampire Tarot is eccentric, alluring and different. I would really recommend it to anyone looking for an individualistic tarot deck. Let the eyes draw you in.
—Martha Clark, Amazon customer

I find this deck mesmerizing and accurate. The blood element may freak some people out, but it really isn't as macabre as it seems. The blood in this case is meant to represent life, so this deck really gets its message across in a different and powerful way.
 
I often take them out just to look at them. True the cards don't have a zillion things happening on them, but I find those kinds of decks taxing and needlessly complex. We aren't stupid, we don't need a thousand tiny details to understand what the cards are telling us. What I really appreciate about the Vampire Tarot is that, unlike so many other decks where the characters are distant and passive, in this deck the characters appear to acknowledge your presence and seem to be active participants in the reading. Another great thing about the Vampire Tarot is that the booklet provided with the cards explains the symbolism of the artwork of all 78 cards as well as their upright and reversed meanings. The cards are also very well glossed, and are a very good size to shuffle normally.
 
I highly recommend this deck to anyone ready to graduate from simply reading the cards to really understanding and working with the cards.
—“M from Manitoba”, Amazon customer

The pictures are beautiful, scary and completely hypnotic. Anyone who does tarot and does it consistently will agree that some decks have a bit of personality during some readings. This one packs a punch. Brutal honesty, meant to be that snarky advice that snaps you out of your "issues".
 
I'm aware that some tarot decks are just lovely pictures, but buy this deck in full confidence if you're looking for a deck that doesn't candy coat it's messages. Other decks are vague and fanciful...this one skips the sweets and right to business. Vampire Tarot is the best tarot deck I own.
“ShadowsCursed”, Amazon customer

II have never come upon such an intriguing and inspiring deck. It is my favorite, and I use it constantly. The Vampires have become my friends. I can consult them on anything from the wisdom of a financial venture to the well-being of my family. Of course they don’t always tell me what I want to hear, but they do always tell me what I need to know. For this, I love them.
I highly recommend this deck for those who are passionate about dark literary and fantasy figures such as vampires. Those who are intrigued by the unusual and the visually beautiful will also find this deck very appealing.
Cathi Bitzer, Aeclectic Tarot

I purchased this deck on a whim because the beautiful artwork was completely irresistible. Hertz's dark and brooding but beautiful characters HAD to come home with me, though I doubted I would ever use this deck in a reading. After examining it further, however, I am quite pleased with my spontaneous buy. It seems to be a rather accurate, if sometimes humorously gruesome deck.
Many of the cards in this deck draw on familiar images from standard decks such as the Rider-Waite, yet still hold their own in artistic expression. The High Priestess, for example, has on her familiar Hathor-like crown of glory, but it is formed from her hair, seeming to indicate this position is from her own achievement, not one bestowed upon her. The Strength card depicts a woman with her typical enormous feline companion, but it is the woman who is wild and needs taming. 
This deck is not only for the eyes, however. Since we all have dark sides, and skeletons in our closets, this may be the perfect deck to use when confronting difficult and dark issues. While the Justice card in most decks is righteous, honorable and regal, the Justice in this deck scares the bejeebers out of me! But perhaps that is the point. The whole theme of this deck is a look into the darker world, the world of Vampires. If I, or someone I loved, were threatened in any way, you'd bet I could become the Justice depicted here. She conveys a power and fierce strength that few people are willing to acknowledge they have. And though the pictures in this deck deal with the most base of human issues - survival - there is an honesty about Nathalie's creatures that many of us have lost. They are unashamedly themselves, with no apologies offered. Taking a step into the world of Natalie Hertz's vampires could oddly enough reveal a more human you. 

Napaea, Aeclectic Tarot
$21.95
The Goddess Oracle Deck/Book Set
The Goddess Oracle Deck/Book Set

 

What customers are saying about Goddess Oracle

Divination has never been as sensual. This is an absolutely gorgeous collection of Goddess deities ... carefully researched... stunning... uplifting... The illustrations are truly remarkable. It is important to note that these cards are designed to nurture the feminine in all of us, regardless of gender - the Goddess bolsters those aspects of everyone's totality that have been historically disregarded, for example, intuitive abilities, creativity, sensuality, and nurturing skills.

—The Bodhi Tree Book Review


This deck of divination cards is excellent for anyone who is interested in goddesses from different cultures, as well as Tarot enthusiasts, alternative religions, or just in pretty artwork. Hrana Janto, the artist who painted the deck, worked hard to make each goddess both representative of the traditional symbolism surrounding her religion, as well as the various ways women "are" in the world. We have round, full-bodied women, young, old (the Sheila Na Gig is amazing, for example), thin, black, white, and all shades in between. There are women in the deck who could be supermodels, and some who look like they've had (and are proud of having) a couple of children. And all are reverence with the "goddesses in every woman" theory of all bodies and beauties being wonderful. The deck opens itself up for a number of personalized types of readings for the person who is looking for answers. You can use multiple spreads or just one card.

I recommend this deck as highly as I can, and the new US Games version has more durable cards, and are smaller as well, which could work a lot better for smaller hands to shuffle. The fine research into goddess traditions done by Marashinsky is still relevant, and I think this deck & book would make a great Christmas present. In fact, that's how I received it, and it is a welcome member of my Tarot collection.

—Kimberly Wells, Amazon customer


I love pulling a single card to define the goddess energy for my day or ritual, or to choose a working path. As for the cards, they are really beautiful! Each shows a detailed image of a goddess, with realistic backgrounds and supporting characters in the form of animals, plants, symbols, colors, and other people. They also have a key word, as well as the name of the Goddess. I also love that they depict a real variety of women of all ages, from pre-teen to crone, all body types, and different racial types. I’d recommend this exquisite deck to anyone wishing to explore goddess energy in their life or in their readings. The artwork is realistic, beautiful, with a great variety of colors, and although there is some nudity, it is never gratuitous.

—Chloe McCracken, Aeclectic Tarot


Wow!! Such beautiful illustrations, I found my female clients (and myself) have really enjoyed their readings from this deck and have come away from it feeling positive and very inspired to get in touch with the divine goddess within!! Beautiful and powerful cards to work with.

Loudeano, New Zealand


I purchased this card deck quite some time ago. It was recommended to me, by a close friend and mentor, that I consider an oracle deck vs. tarot as a divination tool. An oracle deck seems to allow more room for your own interpretation and use of intuition. I am a psychic medium, currently starting my own business doing readings, and I strongly identify with this deck. The images are all feminine and gorgeous. I adore the artistic style and connect strongly with the fact that each image is of a Goddess from cultures around the world. My readings have been clear and this deck has helped to open me up to my intuition, and to trust what comes through. The book that comes with the package is informative for the beginner and gives information on each individual card/Goddess along with a poem that helps you understand the feeling/message behind the card. Very nice and highly recommended, even just for the artwork!

Bibliophilia Eclectica


I had an amazing reading done with this deck a year ago and finally bought it for myself. It's great! The artwork is beautiful and I find the cards really speak to me. The book is good for a quick overview of each goddess but there's so much symbolism in each card, you can let the images guide you on their own.

