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The Herbal Tarot
The Herbal Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HERBAL TAROT:

The Herbal deck is beautifully illustrated. For example, the backs of the cards have a sea-green background with a rosemary border. As if marking elemental corners, there are four eight-petal flowers in blue, as well as two red ladybugs and two white flowers. The illustration of the cards themselves are done with the traditional meaning attributed, but also with the herb/plant/flower which attunes to the card. I find this to be even more helpful in understanding the meaning of particular cards. For example, the Tower is represented with garlic, Knight of Wands by aconite, Four of Swords by mullein, Ace of Wands by yarrow. Each of these adds an additional "feel" to the cards that I find are not present in traditional decks. I would recommend that anyone who is interested in both the Tarot and herbs to seek out this deck.

-- Maiden, on Aeclectic Tarot


I do a lot of readings for other people and Herbal Tarot remains one of my favorite decks. I long ago lost the little booklet that came with the deck, nor did I purchase a set with a detailed book. Instead I cross-reference this deck with my large herbal reference book. It has given me startling insights into the physical health of those I'm reading for. In addition, the magical and mythical backgrounds of the herbs add an extra dimension to the reading. I typically follow the same card interpretations that I would with any other deck and read intuitively, but I find that the herbs add so much. I feel I see the whole picture with this deck.

-- Nevada Sierra, on Amazon


What a lovely deck this is! Herbal Tarot makes you feel good to even use it. Based on the original Rider-Waite deck with an earthy twist! I recommend this deck to all nature & plant fanciers and especially herbal growers and lovers everywhere!

-- Violet Tea, on Amazon


This is a wonderful deck if you're new to tarot or are a person who gives "readings". The pictures of herbs are attractive and I have found that even those who are normally uncomfortable with using the Tarot can use this deck and for those getting a reading they are delightfully surprised at how "pretty" the deck is and may relax and enjoy the reading more. It boils down to this ... If you're a beginner the nice clear instructions and interpretations will appeal ... if you've been at this awhile then you know how to interpret on your own and can just enjoy the simple beauty of the pictures. Basic info on herbs and pictures of the herbs are included along with the interpretations. This is just an all around nice deck ... one that, although I have many others since I collect them, after many years I still continue to return to as my favorite. :-)

-- A.C., on Amazon


I learned from a friend with this deck and loved it. I thought the pictures were very clear & revealing. I liked how the herbal remedies overlapped & brought meaning with the readings. The descriptions seemed right on and very accurate. They definitely were very insightful. I'm addicted.

-- Heather, on Good Reads

$21.95
Tarot of the Witches Deck
Tarot of the Witches Deck

What customers are saying about Tarot of the Witches:

I personally love this deck and it is one of the most frequently used decks for my personal readings. I love the fact that the cards were painted with oils on canvas; the colors are incredibly rich and vibrant and there is a depth and solidity to the images that is rare. There's something psychological here for me as an artist - these feel like the sort of images I would encounter in an art gallery rather than straightforward commercial illustrations. To me this is as much of an art tarot as it is a working deck, which makes me feel good when I handle the cards.

Unlike many of the esoteric decks that are imbued with either breathless solemnity or an almost religious conviction, this one manages to do full justice to the depth and meaning of the age old symbols while somehow not taking itself too seriously. The characters on the cards have a dark, almost camp wit with a slightly sinister edge to them. Everything is wildly out of proportion and ethereally colored yet somehow it all works. If anyone asked me why, I really couldn't say, but the humor in the pictures seems to conceal but invite you to look deeper in the same breath.

I would thoroughly recommend the accompanying Tarot of the Witches book by Stuart R. Kaplan. This gives detailed descriptions of the Major cards and the artist's thinking behind them. Reading this greatly enhanced my appreciation of the deck and its sheer originality.

—Chris Butler, Aeclectic Tarot


This delightful deck has unfortunately been misnamed and mismarketed throughout its existence. It has nothing to do with James Bond or witches but has everything to do with Fergus Hall, the idiosyncratic artist who painted the deck. It should be called simply the Fergus Hall Tarot. Hall got his start doing carnival paintings and that freaky bizarro style shows in this deck. Unlike most 20th century decks, Hall's deck is free of occult or pagan mumbo jumbo and yet is rich in subtle symbolism, such as the mysterious black birds and orange cats that appear on various cards, and the mandala type designs in the center of the pip cards. The books held by the hanged man and hermit contain original poems. (Can't read them? See Stuart Kaplan's companion book). The art is very expertly done and yet is so whimsical and unassuming it's easy to take for granted. The World card is one of the best I've ever seen, downright haunting. This is a very profound deck but at the same time doesn't take itself too seriously. The pip cards are a welcome return to tradition, using the original suits of cups, swords, batons, and coins rather than the recently introduced "wands" and "pentacles" which many mistakenly consider authentic. Also, as in traditional decks, the pips are unillustrated save for Hall's central mandalas. In my opinion, unillustrated pips leave more room for the reader’s own imagination and insight.

A perfect blend of tradition and creativity. You might find this deck puzzling at first, but stick with it. There's an entire little world in every card!

—A. Simone, Amazon customer


These tarot cards should really be known as the Fergus Hall deck.
Many people are familiar with this deck due to its use in the James Bond movie, "Live and Let Die". But it is far more than that.
Abandoning all efforts to reproduce the Rider Waite Tarot, Hall has created a deck with some of the most surreal, yet highly mystical art ever seen on Tarot cards.
Those who are familiar with Tarot cards know that many different interpretations of cards are possible by seeing the imagery on the cards. Hall's imagery isn't for everyone, but I believe the art really draws you into readings in a whole new way.
I have also found this deck invaluable for dream interpretation.
The Minor Arcana return to the old "pip" system.
One of my higher recommendations if you are already doing readings for others.

—Bruce Gray, Amazon customer


I think this deck is absolutely wonderful. You have to use your own imagination and find your own meanings to the symbolism...which in my opinion is what tarot cards are all about. For those of you who want a deck that lays out plainly what the cards mean, then this is not for you. If you have a good imagination and enjoy the type of artistry used in this deck you wont be disappointed.