­—C. Palmieri, Amazon customer


A very lovely deck and book set. Many will be familiar with Hrana Janto's art -- it has often graced the covers of PanGaia or SageWoman, and she has had a number of calendars featuring her images. I enjoy Marashinsky's writing and her attitude about spirituality. This deck is wonderful for divination and ritual use.

—Audra, Goodreads


The Goddess Oracle Deck is beautiful art combined with well-written explanations for each card in the deck. What amazed me is the accuracy in which the cards and descriptions fit with each reading. It is an amazing deck and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in adding to their existing collection and especially for first time beginners. After much research me and my wife settled on this one and we weren't disappointed, gorgeous, well-written descriptions and accurate.  Kudos to the designer and originator of this exquisite deck!

—Thomas W. Moon, Amazon customer


I own a few tarot and oracle sets, and this is by far my favorite. The artwork is absolutely amazing and easy to connect to. I don't use my decks often, but I love to take this one out to just look at the images. Very strong goddesses, each and every one, and the small stories in the booklet inspired me to look up the history of the individual goddesses as well. The spreads suggested also work quite well.

—Trina, Goodreads

$31.95
Vanessa Tarot
Vanessa Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT VANESSA TAROT:

The Vanessa Tarot does for illustrated pip Waite-Colman-Smith based decks, what Major Tom's Tarot de Marseille did for the Marseille version Tarots, and dragged it (the Tarot) into the 21st Century.

The Vanessa Tarot will perhaps be the most overlooked Tarot of 2007. 'Serious' Tarot folks will eschew it, many will never get past the Magician -- and will poo-poo it as a silly novelty. But the Vanessa deserves a closer look. It's nothing short of brilliant!

Let me start with the LWB -- it deserves framing. This should me the new standard for LWB's. It is well written, concise, and is arraigned by numerical value as opposed to suits. And what is said about each card -- makes sense. Some folks enjoy saying 'Tarot is a language', perhaps because such a statement eludes cogent response, However the Vanessa Tarot IS a language. Gone is the weighty esoteric symbology, leaving behind clean image concepts -- that translate smoothly into nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs and articles. Many cards easily fill encompass several of those labels.

Yes, it's a feminine deck albeit not feminist. Marketing may well relegate it to the early teen female market segment of the populations, and that’s a shame. The deck is also multicultural.

Some examples: The 10 of Wands eschews the burdening issues and displays an attitude of study -- or 'workload'. The Knight of Wands wears a parachute and stands in the doorway of an aircraft in flight. In the Four of Cups, she sits in front of the Tarot Café, while a hand enters the picture from the left offering a cup. It's tres mondo coolaroonie!

The cards measure 9.5cm x 6cm, perfect for your hands, and get this ... they come in a metal case.

This deck, and the LWB rock ...

-- Dan Pelletier, Aeclectic Tarot


The Vanessa Tarot is a glamorous and feminine interpretation of tarot into completely modern scenes and symbols. Created by talented Filipino illustrator and multimedia, Lynyrd Narciso, creator of the Sailor Moon Tarot and Tarot of the Lepidopteran People, it is his first deck to be picked up by a major publisher -- U.S. Games Systems.

The deck has been inspired by the heroines of pop culture (Jackie O and Sophia Loren are two recognisable women) and is wholly female, glam, young and modern in all its aspects. The cards were originally inspired by dolls, and in places the women retain a slightly big-eyed, big-headed anime look, but the colours are anything but lady-like, instead using rich, deep colours. They're also images of put-together, strong, capable women. They are judges in Justice, beauty queens in the Universe card, warriors in the Seven of Wands, and fashion designers in the Three of Coins. They ride motorbikes in the Knight of Swords, drive their own sports cards in the Chariot, and bake in the Kitchen in the Magician.

The women of the Vanessa Tarot almost entirely inhabit modern scenes and life in a way few decks have managed. It's not a tarot with a few contemporary scenes mixed in with the usual medieval Christian or occult symbolism, but a tarot that has been translated completely into modern lifestyles and references. Its illustrations include a Knight of Wands, poised to parachute out of a plane; the Knight of Swords riding a motorbike; the Ten of Wands, where a student works at a desk piled high with books, lit only by the glow of a desk lamp.

The cards have the Rider-Waite tradition at their foundation, but often move the scenes towards their more literal interpretations as well as more modern ones. The Queen of Swords in the deck is a veiled woman at a funeral; she is literally the widow or aloof woman. The Seven of Swords removes the ambiguity and shows a woman in the midst of a burglary, getting away with the safe.

The whole Vanessa Tarot set is a beautifully designed package of 78 small, matte, and easily-shuffled cards, 2 title cards, and a similarly small 32-page booklet, carried in a very durable purple tin box (not cardboard!) with a separate lid. Perfect for keeping in handbags, backpacks or purses.

Inside, the cards are about the same size as playing cards and fit easily in small hands. They are easily shuffled as they have a much more matte cardstock than is often usual for decks from US Games, and lack that tendency to slide off the table like a waterfall. The backs of the cards have a simple and reversible design of a purple background with blue stars and thin blue vertical stripes.

I'm a big fan of the Vanessa Tarot and its fun, feminine yet strong approach to tarot, without being flowery or fluffy. Lynyrd has translated conventional tarot scenes into more relevant scenes of contemporary life, making a deck that is easy for beginners to use and relate to without having to deeply delve into the study of tarot symbolism.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


When the Vanessa Tarot arrived in the mail, the first thing I noticed was that I really liked its tin box. What a good idea it is to package a Tarot deck in a box that can actually be used to carry your cards in your purse! And that is when I started to understand Vanessa Tarot's real deal. Yes, this is exactly the deck to carry in your purse. And, if you are like the characters of this Tarot, your purse may be a Coach, a Louis Vuitton, or a khaki backpack or leather briefcase.
 I am in no way a designer girl. In fact, what I am is a crusty old Gloria Steinem-type feminist from the Seventies. But, as I looked through Vanessa Tarot that first time, I had to admit that this is really a special deck.
 Vanessa Tarot is smaller than most, measuring only about 2" by 3," according to my thumb. The card backs are reversible, and done in a nice purple pinstripe with lavender stars. The cardstock has a matte finish, and is of the good quality that we have come to expect from U.S. Games. Overall, it is a nice deck to look at and to hold in your hands. For all of its great quality and special packaging, Vanessa Tarot retails at only $15. That, girls, will leave you some money left over to spend at the mall!


Vanessa Tarot comes with a standard-sized LWB (Little White Book) that gives quick descriptions of the Major Arcana card images, and upright and reversed meanings for all the cards. The Minor Arcana is sorted by numbers rather than suits, and there is a paragraph about each number preceding the interpretations for the four cards of each number set. Each Vanessa Tarot card is illustrated with cartoon-like drawings of women and girls. There are some male figures in the deck, but they are supporting characters. Vanessa Tarot pays tribute to the girls and women of pop culture from today and yesteryear. Television and movie stars make an appearance, as do many "types" of modern women. There are businesswomen, glamour girls and daredevils. They are all either pretty or cute, and all skinny. They are dressed in styles from many periods of fashion.
 The Minor Arcana cards are as detailed as the Majors, which is a feature I appreciate.
 The deck truly won my heart when I saw that my favorite TV character from childhood, Samantha Stevens (Bewitched, played by Elizabeth Montgomery) appears in her classic pose, sitting on her broomstick, as the Eight of Wands.
.

I passed the deck around to many of my students. Overall, the reaction was positive. Many felt that this would be a particularly good "first deck" for our daughters. Even some of the more mature students liked it, especially those with an eye for glamour and fashion. One older student, whose favorite expression is "It's all about the outfit!" was particularly taken with it.
 Another great thing about Vanessa Tarot is that none of the images are particularly dark or scary. This would be a great deck for some of the professional bookings that I often get, in nightclubs, at college parties and all-night high school graduation parties. 
And what about my crusty feminist self? Well, bear in mind that the second deck I ever owned was the Motherpeace, and I have a particular penchant for Goddess Tarot decks, such as the beautiful one by Kris Waldherr. But Vanessa Tarot, with all of its cuteness and glamour and designer-type fashion, is the only one I have seen that had the ovaries to make all four Kings female! Yes, all of the main characters are female. And they all seem pretty happy doing what they're doing, whether it’s being dressed to the nines, keeping house or jumping out or an airplane. And if that's not female empowerment, I don't know what is!

-- Christiana Gaudet, Tarot by Christiana

$18.95
Whimsical Tarot Deck
Whimsical Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Whimsical Tarot

The Whimsical Tarot is a lot of fun -- although I originally bought it for my children to use, I found myself drawn to some of the really clever imagery. Hanson-Roberts uses traditional fairy tale characters to portray the divinatory meanings of each card. The Major Arcana, in particular, are well chosen, as are the court cards. This is a great deck to use if you're teaching kids the Tarot, or if you just want to expand your own horizons a bit. The artwork is lovely, and the card associations are clearly thought out. Definitely worth buying, if you enjoy Tarot and classic children's stories!

—Patti Wigington, About.com


Drawn by Mary-Hanson Roberts, who also created the art for the Hanson-Roberts Tarot and the Universal Waite Tarot, the Whimsical Tarot is based on fairy tales and nursery rhymes and intended for children and the 'young at heart'.

But it is by no means limited to children. The fairytales are familiar to almost everyone, the simplicity and already associated meaning with the cards helping to make tarot more accessible to a beginner.

Some of the cards make me chuckle, others I find impressive because of the approachable rendering of normally disliked cards. The Devil card, for example, shows a pair of hands controlling a marionette, a puppet on strings. The Death card is Sleeping Beauty.

I adore the backs of the cards. A lilac flower is in a rectangular focus in the center of the card. Surrounded by a mauve border, then a thicker border of yellow Celtic knot work on a turquoise background, it is restful, appropriate for upright or reversed readings, and very pretty.

I highly recommend the Whimsical Tarot as a child's tarot deck; for people who read for children; or for sensitive souls who aren't keen on confronting images on their tarot cards. The Whimsical Tarot gets the message across without being dark, negative or scary.

I also think it is a good beginners deck, as the fairytales used on each card allow the tarot novice to hang the tarot concepts on a framework they are familiar with. Learning seventy-eight different tarot meanings and how to interpret the tarot symbols can very seem daunting, but the Whimsical Tarot's cards are cute and the scenes already familiar. Hanson-Roberts combined traditional fairytales and tarot make a beautifully presented, sweet, and thoroughly whimsical tarot deck.

—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


She sat down and flipped through the deck, her eyes lighting up as the realized that she recognized all the fairytales and stories within each card. She squealed with excitement when the 4 of Swords reminded her of the Princess and the Pea, and she jumped up and down in her seat happily as the Magician bought back the story of Puss in Boots. When she had finished looking through the deck, she handed it back to me, with a grin from ear to ear adorning her face: My Mother appeared to like the deck.

As can be seen from my Mother's reaction, the Whimsical Tarot is aimed at children and the young at heart. The cards are adorned with fairytales, nursery rhymes, and stories that we were told as children, and as such, there are many adults who can use this deck very effectively. The benefits of using fairytales and such to illustrate the meanings of the cards is that nearly everybody is familiar with most of them, and thus can understand the meaning in the card without having to look in any book. Fairytales bring back fond memories of childhood, and those nights on the sofa with your Granny, when she would make you hot chocolate and then read Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm to you until you were too sleepy to stay awake any longer. The attraction of a deck surrounded by, and based upon, these stories is understandable.

This deck is largely traditional: the names of the cards, the suits of the Minors, the ordering of the Majors, and the meanings of the cards are all Rider-Waite traditional. The only thing that differs is the pictures used to illustrate the cards, as these are taken directly from the fairy stories applied to each card. All of the cards are fully illustrated with the gorgeous artwork of Mary Hanson-Roberts. The Court Cards are particularly appealing, all being characters from stories, with the Queen and King usually being from the same story, eg- King and Queen of Pentacles being Maid Marion and Robin Hood. The Pages in this deck are the most interesting I have come across, and certainly the easiest to understand! Instead of showing people, they show objects, which convey the meaning of the card. For instance, the Page of Swords shows a telescope, and the Page of Pentacles shows gold coins, scales, and a tally-chart. This is a great help, especially for young children and beginners, as it is often the Court Cards that are the most difficult to read.

All the fairytales are well chosen and very evocative. Every other deck I have seen which uses fairytales as its theme has failed in that sometimes the chosen fairytales are chosen superficially, for instance, in one deck I found that the Emperor card was represent by the Emperor's New Clothes, which really didn't have anything to do with the meaning at all. With this deck, that's not the case: Every single card's fairytale is chosen for its meaning and significance. That is an achievement within itself I think, and something that this deck deserves praise for.

I love this deck. It is the best one I have seen which is aimed at children, but which also proves to be an excellent deck for adults! Children, beginners, adults who enjoy fairy stories, collectors, and those who like Mary Hanson-Roberts' artwork would all enjoy this deck immensely and learn alot from it. For myself, after using this deck, I found that I could read better in general: the meanings of the cards took on a more imaginative form, and I could apply meanings from the cards to the querent's life very easily. As an introduction to the Tarot, or as a deck for the more advanced reader, this is an absolute treasure.

—Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot has a great richness to it because it is drawing on our knowledge of fairy tales as well as our knowledge of the Tarot. It works well for intuitive readings based on the images which can speak directly to us at a deep level. Although it may look like a children's deck it is suitable for anyone who is happy with an attractive, amusing deck which has more depth to it than appears at first glance. 


—Fairyhedgehog, Aeclectic Tarot


I have recommended this deck to everyone I know interested in Tarot and while at first they read reviews and see the deck and question me, once they USE the deck for the first time, they are hooked! As the author states in her introduction, the images are intended to appeal to our inner child, our earliest memories and our connections to fairy tales and their distinct sense of right and wrong, good and evil. These descriptions, again, seem simplistic and very black and white, and life deals us, like the Tarot, a mixed bag with gray areas, this deck comes through with clear messages and direction. Like our proverbial Knight in Shining Armor, the message in a spread heralds in with ease and in a manner that allow for deeper reflection as you view the images on the cards.