—Joe Arthur, Amazon customer

$21.95
Native American Tarot Deck
Native American Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NATIVE AMERICAN TAROT DECK:

The cards feature soft colors on a predominately white background with black borders. Hand drawn, colored pencil images make up this unique, slightly masculine, southwest deck. The card titles are in English. Suit titles are only on the Tribal Figures (Court Cards) and Ones (Aces). The pips have a individual card titles; for example, rather than the 7 of Pipes it is labeled Counting Cup, 10 of Shields = Harvest, 8 of Blades = Captive, etc.

The LWB does a good job at explaining different folklore and stories associated with the individual cards depicted. It does not have much in the way of divinatory meanings. The Major Arcanas have no reversed meaning. Leaving it to the reader to use the lessons from the stories and the individual card titles for the divinatory meanings. It might not be suitable for a beginner. It is one of the longer booklets I’ve come across. The LWB also includes some Native American history and 5 spreads.

This is not a deck that would normally attract my attention. I usually go for bold color and computerized artwork. But I showed up at a family gathering without my cards and I was handed this deck by my Mother-in-law, to "pretty please do a reading." So I gave it my best shot and I was surprised at how easy these cards are to read. The artwork is simple, but it has enough detail to really get a lot of intuitive information for a good quality reading. The Stars card is my favorite "Star card", out of all the decks I own. It depicts a large spider in the center of a web with small stars scattered throughout the web, reminding me of the dew in the early morning when all seems new and anything is possible.

After this experience I decided that this was a must-have addition to my collection. Anyone that has an interest in Native American decks should take a look at these cards.

-- Patsy Secord, Aeclectic Tarot


I like these tarot cards because I feel they can help give guidance through Native American symbolism and wisdom. You will have to deeply read the book about the meaning of each card and consider it before deciding what it means to you. I think that the fact it requires thought and meditation to actually see meaning is a good thing, as opposed to a cookie cutter or fortune cookie approach. I also like that these tarot cards don't have an occult association with them. They are more based on Mother Earth, tribal and natural symbols and associations. I have enjoyed using them and I think they help me give insight into some situations. Power Path to Love.

-- Dr. Jane Branam, Amazon customer


This is the first deck with which I learned to do readings -- and it is still my deck of choice. The meanings and illustrations provide more room for intuition and personal interpretation than traditional decks. It also gives Native American views, teachings, and history. If you feel drawn to the Native American way of life (Shamanism, animal teachings, etc) or are looking for other interpretations for traditional tarot cards, this is the deck for you.

-- Sam, Amazon customer

$21.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Shaman Wisdom Cards
Shaman Wisdom Cards

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT SHAMAN WISDOM CARDS:

I feel that these cards have great power. Used with humility and respect, they can be a true tool of empowerment and transformation.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


The Shaman Wisdom cards, by Leita Richesson are, by far, the best divination deck I have ever used. The cards are uncannily accurate and address the question/concern in a healing way, not just matter-of-factly. The cards also help the querent to grow through personal transformation.

The deck is not based on the Tarot. Instead, it is numbered and divided into trees, moons (astrological signs), stones, plants, animals and directions. It's based on the Native American Shaman construct. There are 65 cards and an optional prayer to recite before starting. The enclosed pamphlet includes innovative spreads including the two-card Pole Spread, the three-card War Path Spread, and my favorite, the three-card Sacred Path spread. I find the deck very adaptable to innovation and I have successfully used spontaneous spreads.

I was amazed to find that the number correlation of the cards had an easily discernable significance. At least for me, it was easier with this deck, as opposed to the Cartouche or Daughters of the Moon (two of my favorite decks).

The deck itself is very soothing. The cards are a light Earth color with a Native American motif border and a picture of the object done in muted colors. You can easily slip into a light meditation just by shuffling the deck!

The message of each card is multi-dimensional. The layered meanings relate to your "medicine" or blessing/lesson of the card, the element's traditional usage, and advice or warning. The reader is discouraged from engaging an "ill-dignified" approach to an upside down card. Each card is feminine or masculine, has a direction, an element and a planet. But some also have a chakra, some have two directions, and some are both masculine and feminine. The other wonderful thing about this deck is that it can be used as a learning tool for those unfamiliar with Native American cosmology. I have been using the card a day method and learned a lot about myself, Native American cosmology, and shamanism. This deck has an amazing vibration. It's as though there's a luscious mellow aura surrounding the cards. In summary, this is a very spiritual deck that is truly special!

$21.95
Spiral Tarot
Spiral Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE SPIRAL TAROT:

The Spiral Tarot was my second tarot deck. I saw a few sample images online, and fell in love with the beauty of it. One of the problems I came across in learning the Tarot was that many of the decks available have very repetitive minor arcana cards. You might as well use a regular deck of playing cards. This is not so with the Spiral Tarot. Every single card of this deck, especially the Minor Arcana, tells a story. These cards will speak to you. Compare this deck to most and you will see that the artist actually took the time to artistically represent a situation to convey the meaning of the card to you. The colors are beautiful, the art is very well-drawn, meanings easily interpreted through the pictures.

-- Raven on Aeclectic Tarot


Though there are several decks I really love, this one is now my favorite Tarot deck, as it brings together many elements that are important to me. The deck is lusciously vibrant with rich color. Dark blue and also a lighter blue are predominant colors, carrying the background of the whole deck, which I think gives the entire deck a "Lunar" quality which supports our intuition and Lunar or Moon knowledge and abilities. Then too, Carl Jung knew the importance of bright color, how it attracts the unconscious, and I believe that the ability to work intuitively with a deck is enhanced when it has both rich colors and appropriate symbolic depth. The Major Arcana cards on this deck show the Kabbalah correspondences, depicting the Hebrew letters corresponding to the trumps, as well as depicting the particular Sephiroth on the Tree of Life. I have always felt disappointed with the Rider Waite deck, which, though it is hailed for its "correct" hermetic symbolism, to me is far too plain, even banal, in its color. The images of the Spiral Tarot, particularly the trumps but also the Minor Arcana, are more complex, saturated, dreamy and engaging, and I think that helps to feel energetically pulled in towards the cards, when you feel like you wouldn't mind walking right into that scene and being there to fully feel it. The Spiral Tarot sticks close to traditional depictions of the trumps and Minor Arcana, but renders them more compellingly.