The artwork in this deck cannot be complimented enough. The images perfectly match the descriptions. Ms. Morrison, in her introduction, compliments Ms. Hanson-Roberts with seeing within her own mind and having an innate understanding of her ideas. This is true for this deck like no other I have encountered. There is a perfect congruity between image and word.

—Kate Robinson, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot approaches the reading of cards from a completely different aspect -- by associating with childhood images and fairy tales. This deck allows us to connect with our "inner child". Although the name may suggest this is a less than serious deck, this deck is a very valuable tool in discovering our inner selves and helping us reconnect with those simple things that give us joy.

The images on the cards do not obviously correspond with the imagery from our experiences with the Rider-Waite style of decks. Gone are the confusing "Quabalah mystery" symbolism that we pondered and studied in order to interpret the meanings of those older decks. This is the use of simple and obvious imagery that gives us instant insight into the meaning of the cards.

The images are drawn from well-known fairy tales and are familiar to just about anyone. The artwork of Mary Hanson-Robert is clean. She gives us very colorful images that attract attention but are not obtrusive. The artwork is not distracting, but is lovely to sit and reflect upon.

As we explore the deck, we find some familiar tarot references. We do have a Major Arcana comprised of 22 cards, all clearly marked with the number of the card in its order, and the name of the card. There is no mistaking the card's association. The Fool - 0 - is the scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz. If you look at the tarot as a personal journey of the one who begins as a fool, this association is very obvious. We have the symbolism of the yellow brick road, we have Toto and so much more. The Magician is Puss in Boots, the High Priestess is the Fairy Godmother. There are some very interesting associations, as with The Emperor being Father Christmas, the Old Woman in the Shoe for the Empress, Judgment using The Cricket from Pinnochio, Glinda for The World, "Goldilocks being discovered" as Justice. The images are so obvious in some instances, yet they challenge you to use your own judgment and personal insights.

I also find myself drawing on my own knowledge of the tarot and associations when I am using this deck. While someone who is not familiar with the traditional meanings of the tarot will find this a very easy and fun deck to use, those of us who are trained in the traditional meanings will not find this "foreign" as there are familiar associations here. When we look at the "Two of Cups", the traditional meaning being a lesser "Lovers" card, it's association is still retained with the story of the "Owl and the Kitty Cat", so we are not totally out of familiar grounds. Pentacles still retains its meaning of material matters while cups still reflects inner emotions. The "Ten of Swords", a card of chaos and mistakes, shows the story of Humpty Dumpty falling off the wall. The traditional meanings are not told in the mysterious symbolism but in very obvious and well thought through imagery.

The small details on the cards not only attract attention but allow special reflection and a good look at one's inner self. And these special touches make this a remarkable deck. I love this deck for personal contemplation. I have also used this deck for clients who wanted to examine their own personal feelings and issues and it has provided much insight. It works as well with clients as it does with personal readings.

I would also like to suggest that if you have a youngster who is interested in tarot cards and readings, that this would make a perfect first deck. As our children watch us using the cards, they will also want to explore the path with you, as all children look to their parents for guidance. This deck is so perfect for the younger apprentice that I couldn't think of any deck more perfect for the "almost teenager" or the "First Deck" gifting. If you are looking for something that is perfect for a holiday gift, or someone just starting, or the "first deck" give this deck a viewing and see if you don't agree this could be the deck for you.

—Margaret Foster, Amazon customer

$21.95
Tarot Margarete Petersen
Tarot Margarete Petersen

What customers are saying about Margaret Petersen Tarot

Margarete Petersen is a Berlin based painter who has also spent time in Bavaria and Switzerland. She began painting Tarot cards (and Tarot based images) in 1979. Her artwork in this deck is extremely abstract ... often not following traditional imagery/symbolism. The trick to reading with these cards is that you need to back away ... to create a space between the cards and yourself ... and allow the images to come to you. The longer you look at the cards, the more images you will see.

The 78-card deck and accompanying LWB (Little White Book) come as a set in a sturdy box with a lift-off top. The box is a light, light gray, with elegant gold print. The central part of the card The Fool in printed on the top of the box, in a circular, vignette format, with a silver border on the right hand side, and a gold border on the left hand side.

The booklet (3 3/4" by 5 3/8") is 78 pages, and bound. In her foreword, Luisa Francia describes the drafts of early versions of Petersen's cards that came into her possession, and how they differed from the final cards. As those who follow the process of any deck may well realize, sometimes our personal preferences are not the ones that make the final cut! She also makes a very important point in that Peterson is quite good at working with subtle energies, and being able to describe the interplay between energy and matter. With Petersen, and Petersen's sister, Elizabeth, Francia undertook her first Tarot experiments and trance journeys.

In her introduction, Petersen speaks of being very much "at home" in the worlds of myth and fairy tales. Her initial encounter with the Tarot in 1979 reopened a world that had been discouraged in her childhood. She was touched by the symbolic language encoded in the cards of the Tarot. Beginning with the imagery of the Waite-Smith Tarot, she began to look for other images, and other levels of meaning.

The cards are presented without scans, and without keywords/meanings. The meat of the card is presented through a poetic interpretation for the Major Arcana, which is seen as connecting us with story and myth. The Court Cards are presented as speaking for themselves, and of their relationship to other family members, and as representing the "social web" of life. The Pips (numbered cards) are representative of our actions/reactions in the physical world. Each element is described in terms of how is appears on the Physical Level, the Mental-Psychic Level, and the Relationship level. Also given are the boundaries that each number represents. At the end of the book is a short ... two page ... section on reading the Tarot. No spreads are presented. The cards themselves are 3 3/4" by 5 1/2", which do present a problem for those with smaller hands. They are of good quality, card stock with a matte finish. The backs have an orange-based swirling pattern, such that they could not be differentiated in the upright or reversed positions. The faces of the cards have a light gray border, with the card Title across the bottom and the card number, in Roman Numerals, across the top (for the Majors), Title and Suit (for the Court Cards) or Number (in text) and Suit (for the Pips) in dark gray across the bottom of the card.

Some of the Major Arcana have been retitled: The Magician/Magic, The Charioteer/Chariotess, The Hermit/The Crone, The Hanged Man/Trial, Temperance/Mediatrix, and Judgment/Renewal. The Court Cards are Mother, Father, Daughter, and Son. The suits are Flames, Cups, Feathers, and Coins.

While this is definitely an art deck, with its modernistic, futuristic quality, but it is also a deck that opens the reader to the world of spirit. The deck took twenty-two years to complete, and was her whole world during that time.

Some of the cards from the Major Arcana, such as the Fool, The High Priestess, Strength, Trial, the Tower, the Moon, and the World carry fairly traditional imagery, even though they are presented in a modernistic style. Some, such as Magic (the Magician, which is presented as a mask), the Empress (the Emperor, the Hierophant, the Lovers, the Mediatrix (Temperance, which is presented as walking between the worlds of alchemical transformation), the Devil, the Star, and Renewal (Judgment) are quite abstract.

The suit of Flames is done predominately in shades of red, orange and yellow. The suit of Cups is done in pastel blues, grays, and yellows. The suit of Feathers is done in shades of blue, white and purple, with a hint of orange/red. The suit of Coins is done in shades of gold with a hind of blue/gray, orange and brown.