-- D. Riverblue Cloudwalker on Amazon

$21.95
Hermetic Tarot Deck
Hermetic Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT HERMETIC TAROT DECK:

This black & white Tarot is unsurpassed as a study deck or teaching deck. It empowers the reader to make full use of all aspects of interpretation at a glance. QUALITIES OF ASTROLOGY This deck is one of the few that easily reveals the planetary influences at work in a matter, or the overall spread and thus lends itself to shades of meaning relevant to the seeker's own elemental nature and birth sign. Each card is visually identified with corresponding planets, aspects, and elements. These qualities alone improve the student's ability to grasp the possibility of deeper levels of understanding in the book of Tarot ... and to expand the readers' scope of divination. QUALITIES OF IMAGERY The symbolism used is powerful and intricate ... a review of any Major Arcana reveals many influences at work. Further, the imagery is intriguing, drawing the eye and the mind into infinite possibility and facilitating psychic placement in the vast expanse of the Astral. The imagery in the Hermetic Tarot facilitates study of the Tree of Life and the Cabalistic perspective. Concepts of Force, Form and Equilibrium are graphically depicted. The Hebrew letter associated with the Major Arcana is clearly visible on each card. The names of the angels of the decans of the heavens by day and by night are included on all the Minor Arcana. Cabalistic and Hermetic symbols that lead one into deeper understanding of the Tree of Life and the Golden Dawn appear on many Tarot. This is one of the few decks that offers two male and two female images in the Court card, in keeping with the balanced view of reality offered by the Tree of Life model. QUALITIES OF INSTRUCTIONAL BOOKLET With constant referrals to SEPHIRAH on the Tree of Life, this booklet makes it clear that the study of Tarot is a deeply spiritual process. Terse, yet thorough, each card is clearly described. Reference to the interpretation of the symbols used is clear. Interpretations of the cards are given as "Dignified" and "Ill-dignified", which in my opinion is far more freeing to the reader than the standard "Reversed" interpretations given by so many decks. Reference is made to the Four Worlds, and the Paths of the Tree of Life in the instructional booklet ... leading the student to a deeper consideration of the expansive nature of accurate interpretation. The cards are printed on sturdy stock, and have born up well after 3 years of regular use. They are of normal size, which make shuffling easy, and it is easy to determine both suit and number of each. I highly recommend this deck to all students of Tarot and use it consistently in all Workshops offered at the Studio.

-- Ann George, Aeclectic Tarot


This is, without question, one of the most beautiful and intricately illustrated decks I've ever encountered. What's more, it is an excellent tool for learning Hermetics and moreover expresses the planetary and zodiacal associations with particular cards and in many cases provides the Hebrew numbers and name translations. The cards reference Kabbalistic elements and in some cases, geomantic patterns. There is a great deal to be gleaned from this deck, as it is not "simplified" and thoroughly challenges the novice to become well versed in Hermetics.

-- "Apocryphal Raven", on Amazon.com


Complex and stark, the black-and-white images are jam-packed with alchemical, astrological and Qabalistic symbols easily recognized by those familiar with those and other esoteric systems. Revealing many of the workings of the Secret Order of the Golden Dawn, this deck draws heavily upon the work of Mathers, Crowley, Case, Levi and others.

The Hermetic Tarot comes with a 70-page LWB, which is thicker than most, which details astrological attributions for the cards and the numerological correlations of the Minor Arcana with the Tree of Life. The LWB also has a handy chart of elemental and astrological glyphs, as well as an illustration of the Tree of Life. However, Hebrew letters rather than actual card names depict the paths on the Tree.

If you're looking to enhance your magical practice or further your knowledge of Golden Dawn esotericism and Qabalistic associations, this would make a fine deck for your studies. The intricacies of the Hermetic Tarot almost serve as a meditative scrying mirror -- and if you enjoy the art of M.C. Escher, you may very well feel an affinity for this deck.

-- Janet Boyer, author of Back in Time Tarot


Though the pictorial symbols on these cards may not be the most colorful, the images hail to ancient Gnosticism and all the mysteries that have tormented the minds of men since the dawn of time. These cards house a myriad of symbolic keys which allows just as many interpretations; lending themselves perfectly to divination, since one truly reads the cards from the soul. These mixed and varied symbols allow the reader to draw inspiration from any number of religious schools of thought, the very fact that attracted me to purchase this deck. I am most highly joyed by the fact that these cards are now in my life.

-- Alvin Dale Green "Tarot Gnostic"

$21.95
Crystal Visions Tarot
Crystal Visions Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CRYSTAL VISIONS TAROT:

When you open up the Crystal Visions Tarot by fantasy artist Jennifer Galasso, you are entering a different world -- a colorful one filled with crystals, fairies, animals and mystical figures. The artist was inspired by Stevie Nicks' latest CD "Crystal Visions" as well as her interest in crystal balls.

I was enchanted with the vibrant images right away. The artist's color choices are bold and bright yet still ethereal. Purples, scarlet reds, deep indigos and lush greens make this deck a visual feast for the eyes. While the art is fantasy based, it manages to steer away from being too cheesy. Although some of the figures were a bit cartoonish, overall the look is whimsical, romantic and mythical. Based on the standard Rider Waite Smith system, this deck stays almost true to the tradition -- there is an additional card in the deck, giving you 79 cards rather than 78. This extra card is called "The Unknown Card" and when it lands in a reading, it represents something that is "not yet meant to be revealed". The usual Majors are featured and the suits are traditional Cups, Wands, Swords and Pentacles. Court cards are Kings, Queens, Knights and Pages.