This is definitely not a beginners’ deck. It is a deck where symbols appear where they have never appeared before, and the cards have to be read "in the moment". Look for figures and angles to appear the longer that you look at the card. This is a great deck to read with, but not one that I would use for readings for others unless they chose the deck themselves for the reading. It is a wonderful addition for a collector, or for someone who appreciates art decks. It is also very high on my scale of life for use in meditation and journeying.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


When I first opened this deck I thought… there are no images on most of these cards! Just muted blurs of colours and textures. How in the world could I read with these cards and get any meaning out of them, after all, the words are in German!I sat with the cards and threw my first layout. I allowed the cards to 'flow' from the deck and into the layout. Sitting quietly, grounded and ready to read, I picked up the first card.

Oh my Goddess, there were images within those swirls of colours! I didn't see them at first but there they were. Changing and 'flowing' before me. I immediately became completely enthralled with this deck. I looked forward to my nightly routine of throwing the cards and discovering what insight they wished to share! I found the readings to be very emotional and insightful. Touching deeply on what was happening now as well as shining light on tomorrow. The intensity of these readings were surprising and became something I eagerly looked forward to each evening.

I was fortunate enough to have someone who speaks German in my life and they translated the Minor Arcana for me but I decided to let the book stay foreign to me… I enjoyed the relationship I was creating with them and found the unknowingness of Margarete's intentions to be freeing… it opened me to the 'flow' in a way I truly enjoy. Usually once I finish reviewing a deck it goes onto the bookshelf in my living room while I move onto another. This one is staying by my side! It lights the journey of my 'flow' like no other deck I've used and has quickly become another one of my personal favorites.

—Aleesha Stephenson, Timeless Spirit Magazine

$39.95
Cat's Eye Tarot
Cat's Eye Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CAT'S EYE TAROT:

The Cat's Eye Tarot has a lovely, fresh, uncluttered feel to it, with a subtle realism to the artwork. Debra has also taken great care to depict the same color combinations throughout each suit, such as all oranges and yellows for the Wands, and all plush pinks and reds for the Cups. The same kind of cat graces each suit as well: red tabbies for the Wands, Siamese cats for the Swords , brown tabbies for Pentacles and black and white cats for Cups. These are clever choices, as anybody who knows these different types of cats will tell you. Siamese cats, for instance, are known for being vocal and talkative, whereas red tabbies, or ginger cats, are often more assertive, larger, and independent. These nuances make the Cat's Eye Tarot brilliant for any beginner to read with, as they aren’t esoteric or occult, but rather express the nature of each suit simply.

The deck comes with a lovely spread to try: the Nine Lives Tarot spread. It's fun, insightful and charming, just like the Cat's Eye Tarot itself. Overall, the Cat's Eye Tarot is very cute, clear and easy to read, with brilliant Minor Arcana in particular that make it a great deck for beginners but also a wonderful addition to any experienced reader's collection.

The Major Arcana are quite clever, in that sometimes the cards feature the traditional symbolism, but hidden in the card in a way that is in context for the deck’s theme. In The Hierophant, for instance, a big ginger tomcat stands proudly on a desk in a study filled with books. Veterinary textbooks sit in a pile on the desk, along with a computer and a set of keys -- the keys found originally in the traditional Hierophant image. This is an innovative, modern and accessible way of expressing the card's meanings of learning from authority, or received wisdom: the veterinary student's cat. The Devil is another example of the card meanings made applicable not only to cats but to the modern world: an obese cat eating yet more food that he doesn't need.

The strength of this deck really lies in its Minor Arcana, which are not only extremely easy to read, but also express the feline point of view of the card meanings without making them obscure. They're also extremely cute, in places funny, at times sad and tear-inducing (particularly for us "cat people"!) and beautiful. The traditional card meanings are innovatively illustrated, which means that the Cat's Eye Tarot is a good deck for more advanced readers to look at and use to shake themselves out of old, tired reading habits or to gain new perspectives and insights into the cards.

-- The Tarot Review


If you have ever shared your life with one cat or many, you already know just how individualistic they are. Much like people (some would say more like women than men) they each have their own, very distinguishable personalities. But, unlike their human counterparts, they are more straightforward with showing you who they really are. However, you don’t need to be a "cat lover" necessarily to connect with and use the Cat's Eye Tarot.

I found the Cat's Eye Tarot to be quite engaging, playful, and very much to the point when it was called for. Cat's have a language all their own, and yet, it can be easily understood. They have as many diverse personalities as any group of "humans" and that is evident in each and every cat that is depicted on every card.

No longer skeptical about a cat themed working deck, I would recommend this one not only to cat lovers, but also to Tarot enthusiasts of all experience levels.

-- Koneta Bailey, on New Paths Tarot


Debra Givin refers to her deck as "uncluttered" in the LWB and I completely agree. The illustrations on the cards are artistic, but they capture the essence of cat behavior extremely well. We have cats in many various poses -- hiding, playing, and resting -- and many in which they're just being themselves. One of the reasons I like the images so much is that they speak for themselves; there are very few "symbols" on the card in addition to the animals, and that makes for a clarity that I rarely see in a tarot deck. You'll see a few nods to standard RWS imagery here and there -- the Empress is present with her kittens, and the Wheel of Fortune has a wagon wheel -- but overall the cards are uncomplicated.

Cats are not the only animals on the cards, though. While felines rule the majors, each one of the suits was selected with a particular animal and cat color to enhance the meanings. Pentacles cards have brown tabbies, for example, and feature mice as the preferred prey item. Swords, on the other hand, reinforce the air element and are represented by the talkative Siamese cats, and show birds as well as the cats. Suits have the standard associated for RWS decks.

Givin explains that she includes the keywords from Joan Bunning's Learning the Tarot. A short explanation of the image and some examples of what each card might mean in a reading are a part of the LWB as well. There is also one tarot spread listed, the Nine Lives Spread, based on the old cat proverb, "A cat has nine lives, 3 he plays, 3 he strays, and 3 he stays."

I also like that these cats are for the most part adult cats, and not kittens. OK, OK ... I'll be the first to admit that I love cute kittens, but the fact that these are adult cats gives the deck a maturity that it wouldn't have had with playful kittens on every card. I'm sure I wouldn't have been as fond of the deck, either.

My obvious bias toward cats aside, this is a great to give to a tarot beginner. I'm really fond of the images and their simple yet powerful tone, and combining it with Joan Bunning's meanings and only one spread was a stroke of genius. This would also make a great gift for the ailurophiles in your life -- even non-tarot people would enjoy these beautiful images of cats.

-- Rev. John Marani, ATA Quarterly


There are several cat themed decks out there but this one is truly special, not only does it follow the Rider-Waite style, each card tells a story from a very unique perspective ... A cats! What better way to see the world than through the eyes of a beloved cat. Debra, a practicing vet for 22 years, exclusively in feline practice, she has absolutely captured the essence of cats in this deck and with each card there is no doubt as to what is going through these glorious kitties' minds.

This deck is simply perfect in size and works great for those with smaller hands as it's not too wide to shuffle and handle properly and it has an amazing glossy lamination. I'm big on the art of the card backs and have been known to choose decks in part by the wonderful imagery on the backs and this deck does not disappoint. It features a brown long-haired tabby with mesmerizing green eyes that nearly fills the whole card save one thin border of white.