Different flowers and animals represent each suit:
Cups: emotions -- water lilies and dragon flies
Swords: intellect and conflict -- ravens and winged creatures
Pentacles: material things and money -- crystals, fruitful trees, wildlife
Wands: creativity -- candles, sprites, dragons

While I enjoyed the art in the Minors, the Majors are the standout part of this deck. My favorites were the Hierophant with the pope sitting on a throne in front of a stained glass window adorned with different religious symbols; the eerie Death card with a ghostly figure standing above a seemingly dead female on a headstone; the mighty Emperor with his ram's mask and The Devil with a playful Pan like figure in the background trying to entice a naked woman who lounging by a tree with an apple in her hand (who is tempting who?) I would recommend this deck to any tarot collector, any fans of fantasy art, younger readers or beginners, as well as anyone who enjoys crystals and faeries. There are no really creepy images, making this deck appropriate for everyone. Two Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady


If you like fantasy art, (and who doesn't?) this deck is a must have for all Tarot deck collectors and readers. It's beautifully illustrated, full of symbology, and evocative. Based on the traditional structure of the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) system of a 78 card deck, you will find the familiar names of the Major Arcana, the Court, and the suits: Wands, Cups, Pentacles, Swords. Included is an added bonus, The Unknown Card. The images are clear in their detail and of sufficient size to see them clearly, and surrounded by a narrow white border. The backs are reversible with a large opalescent sphere in the center which is surrounded by a filigree of rose vines and gems. A pentacle rests in each corner, while a chalice sits in the center at top and bottom.

This beautiful deck would be appropriate for beginners to more advanced readers. I believe I will be spending many delighted hours now and in the future, working with this deck. I’m sure clients will find it as pleasing, if not more so, as I do. If you happen to be on the fence about purchasing this deck, I would recommend it for either yourself or as a gift. It's a win-win!

-- Koneta Bailey, New Paths Tarot


Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to the classic Rider-Waite 78-card system in much of its symbolism, as well as in card and suit names. The luscious card imagery also illustrates the elemental aspects of each suit in order to aid the novice in forming associations with the cards. The Crystal Visions Tarot deck includes 78 cards with an additional unknown card for gazing into future situations that have not yet been revealed, or for exploring issues with deeper insight. The instruction booklet offers both upright and reversed meanings.

The LWB provides an Introduction to the deck along with descriptions and divinatory meanings for each card, including meanings for reversed cards. I am impressed with the amount and value of the material in this LWB. We are given the usual DMs but we are also given insight into the reasoning behind the depiction of the characters on the cards. For example, the description of The World includes: "The characters depicted in this card sits on top of the world in the lotus pose. She appears to be meditating, listening to the hum of the universe. She wears a necklace with the Hindu symbol 'Om' symbolizing the most perfect integration of mind, body and spirit."

The colors on these cards are soft yet vivid. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel. The characters primarily consist of broad-shouldered, well-proportioned men and beautiful, slender women with long, flowing hair. These ethereal images are pleasing to the eye in both color and style. Each suit has its own consistent color scheme, inspired by the element associated with that suit. The Cups cards feature violet and magenta backgrounds; the card titles are black on a pinky lavender bar. Swords cards are indigo and lavender, with the titles written on a lavender-blue bar. Pentacles cards are shades of green and brown, with the titles written on a pale olive-green bar. Wands cards are orange-red and maroon, with the titles written on what I would call a rosy beige bar. The artist's "cool" and "warm" palettes make it easy to recognize the elemental associations in any given spread.

The symbolism on the cards also ties in nicely with elemental associations. For example, the moon appears in in various phases on all of the Cups (Water) cards. Lions and dragons appear on many of the Wands (Fire) cards. Birds or butterflies appear on most of the Swords (Air) cards. Trees and plants dominate the scenes on the Pentacles (Earth) cards.

This deck is likely to appeal to readers who prefer traditional RWS titles and symbolism, but also like to work with cards that feature romantic, fantasy-style art suggestive of the Faerie realm. The level of detail in the images encourages closer study of the cards, yet is not overwhelming. Although the characters are not people you are likely to see in your everyday life, many of them are approachable and engaging. The Unknown Card may not appeal to everyone, but you don't have to use it if you don't like it. I recommend meditating on The Unknown Card before shuffling and drawing cards from this deck for the reading.

-- Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


When I saw images of the Crystal Visions Tarot deck online, I thought it was very pretty, but I just didn't realize how beautiful these cards actually were until I bought them and held them in my hands. For many decks, sample images don't truly do a deck justice, and this one is no exception. Having these cards in my hands to shuffle and read with on an up-close-and-personal basis allowed me to quickly connect -- and to classify this deck among my favorites!

I love the feminine feel of this deck. The imagery is beautiful with rich tones that speak to me on an emotional level. And for those who prefer the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) style of Tarot, the symbolism of the Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to tradition -- from the titles and ordering of the Major Arcana Cards (with Strength as #8 and Justice as #11) ... to the suit names: Cups, Swords, Pentacles, and Wands ... to the traditional court card names: Page, Knight, Queen, and King. while the deck is beautiful to look at, it also renders such beautiful and meaningful energy in reading the cards. As mentioned, this deck really speaks to me on an emotional level. In fact, I quickly made friends with the Crystal Visions Tarot. Doing my first reading with this deck of cards was like connecting with a dear and trusted friend -- even though the cards and I just met during the first week of January 2012. What a lovely way to start my new year in the world of Tarot!

If you are familiar with a RWS deck, you can read the Crystal Visions Tarot straight out of the box with the understanding that there is that extra card in this deck. But for those who are new to the Tarot, I like the way the author and artist has written the 63-page accompanying booklet. It's far better than most LWB's available for a deck. I feel that even a beginner to Tarot could successfully learn Tarot with this deck and the proper books for learning this subject.

A fascinating thing I noticed in this deck is that for the cards that can signify change or rebirth on some level, there are butterflies as part of the symbolism for those cards. In the description of the High Priestess card above, the author tells us that butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and eternal life. I definitely agree, and I would add to that description that butterflies are a symbol of change. Butterflies can show us a "lighter" side of a situation, or can show how thought transforms or changes one's understanding of life and circumstances.