The Major Arcana are graced with cats of white, calico, ginger and tabby, black and siamese all lovingly painted in scenes of blue and plum tones that make these little kitties pop right out of the cards. I always look for a select few cards when considering a deck and the Star is among one of them. I love the way that Debra has portrayed a little calico gently reaching out to the reflection of a star in chilly stream and it brings to mind the phrase "reach for the stars" what a great way to get the meaning of hope across.

The Minor Arcana are just as charming with the suit of Wands picturing fiery ginger cats, the suit of Cups showing wonderful jellicle kitties, the suit of Swords featuring the talkative siamese and the suit of Pentacles with it's tabby striped beauties. Also featured alongside these fabulous felines in the Minor Arcana are fish, reptiles, birds and mice.

I had the best time while working with this deck, I found that it reads very well and I had no problems getting clear and concise messages, just like ones I receive from any cat when he/she is letting me know how it is! I may not recommend it as a beginner's deck, however, I think that a basic knowledge of the Rider-Waite symbolism would be helpful but this is truly a deck for anyone who loves and shares their life with cats.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic

$21.95
Beginner's Guide to Tarot
Beginner's Guide to Tarot

What customers are saying about Beginner’s Guide to Tarot

I cannot praise this deck highly enough, not just for its outstanding artwork but for the numerous practicalities of its presentation. Indeed, all involved deserve a lot of praise. The deck can only be bought as part of a fairly lavish package, titled the Beginners Guide to the Tarot. Not only would the book still be an asset to anyone's Tarot library, no matter how advanced, the whole glorious package retails for around the price of a standard U.S. Games tarot deck, making it in my book just about the best bargain I've ever added to my collection.

In terms of presentation, the book is teaming with monochrome illustrations taken from the deck itself. A particularly nice touch however, is that dark blue ink, rather than black has been used both for text and illustrations, making the whole presentation much softer on the eye. Moving on to the proper content of this set, it really is difficult to know where to start - mainly because there's just so much that's good and down to earth practical. It's probably best to start with the book. Juliet Sharman Burke is a full time teacher of both Tarot and Astrology. She is a very good teacher and this book, I feel is her best offering to date. She is a total no - nonsense, level-headed tarot practitioner and the perfect guide for the novice while being able to offer new insight to the more advanced in the same breath. I had always loved the Tarot and been fascinated by it's imagery. When I bought this set and followed the course through I became a good reader as opposed to just a dabbler. For the first time I had a very solid and practical foundation to build on.

Each card is described in individual detail but there are also general overviews of the Majors as a whole and of each suit. She starts with the Minor Arcana, which in itself is a brilliant move. You don't even get to the Majors until you've learned all of these card meanings, done sample readings with each suit on its own, then a reading using all four together. You then learn the Majors, do a Majors only reading and finally a reading with the whole deck. Individual card descriptions are detailed but never labourious. Each card gets more or less a full page and is accompanied by a monochrome reproduction of the card itself which is diagrammatically annotated with key points and handy tips.

Sharman - Burke has devised this deck more or less along the lines of the Rider - Waite but she also draws on the other traditional decks such as the Visconti Sforza and the Marseilles. What results is almost an objectified Rider deck - she debunks all of Waite's subjective occult imagery and replaces it with easier to understand symbols. Hence, Waite's rather obscure Alchemical Wheel of fortune is replaced by the more traditional Fortuna and her Wheel. Also, numbers are absent from the Major cards. This does away with any arguments over card ordering and leaves you to form your own conclusions. When did it ever matter whether Strength was card 8 or 11 to a novice anyway?

A similar pattern follows through the Minor Arcana, which if anything are even richer in detail than Colman Smith's whilst remaining true to her basic imagery. For me, Juliet Sharman-Burke is the only person who has managed to achieve this. What also helps is that each suit has its own consistent color scheme, making the cards instantly recognizable. Colors are related to elements and the elemental attributions are standard - Pentacles - Earth. Swords - Air. Wands - Fire. Cups - Water.

As to purely artistic concerns, the deck, though devised by Juliet Sharman-Burke in every detail was painted by Giovanni Casselli. Its a masterpiece of line and wash style which is elegant, refined and manages to totally avoid the comic strip style trap that many decks can fall into. It really is a gorgeous deck that can hold its own with the best of the rest.

Although aimed at beginners, this package is far more than just an introductory course. It is a timeless deck and book that will continually provide pleasure and insight no matter how far advanced you are. As such it should be a required acquisition to any serious collection as well as the best recommended starting point for anyone interested in learning the art of Tarot.

—Chris Butler, Tarot author and illustrator

$24.99
Dreaming Way Tarot
Dreaming Way Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DREAMING WAY TAROT:

This RWS style deck is the work of Rome Choi and Kwon Shina. Directly from the box: "Dreaming Way Tarot dresses up traditional tarot with contemporary artistic flair. In this exquisite deck, stylish characters breathe new life into the scenes and symbols of the Major and Minor Arcana." I would agree -- this deck does demonstrate a modern flair. The artwork is strikingly modern and fun; it communicates a great deal with just the right amount of images and symbols.

Suits are traditional: Cups, Pentacles, Wands and Swords, as are the names of the Trumps. Each card has a white border with the card title at the bottom in thin black text.

The card descriptions in the LWB give both a short text about the card and what it represents as well as providing keywords for upright and reversed meanings. Additionally there are two short sections called "Characteristics of the Suits" and "Characteristics of Numbers" and a spread in the back of the LWB called "Dreaming Way Five-Card Spread," which is a spread designed to help the practitioner confront issues that may have blocked his or her contentment.

The cards themselves are not as glossy as many of the cards by U.S. Games typically are, and I find that they handle even better as a result; they tend not to slide about at the slightest touch. Cardbacks allow for reversals, as they are a Klimt-like array of circular orbs over a randomly painted green background.

I find this deck to be pleasantly neutral on most accounts. There is no angst or darkness, nor is there excess of cute or cheery images. Characters in the scenes also have well-depicted, though neutral facial expressions, with the exception of a very few cards, such as the Ten of Cups. This is important for me, because often the facial expression can be a visual distraction, or a bias, when reading a card.

Some of the fascinating card transformations in this deck include the Wheel of Fortune, Death, the Moon, Judgment, and the World.

The Wheel of Fortune is almost certain to expand your card meaning once you see it: a woman employs a spinning wheel, meanwhile a long cord full of tangles and knots twists its way through the wheel. The woman has wings, and her face is serene and expressionless.

On the Death card, all that is presented is a female, profile left, in a black gown and holding a scythe with the blade upright. All the colors on the card are dark.

In the Moon card, a girl holds a lobster by the claws with only a huge moon as the backdrop.

On the Judgment card we see only trumpeting angels -- no human figures responding to the trumpets as in the traditional RWS.

The World card bears the least resemblance to the original, and yet this might be my favorite card in the whole deck: an aged man rests peacefully in a chair, clutching a pipe, a book and reading glasses in his lap. Behind him stand a tree covered in ivy.