This is a deck that I plan to use frequently since it feels as comfortable to me as the RWS traditional tarot deck, and thus I appreciate the fact that a quality cardstock has been used for this deck. The quality cardstock will allow the Crystal Visions Tarot to stand the test of time with heavy usage.

While I noted that this deck has a feminine feel to me, there are still plenty of male characters contained within the cards. A third of the deck does feature men in the imagery. So it's not a gender biased deck. It just has a soft, gentle, nurturing, and feminine feeling for me. Of course, I don't want to leave you with the impression that this deck is filled with fluff and can't tell it like it is. It definitely can tell the tale of a difficult and challenging story in your life, but at the same time, it's like having a friend by your side who will offer comfort, support, and guidance to get through whatever you're going through. This is the kind of gentle strength that offers empowerment.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone who enjoys the RWS tarot decks, to those who want a gentle deck that has a softer approach (yet still powerful!), and even for those who are just starting with the Tarot. The Crystal Visions Tarot follows RWS tradition in a way that doesn't clone or copy the familiar and well-loved kind of traditional tarot deck, but is still similar enough to immediately resonate with. Collectors will also want to get a copy of this deck, too.

-- Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


To call a tarot deck "different" is definitely vague. The Crystal Visions Tarot is different from many tarot decks I have come across. The cards reflect Galasso’s fantasy style, so those who enjoy fantasy-themed decks will surely like this one. Most of the characters on the cards are women, which is a change from many more traditional tarot decks. Similar to the back, the cards are colored in mostly soft pinks and purples. Each card has a colored rectangle at the bottom with the name of the card, and the background color changes depending on the suit of the card, which is great for the reader. The card backs are simple yet complex, with pentacles in each corner and a circle in the center adorned with flowers. A chalice adorns the center of the long ends of the card. The entire back color is muted and soft, pleasing to the eye and drawing you in. The cards are shiny but not slippery. From an imagery perspective, the deck has some similarities to standard RWS symbols, but it is far from a clone. The Fool in this deck walks off a cliff, but instead of a dog she is accompanied by a number of butterflies.

Galasso's attention to detail is impressive -- the Ace of Cups is one of the most beautiful cards I have ever seen in a tarot deck. One interesting fact is the many of the cards have some kind of reference to air -- a dragonfly, fairy, butterfly, or other winged creature -- which is something you don't often see in tarot decks. I especially liked the Death card, which has Death holding a staff topped with an ankh and the inscription VITA MUTATUR NON TOLLITUR (Life is changed, not taken away) on a tomb. Butterflies reinforce the overall transformation feel of the card. It softened the card but rendered it neither foolish nor powerless, which is a fine line to walk.

This deck also features an additional card, bringing the total number of cards to 79. "The Unknown Card" is explained as an area of the reading which requires further examination -- like a past event, for example -- or that additional steps need to be taken to clarify the bigger picture. I'm not a big fan of extra cards in tarot decks, especially with vague descriptions, so likely I'd use the deck without this one.

While I'm not a fan of reading with fantasy decks generally speaking, I intend to give this one a try. I think my clients will like it, and I know I'll enjoy reading with it, especially when I need a change from RWS clone decks and I'd like something soft yet powerful.

-- John Marani, in ATA Quarterly Journal


The first thing to note about this deck is the beautiful use of color in each card. A major strength of this deck is its ability to create a mood or feeling with each card by such masterful use of color. In the author's own words, the cards have a "vibrant and consistent color scheme, in order to be easily recognizable within a spread."

The artist has consistently portrayed each suit experience through specific colors, crystals, people and other beings. She also assigns elements to each of the four suits in the LWB. The world and its artwork are largely influenced by her work as a fantasy artist and illustrator.

Coins -- the scenes take place in and around tress, lots of greens and yellows, crystals and earth spirits.

Cups -- all scenes take place in same locale and include water lilies, dragonflies, the moon in its different phases, pinks and reddish purples.

Wands -- features lions, unicorns, horses, mountainous terrain and lots of red.

Swords -- the scenes are bleak, cold and snowy with nurds and other winged characters.

One particularly striking card for me is the 4 of Swords. A woman lies at rest on her back in snow that almost covers her, and her arms are crossed as if keeping her only slightly warm. Swords, roses and petals are strewn on the snow around her, and the whole scene is viewed from directly above her. While her face is expressionless, the image itself is felt at first glance. In readings I have found that the characters' faces and eyes do not communicate nearly so much as do the gestalt of colors, symbols and flow of details in each card image. Messages with this deck seem to be toned down in an almost introverted style for a nice and gentle read, much like getting advice from a dreamy friend who, even in anger or elation, remains subdued and calm.

-- John Alan, on Tarot Guild


I love the colors and sense of grace in this deck. The intention with this deck was to create art that was unique, but that would be close enough to traditional imagery to allow new readers to learn the Tarot easily. This is a traditional 78 card deck with one additional card in the Major Arcana, entitled the Unknown Card. It represents an answer that is not yet ready to be revealed. I love decks with an extra card like this”! The Unknown Card can refer to something from the past, or something that is going to happen in the future. The area that this card falls in indicates where steps need to be taken to clarify the big picture. There is also a hint to move forward with an open mind, leaving all bias behind. I loved this card before I even knew what it represented -- my thought was "Yes! Another deck with a card that is 'gifted'!" What an incredible card, with the female figure holding a crystal ball in her left hand. In front of her we see the shadow of an owl. Her whole body posture invites the Seeker to peer into the crystal ball! The artwork is done in a fantasy style, using reds, greens, lavender, and dark brown predominately. There is a sense of gentleness and "otherworldliness" that draws one in, and makes one feel right at home.