I would recommend this deck to readers of any level, as the images are easily understood and yet provide fertile ground for expanded meanings and intuitive reading.

-- John Alan, Tarot Guild


"Based on the traditional Rider-Waite tarot deck, the Dreaming Way Tarot builds on standard images and interpretations, adding emotional insight, whimsy, and creativity. The characters in this deck literally presented themselves to Rome Choi in a dream. He relied on his years of tarot research, numerology, and his study of Transpersonal Psychology to flesh out the deck. Kwon Shina captures Choi's original inspiration in her energetic, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, illustrations.

Together Choi and Shina have created a unique deck, which preserves the roots of traditional tarot without simply repeating what's been done in the past. Beginners will be drawn into the cards, finding lots of visual cues to jumpstart their readings. Seasoned readers will be amused, stimulated, and prodded to look deeper into familiar symbolism. This deck is a treat for the eyes, which also provides plenty to think about."

-- Anna Jedrziewski, on Tarotwise.com


"Although the deck follows the RWS symbol pattern, the combination of artistic media, color palette, and the diversity of the figures results in a deck that’s light-hearted and unique. The booklet includes traditional card meanings, but there are some surprises for readers. The booklet also provides a unique analysis of the Minor Arcana in terms of the body, mind and soul, followed by a summary of the mystical meanings of the numbers one through ten and the general roles of the four court cards.

The Page of Cups is a good example of the deck's great sense of humor. The young girl featured in the card has a teapot tied to her head. She looks a uncertain and perhaps a bit worried, as though she can’t quite figure out what to say or how to react. Three fish swim in front of her, a clever symbol of how this Page processes everything through her emotions and tends to be oversensitive to her environment. And the teapot shows how this Page can be somewhat leaky, weeping at the slightest emotional tremor. The Five of Wands is another card that’s powerful but funny. In the scene on the card, a group of young boys are sitting around a table. It looks like they're at a birthday party, and are wearing festive party hats. But something has gone horribly wrong! The boys are misbehaving. Somebody taunted or insulted somebody else, and a fight has ensued. One kid is ducking in the back, trying to avoid getting hit. The kid with the red vest looks like he intends to get his own way, no matter what!

The imagery on the cards is attractive and begs for further exploration.

The sensibility of this deck will appeal to younger readers who are fond of manga, animé and graphic novels, as well as to older readers who want a fresh take on the RWS images. The multi-cultural characters, the mix of East-West styling, the creative use of patterns (like the checkerboard in the Five of Wands), and the unfamiliar juxtaposition of color families tantalize the eye. Sweet!"

-- Elizabeth Hazel, in ATA's Quarterly Review


The Dreaming Way Tarot brings to mind illustrations from a vintage children's book. It has a dreamy, gentle quality about it. The images have a nostalgic feel to them and seem almost familiar.

I really love the style of artwork in this deck, and the contemporary, whimsical clothing fashion that adorns the characters. Oddly, there aren't very many joyous feeling cards in the bunch... everyone seems to sport a pretty serious expression.

My favorite suit in this deck is the Cups. I love the black and white cups, and how they boldly contrast with the dreamy quality of the rest of the artwork. It's so different and unique, I think it's fantastic. The vibrant checkered patterns in some of the Wands cards have a similar effect.

The Aces are gorgeous in their simplicity. The Death card is exquisite. A young woman in a black dress holds a scythe. It is simple and elegant. One of my favorite cards in the deck.

This deck has what is probably my favorite rendition of the Two of Wands. Usually this is a "meh" card for me, but this one is very interesting. The figure is looking out at two worlds, the one he is on, and another one up above, upside down. The one upside down doesn't appear to be as inhabited as this one, so it brings to mind the unlimited possibilities of those who dare to dream far and wide. Whenever I come across the Eight of Cups, it's hard for me to look away. Something about her outfit mesmerizes me. I can see the wind blowing and making her dress bubble up behind her. I love looking at this card. It makes me want to follow her, which is a great way to feel about this card. You're supposed to move on in her direction when this card comes up.

I like the motherly touches in the Queen of Cups, who has a child sitting next to her, and the Queen of Pentacles, who is holding a baby.

The Devil is very interesting, as it is portrayed by a cute young woman, shackled herself, but still in control of the chains that bind her subjects. She has horns and wings... it's a beautiful illustration. But it's certainly not a scary Devil card.

The Five of Wands is a card that hasn't come up for me yet in a reading, but when I see it in the deck, I hurry past it. The main boy's expression is so weird to me. Something about his nose and mouth, almost like he's deliberately making a funny face, but he's not.

The Ten of Pentacles is bizarre too. There are four figures, clustered together, facing the same direction. It's hard to make out where the two middle people separate, unless I look very closely. I'm left wondering what these four have to do with anything.

But overall, the imagery in the deck is quite charming. In fact, while I am typing up this reading, I have just noticed something that I didn't notice before in one of the cards. The Four of Cups is another card I really like in this deck, but I wasn't going to mention it until this thing caught my eye. I just noticed that there are three daisies in the card, but they look for all the world to be photographs, compared with the lines of the other drawings in the card. I am staring and staring at this card and I can't figure it out! It is most curious! It almost looks like real life is poking through into a dream. Like that in-between state between dreaming and waking, when you hear something in the real world, but it plays out in your dream. This card even came up in a reading for a client this week, and I never even saw the daisies!

How it Reads

I have found this deck to read clearly and concisely. It works well to spark intuition, and can also be quite literal. It would be a great deck for storytelling and readings where you allow your imagination to wander and take you to places where you can use metaphorical references. It is easy to see a story unfolding in the imagery of the cards, and they blend together seamlessly.

I did find it interesting, as much as I like this deck, that I only chose it to read for certain clients this week. I didn't select it for any of my male clients, as the cards feel heavily feminine to me. And I also chose in favor of another deck when I read for a client who was feeling very downhearted. Looking through the deck, it does have a hint of melancholy to it, so I passed on this deck when I was looking for a decidedly more uplifting vibe. But when I did read with it, I found it to be lovely and charming, whimsical and honest.

Final Thoughts

The artwork in this deck is beautiful and it lends itself well to intuitive readings. The matte finish is quite nice, so the cards themselves are pleasant to work with. It's one of the most interesting and attractive decks I've seen published in quite awhile. A definite keeper and one that will remain in my regular rotation of reading decks.

— Tarot Dame Blogspot

$21.95
Renaissance Tarot Deck
Renaissance Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Renaissance Tarot

This is one of the most beautiful decks you are likely to find. The Major Arcana are detailed etchings, delicately colored and bordered in gold.

A casual look might make one think that this is a "period" deck, differing from other tarots mainly in the lavish Renaissance costumes shown on the cards. However, it is much more. The artist is a student of art history, in particular the Italian Renaissance, in which the very first tarot decks were produced. This deck captures something of the spirit of those original tarots, in which the Major Arcana were presented as classic, allegorical designs. We've become accustomed to tarot designs laden with 19th-century occult symbolism; this deck offers a refreshing taste of a different kind of tarot, one whose message is open to anyone with imagination and an appreciation of the language of art.

There are many references to Greek and Roman mythology in these cards, as well as medieval folklore and philosophy. So there is a lot of symbolic richness here, although it draws from somewhat different sources than many other decks. For this reason, it is a good idea to buy this deck along with the book, which explains the cultural context of the imagery in great detail, with lots of illustrations from art history.

I have found this to be a reliable and often stunningly powerful reading deck. Perhaps because the artist has studied so many centuries of western art with an eye for recognizing the tarot archetypes wherever they appear, these cards seem to capture the essential ingredients of the human condition with force and clarity. The suit cards in this deck require a little extra effort, however, being more reserved in dramatic content than those in many other decks.

This is a beautiful, powerful deck. Because its inspiration comes from the early Italian tarot tradition, rather than the occult systems of more recent times, I strongly recommend it be purchased along with the companion book, rather than trying to use it with concepts meant for a different sort of deck.

—Tom Waters, co-author (with Mary Greer) of Understanding the Tarot Court


I love the colors and symbols of this deck. When I first saw it I was amazed by the details of this lovely deck. The quality of the drawing and the evocative imagery made me want to use it as my primary deck. I have received many strong readings with this deck, and the questioners are happy afterward. Mr. Williams has a special way of drawing the male and female figure to capture the animus of their spirit. The archetypes are strongly engrained in our collective psyche and the words easily flow from the tableau.

—  Brad Bernstein-Reppen, Amazon customer


This is one of those decks where scanned images just can't do justice for the cards!  The cards on the Renaissance Tarot are embellished with a gold foil-like coloring in the images that make them shiny and really stand out.  The cards are gorgeous!

The Major Arcana cards of this deck portray figures adorned in elaborate costumes and are titled in both the Italian and English languages.  The author's intention for this deck was make it both traditional and original, which he indicates can be an artistic challenge to depict traditional truths in a fresh style.

The pip cards of this deck remind me of a Marseille-styled deck, featuring the number of suit symbols that correspond to the number of that card.  I would have loved seeing full-color scenes like the Majors portray, but the deck is still beautiful nevertheless.

—Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


Delicately illustrated, with gold embellishments, Brian Williams’ artistry gently hints at illuminated manuscripts while it conveys the power of the tarot symbolism contained within the traditional 78-card deck. Relying on classical mythology and four of the great Italian Renaissance cities, he has made the tarot his own. The characters display uncharacteristic emotion and, sometimes unfettered sexually, to convey the essence of the tarot wisdom.

Ultimately, in this deck, it is the eyes which tell the story. Whether they peer out from the face atop The Tower, from the skeleton in Death, or from the leaves on the flower held by The Priestess, the eyes say it all.

It doesn’t matter if you are new to the tarot or a long-term afficionado, this deck will provide many hours of questioning and pondering. It is sad that Brian Williams will not be able to take us further on the journey he has so elegantly begun.His passing was truly a loss to the world of tarot.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com 
$21.95
Botanical Inspirations Deck & Book Set
Botanical Inspirations Deck & Book Set

What customers are saying about Botanical Inspirations

So many things to love about this deck and book set, it’s hard to know where to start – but I’m going to start with the packaging, which is superb. The top of the sturdy flip-top cardboard box features a lush collage of Pierre-Joseph Redouté’s Victorian flower art, including the dahlia, coreopsis, asters, forget-me-nots, and amaryllis, among others. This box is roomy enough for a perfect-bound guidebook with the same illustration on its cover, the deck of 44 cards, a trifold pamphlet listing keywords for all of the flowers shown on the cards, and an organza pouch the same shade of mint green as the box, booklet, pamphlet, and card backs. Also included is a card providing detailed information about Redouté, who was born in 1759 to a Flemish family of decorative painters.

By the late 1790s, Redouté was the most famous and sought after flower painter in Europe. Card faces are a tan parchment color, an attractive background for the artwork. The cards do a beautiful job of combining science and sentiment. At the top, centered, is the common name of the flower, with the Latin name or alternative name centered immediately under that in flowery script. Next comes the Redouté’s illustration of the flower. The style is realistic, and it is easy to see how the artist was influenced by the botanist Charles Louis L'Héritier, who offered Redouté free access to his botanical library and plant collection. Centered below the artwork is the meaning attributed to that flower. Finally, also centered, we have a quotation that reflects that symbolism.

For each flower, the guidebook provides a black-and-white version of the Redouté illustration, the common name and Latin name for the flower, symbolism, quotation, a long paragraph discussing the flower and its meaning, and an Inspirational Message. The eloquent writing in the guidebook is a pleasure to read, offering tidbits of the fascinating history and cultural interpretations associated with each flower. The Botanical Inspirations cards are perfect for drawing a daily Affirmation, and the guidebook can be used as a resource when researching the various flowers and their meanings.

—Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


The Botanical Inspirations Deck, by Lynn Araujo, comes beautifully packaged in a sturdy floral box with a lovely spring green deck bag. The deck and box set includes a Secret Language of Flowers fold-out reference guide that is a shortcut to understanding the secret meaning of the flowers. If you are an herbalist and gardener like myself, you will appreciate the simple beauty and vintage look and feel of this deck. The cardstock is substantial, but shuffles well and the cards have wonderfully rounded corners, which add to the luxury feel of this wonderful deck. The illustrator is Pierre-Joseph Redoute (1759-1840), and the pictures are classic illustrations that everyone can relate to in a reading. Who can resist the "Red Rose" which Lynn calls her card of Hidden Secrets. Red Roses have been given as a sign of romantic love as far back as antiquity. On the card, Ms. Araujo quotes Buddha with the phrase "Three things cannot be hidden, the sun, the moon, and the truth." No truer words have been spoken. It is said that romantic love is the elixir of the Gods and the card of the Red Rose when pulled speaks to our inner-longing to love and be loved without condition. If you are looking for a beautiful and inspirational deck to begin your day with by pulling one flower out of the deck to meditate on then look no further than the Botanical Inspirations Deck, by Lynn Araujo, beautifully published by U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
You won't be disappointed!

—Karen Hollis, Readings by Karen


Wow! It is beautiful with fantastic cardstock I love the box, booklet, pamphlet and bag that comes with it. It full of amazing flowers and quotes. I think all decks (Oracle, Tarot and Lenormand) should be made at this level of quality!

—“Lost Lovely Lady”


I'm a professional Tarot consultant. My first word when I got this deck was, "WOW." The design is the very first thing that caught my eye. The artwork of Pierre-Joseph Redouté has had a long life due to the nature of his talent. He saw things and brought out details in flowers that no one else did. The box that comes with this deck puts me in mind of a miniature writing box from the Victorian era. It is a solidly constructed box too. There's even a small bag for the cards inside the box. The ribbon on the lid along with the lift-out ribbon makes the box a real stand-out.

The cards themselves are quality. They have the images of the flowers against a cream background which enhances the antique effect. You get the name of the flower at the top with the Latin name beneath. At the bottom of the card, you are given a combination keyword + key phrase. Then the card is completed by a quote.

Author Lynn Araujo knows her flowers too. It is obvious that she is fluent in the language of flowers. I particularly liked that she didn't just stick to one cultural reference. Her knowledge has depth to it that sings through her writing.


—Tarot by Arwen

$22.95