This is one deck that if I had my way, I would talk about each and every card! However, that is not allowed, so we will look at the cards that pulled me in the strongest. One of my birth cards is the Hermit, so that is one card that I look at in every deck. If there was a make or break card for me, this would be it. Here we see a lone figure, in a lavender robe, sitting atop a mountain, with a lamp in their left hand. They face the right hand side of the card, generally considered to represent the future. To me, they appear very wistful. The Empress stands in the middle of a garden, wearing a bright red dress, and carrying a triskele scepter in her right hand. She holds a heart-shaped charm. Lush greenery is behind her, as well as a tree with bright green foliage and ripe red fruit. In the upper right hand corner of the card we see beautiful butterflies.

The Lovers shows a man and a woman embracing, with flowers in the right and left hand lower corners. The figures are bound by ties held by two doves.

The Ten of Swords in this deck is one of the least scary, but saddest, images of this card that I have seen in any deck. A female figure is face down in the snow, bloody, with ten swords in her back. She is surrounded by snow and barren trees. The clouds in the sky behind her are attempting to part, indicating that there is hope.

The Eight of Pentacles shows a female figure, standing at her spinning wheel, paying ardent attention to her work. I like this card because she is working outside, with greenery surrounding her and a tree behind her.

The Fool in this deck just carries incredible energy! The figure is a female, with dark, flowing hair. She stands on a precipice, one foot on land and one in the air. There is a trail of butterflies in the air to her right.

I found this deck very easy to read with, and feel that it would be a great deck to offer clients as a choice for their readings. The art alone is gorgeous, and the additional card (the Unknown Card) opens up new avenues for reading. It could simply be taken out of the deck if the reader preferred not to use it.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I felt compelled to look through the cards a second time, and a third. Each time I did, I saw something I hadn't noticed before. There are figures of people in the twisted tree branches, and delicate angels in the clouds. The lush flowers and trees have lovely texture, as do the brilliantly colored dragons. The skies and landscapes are evocative. When I looked closely at each card, I realized this isn't a trite deck. I felt like an old woman who has mistakenly assumed a young, pretty girl to be shallow and stupid. Crystal Visions Tarot is true to Rider Waite Smith structure and interpretation. In many cards, the subtle symbolism honors a wealth of tarot tradition, often in clever ways.

It would take a long time to describe all the cards I love in this deck. They include the Fool, who is female. Butterflies, appropriate for the air correspondence of this card, also surround her. Her dress has red ribbons, one of which has casually wrapped around her leg, giving her the ancient tradition of the Fool's red-striped legs. In the World card we see a large lotus flower cradling a globe on which sits a woman in lotus position. More butterflies here, not elementally appropriate, but acceptable, because they are flying out of her palm chakras. As I mentioned earlier, I question the addition of a seventy-ninth card, entitled The Unknown Card. This card says that the answer is, at present, unknowable. Perhaps we need to look within and find the answer in our own heart. The card is actually quite lovely. It shows a modern Goth-looking young Pagan woman holding a crystal ball. The image is rather different from the rest of the deck. It stands out as a special card, belonging to none of the suits. It is a legitimate tradition in random token divination to use a blank token. It makes sense for Galasso to offer us this option.

That I have already started using Crystal Visions Tarot for professional readings is the highest praise I could give any tarot deck. However, I was initially unsure if I wanted to use the Unknown Card, or use my prerogative to remove it. So far, I have left it in the deck. I must admit, it pops up at very appropriate times.

It has been a while since I've discovered a new deck to add to my short list of professional reading decks. Crystal Visions Tarot is attractive, evocative and easy to understand. Unlike many fantasy art tarot decks, its images are uncomplicated and traditional. Do not be fooled by its youthful energy, Crystal Visions Tarot will give great wisdom and depth. It will be a solid learning and reading deck for anyone from beginners to seasoned professionals.

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


Fantasy artist Galasso has transformed classic tarot imagery into a vibrant tour, through a crystal ball, into a magical world filled with fairies, fantastical creatures, and exotic flowers. Color creates the backdrop against which the story of each card is told. Lyrical and mysterious, the illustrations almost sing.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
Kuan Yin Oracle
Kuan Yin Oracle

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT KUAN YIN ORACLE

The Kuan Yn is a gorgeous new deck illustrated by Zeng Hao, with the accompanying book written by Alana Fairchild. This beautiful collaboration resulted in a deck and book set that is as lovely a treat on the eyes as it is for the spirit.

The cards are all so beautiful, elegant, graceful, peaceful and feminine.  My favorite card is the Lotus Throne (above). When I saw the image of this card online, I had to have this deck. It is beyond gorgeous. I want to be her.

I was blown away with how accurately this deck matched my daily life experiences. For a couple weeks, I pulled a single daily card, and it never failed to align, with minute detail, with what was going on for me that day. The deck reads very gracefully, and the spiritual messages are gentle and empowering. The cards, gorgeous as they are, don't lend themselves to intuitive readings on their own, as they are all very alike. So the book is invaluable for this deck to work its magic. You really do need to learn the meaning behind each card.

This deck has not failed to give me the exact message I need to hear on any given day. Every time I draw a card, I am amazed at how it seems to be written just for me. It has been like having a divine friend with me, knowing exactly where I am and where I want to go and what I need to do, guiding and encouraging me along the way.

The 144-page book that accompanies this deck is wonderful. Alana Fairchild has a lovely voice, and was the perfect author for this set. The author's voice is so comforting, it's as though she channeled Kuan Yin's compassionate and loving spirit while writing the book. The passages guide you lovingly through the difficult times as well as the blessed. You can really feel the divine energy coming through her words. When you read the message, you feel loved, which is an amazing testimony to the power of the author's voice.

I love this deck! Both the cards and the book simply exude positive feminine energy. The images are exquisite, and the book is marvelous. If you are looking for a deck that will channel the Divine Feminine, look no further.  It's been a really beautiful experience working with these cards and book... it's a set I will cherish.

—Kiki, Tarot Dame Blogspot


Back around July of 2010, I had won an oracle reading at a local health and wellness open house, which I went to and was quite impressed by what I learned about myself and my life's journey. Ironically, at that same reading is when I fell head-over-heels with the specific oracle deck the woman used to read me. I had been following this particular oracle and its author since it was published and to say smitten would be a gross understatement!

The oracle deck boasts 44 incredibly beautiful, intricately detailed and soul capturing cards and comes with a 144-page guide book that explains a little about each card in the deck. Each page also provides meditations, prayers and exercises you can do to help connect with your inner peace, beauty, and awareness.

Kuan Yin IS after all, the goddess of compassion guiding us to love ourselves and reach the Divine Feminine.

Aside from the breathtaking artwork, the thing I really liked about this deck is its size; the cards are larger, which is what I prefer when reading myself or others.  I'm so excited to break this deck in and see what advice and insight Kuan Yin and the Divine Feminine have for me :)

—Kayla, The Eclectic Element

$23.95
Magician Magnet Set
Magician Magnet Set

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MAGICIAN MAGNET SET

The Magician Tarot Magnets are a beautiful assortment of magnets by U.S. Games Systems.  The Magician cards from six of the best tarot decks, both classic and contemporary are a part of this special collection of Tarot Magnets. Measuring 1.25” X 2.25” each.  I love the Magician and now I can show him off and remind myself of the powerful message within the secret symbolism of this card.  These colorful magnets are simply delightful, perfect for the frig or file cabinet ... willing to inspire you throughout the day to manifest your desires.  This pack of six magnets is priced at only  $5 but is  well worth over $15.00.  These would make a fantastic gift!  

—An Angel's Kiss blog
 
Lynn Araujo
Director of Communications
U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
203 353 8400 Ex 322
$2.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Book
Deviant Moon Tarot Book

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT BOOK

I’ve used the Deviant Moon Tarot deck, both with and without borders, for the better part of seven years. When it first came out I had questions about some of the minutiae in the imagery. So I corresponded with Patrick Valenza. I was surprised with his willingness to share portions of the story with me and fascinated with what he shared with me.

Those early conversations with Patrick revealed that this was not a deck rushed to market like so many other decks these days, and I was left wanting to know more about how the drawings matured. 

Then I began to hear rumors about a book.

On Christmas Eve, the postman dropped off a package. Upon opening it my first thought was, “When US Games Systems does something, they do it right”. It is a stunning book. It’s beautiful. The hardback full-color embossed cover, the weight of the paper – it is a four pound, three hundred forty page adventure for your eyes and mind.

This is the new standard in tarot companion books, and like the deck, it was not rushed to market. You can tell that it was created with love.

This is not just a book that’s about a deck. It is a book that demonstrates the evolution of the Art and the Artist, and it takes us on that evolutionary journey.

This is a book for art students and artists who will appreciate and grow from the shared journey. This is a book for people who would like to understand the dark and the fantastic.

This is a book for people who love the Deviant Moon Tarot, want to see what’s behind the curtain, and have the rest of the story revealed.

Patrick joyfully recounts his creation process, and how his organic and narrative approach to art is the result of thirty years development. He shows us his edits, the images rejected, and entertains us with the stories of creation.

Please don’t clear off a spot on your bookshelf for this book as it won’t be there collecting dust. Its beauty and the heirloom quality of its content will be appreciated time and time again when left out in the open to enjoy and inspire.

—Dan Pelletier, Tarot Garden


It’s almost inevitable that everyone who has ever purchased Patrick Valenza’s game-changing Deviant Moon tarot has said, or heard it uttered: “so where’s the companion book?”

Since its launch in 2008, the Deviant Moon has been one of the most talked-about decks of modern times, as fans endlessly pore over its haunting, marionette-like figures. What do the half-awake, half-dreaming faces mean? And what about the digital textures used throughout?

Deviant Moon fans so far have had to rely on the small booklet supplied with the deck, supplemented by snippets from Patrick himself, who’s a warm and endlessly generous figure on social media. He has long indicated that the deck features details lifted from gravestones and abandoned buildings throughout Long Island and Brooklyn. Fans also know that Patrick was born with an unusually precocious artistic gift, and began preliminary work on the Deviant Moon as a young teenager – but it’s only with the publication of this book that we finally get the whole story.

And what a book it is: weighing in at more than four pounds and nearly three years in the making, U.S. Games and Patrick have teamed up to create not an average tarot how-to, but a vast and sumptuous art book.

It’s sheer size is the first thing that strikes you. This is not a book you’ll slip into a small bag: it’s hefty. But once you’ve got over that, you delve in and immediately realise that size isn’t the only thing that’s supersized here: everything about this book is turned up to 11, to quote from the immortal This is Spinal Tap.

Every card in the deck is rendered in rich colour at full-page size, which in itself is an incredible treat for Deviant Moon fans. The cards aren’t small by any means, but the sheer amount of detail they contain means that sometimes, seeing them bigger really is better. Just exploring the images at such a size, and so beautifully printed, is a wonder. But what really gives this book depth, authenticity and meaning, is the backstory Patrick shares with us.

It turns out that you can’t tell the story of the Deviant Moon without telling the life of Patrick Valenza, and vice versa. The two are irrevocably intertwined, and so to understand the deck’s genesis, we also need to see some of Patrick’s earliest childhood art, charting its development into the genius we see today. As well as childhood art, the book also reveals unseen character sketches, alternative card ideas that didn’t make the cut, and of course, the buildings and gravestones whose images and textures pepper the deck.

As you’d expect, both upright and reversed meanings are given for each card, but there’s so much more. In addition, you might learn about how an image was inspired by a childhood dream, how a card was assembled from images of pieces of metal, how Major Arcana figures can be found in childhood form in the Minors and of course, learn about the legendary chess set Patrick created just for the Ten of Pentacles.

If you’re a confirmed Deviant Moon fan, you might think you already know a lot about this deck, but trust me – there’s far, far more to learn. If the deck is totally new to you, then investing in this book, along with a set of the cards, will see you on a journey of discovery that’s bound to bring you delight for years to come. It’s so much more than ‘just’ a book: this is a tangible labour of love into which the author has poured his heart and soul, not to mention decades of work. For its part, U.S. Games has done a fantastic job as publisher in backing Patrick’s creative vision and by justifying every penny you’ll spend on this book.

It might be more than a tad unwieldy, but this is every inch a luxury, heirloom publication, from the crackle-glaze cover to the brilliant, fake-advert endpapers and above all, the quality of the paper stock and the printing. Every character from the Deviant Moon comes alive with colour and as a fan you can spend hours absorbed, not just in the book, but in the brilliantly-realised esoteric universe Patrick has created.

The saying goes that good things come to those who wait – and this is so much more than a good thing. It’s a unique, beautiful and important thing, epitomising what can be achieved when a creative genius with a truly unique idea is given the time and space to express that idea by a supportive publisher.

—Kate Large, Editor-in-Chief, Pagan Dawn Magazine


There is something about a book that is magical and timeless. Its ability to transport us to different times and places, or into the mind perspective and imagination of another person is nothing short of miraculous. And yet still, there are some books that are further set apart from the others by their dazzling, memorable magic and unforgettable journeys.

The Deviant Moon Tarot is an absolutely decadent dessert full of succulently sinful wonders. And for all its richness, it won't make your waist any thicker, though it will brighten dark corners of your day and satiate your appetite for more. If you have fallen in love with the Deviant Moon Tarot, the book about the deck is an absolute must-have that will add much insight to the details in your deck.

The cover has an embossed glossy sheen and a slightly raised texture when one's fingers are brushed across its cover. You will be tempted to massage the cover as I was. When you move the book in the light, moonlight dances across the raised embossing and shards of light glint off the gold and silver embellishments. The inside covers of this book features an aged, rustic newsprint-look. Several hilarious spoofs of advertisements feature Valenza's curious crew of caricatures. The paper quality of this book's pages is exquisite, smooth like cream, with a rich, clear sheen to the ink. The pages are not pure white, but instead have a faint digital texture that resembles parchment paper. This is a high quality book through and through.

This book's content is centered around Valenza's actual creation of the Deviant Moon Tarot deck, how it was created and how to read it. You'll enter the mind of the author and go on a wild ride of beings that reside on the side of dreams. Valenza's well-loved tarot deck is one of the most popular modern decks available today.

Through this book, you'll learn about the birth of the unique characters in the deck, many by happy accidents and others through very conscious shifting of designs. He also describes pieces and items found within the cards that add to meanings. I was surprised to learn that he would often craft clay items of things found in his deck to assist in his drawing process, and photographs of these crafts are included.  

The book explains in delightful detail how each card image was inspired, and this is where I found the true magic unfold. Many of the images originated when Valenza was just a boy and he includes photographic images of his original childhood sketches along with images of the structures that created the textures he used in the cards. Valenza includes a generous section for every card about both upright as well as reversed meanings. Readers will find the depth of this information invaluable to their readings.

The Major and Minor Arcana cards are treated with equal weight with the generous portions of information provided. Want more? Every card explanation is accompanied by a gorgeous, large, full-page and full-color image of each card in the deck, larger than life and with astounding color, textures and details. You'll see things in this book that didn't make it into the deck: a peek backstage! These gorgeous images surpass even the beauty of the images in his deck because with the increased size is increased clarity and detail.

This book would make a wonderful gift (even to oneself!) and it makes a strikingly proud and intriguing display on a coffee table. It can be read in long bouts of book binges, or in short spurts of daily breaks. I read it behaving much like I do when I'm starved for a good meal and I can't decide whether to wolf it down as fast as possible or to enjoy every delectable microsecond of its delicacy in slow motion. I was constantly torn between the impulse to binge and the realization that there were thousands of textures, tastes and details to focus on...my heart definitely started to beat faster with great glee as I turned the pages.

—Donnaleigh de LaRose, Beyond Worlds Tarot podcast

$39.95
Fairy Tale Lenormand
Fairy Tale Lenormand

WHAT READERS ARE SAYING ABOUT FAIRY TALE LENORMAND

I have had the pleasure, the last few days of working with this sweet treasure of a Lenormand, the Fairy Tale Lenormand by Lisa Hunt and Arwen Lynch Poe. The cards come in a little tin, which is pure brilliance on the part of U.S. Games Systems. I adore the tin, and it will last forever. Cardboard cannot compare. The deck is a standard 36-card Lenormand format with an extra lady and gentleman card bringing the total cards to 38. The card stock and texture is perfect. I would not expect anything less from this publisher.



The artwork is classic Lisa Hunt; devastatingly sweet and detailed. Somehow the Lenormand size does not detract from the art at all. You can see every exquisite detail. I could just live in these cards forever. I don't want to put them down.



I know the purpose of the deck is divination, but take out each card, one by one and read the story that accompanies it in the little guidebook and you are immediately transported back to childhood days and fairy tale fantasies. This guide is well written and compelling. You will read it because it's delightful, not because it's necessary. I love everything about this deck and I can't say enough wonderful things about it. End note: considering how collectible Lisa Hunt's Fairy Tale Tarot has become, I would suggest buying at least two copies of this deck.

—Jill Scott, author of Tarot by Number


To ask Lisa Hunt to illustrate a traditional Lenormand deck was really throwing down the gauntlet. Yet, once again, she rose to the challenge, with a wink and a nod, and created a deck that appears straightforward enough to satisfy the most demanding traditional cartomancer, but also contains the tiny embedded symbolism her loyal fans look forward to.



Lenormand is not tarot. It is meant to be read precisely based on the predominant symbolism and the placement of cards. Ms. Hunt’s drawings meet that criteria nicely. Those who choose to look closer, however, will find that the lady in Clover seems to have a blissful secret the rest of us cannot see. Then there’s Tree. Of course, we expect the face emerging from the trunk, but what about those roots reaching out like octopus arms to grasp the ground.



Arwen Lynch does a superb job of linking the appropriate Fairy Tale to each card and explaining how the archetypes in the tale lend themselves to the Lenormand symbolism. This is a lyrical and captivating addition to the Lenormand library. Contained in a beautifully designed metal box, it’s a special treat for card lovers and the people who love us.

—Anna Jedrziewski, TarotWise.com

$18.95