U.S. Games Systems, Inc   Tarot & Inspiration

Tarot & Inspiration

 per page
Connolly Tarot
Connolly Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CONNOLLY TAROT:

Aside from the positive viewpoint of the cards the colors are beautiful and are great for meditation. In fact, there is an extra card showing a doorway called the doorway to meditation. For anyone with a lively colorful and positive outlook then I think these cards will speak to you. They are not too far different from the standard packs, that a beginner wouldn't be able to decipher them yet they are easier to interpret generally as the images are easier to relate to. I've only had the pack 2 days and I am in love with it and feel that this will remain one of my favorites.

-- Heather Wagstaff, on Aeclectic Tarot


Connolly has made major changes to the symbolism of this deck, though she did seem to try to convey the Waite-Smith or "Traditional" meanings in her deck. If you can read with the Waite-Smith deck, you should have little difficulty reading with this one. The suit of Swords has been toned down. There is no bloodshed or violence to women depicted anywhere in this deck. The art is very good. The colors are bright and vibrant and there is lots of detail.

-- Michele Jackson, on Tarot Passages


The Connolly Tarot, created by mom Eileen Connolly and illustrated by son Peter Paul Connolly is a wonderful visually pleasing deck, reminiscent of medieval stained glass often associated with majestic cathedrals found all over Europe.

Peter Connolly has created stunning imagery using colored pencils and rich colors, making this a truly stunning deck. The images follow the Rider Waite symbolism and are easy to follow, making it a great deck for beginners and intermediate readers and has a great positive feel to it. The cards are laminated lightly and the design on the backs makes it able to be read upright or reversed.

The Minor Arcana are just as beautiful and detailed as the Majors and each have Roman numerals at the top of each card. There are a lot of chubby little cherubs in this deck, which adds a sense of charm and spirituality that runs through both Major and Minor Arcana. I just love the colors, they are striking and the symbolism is gentle and easy to interpret. This would be a great deck for any collection.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic

$21.95
Conscious Spirit Oracle Deck
Conscious Spirit Oracle Deck

What customers are saying about Conscious Spirit Oracle

Oh what a lovely deck!  I’m intrigued by the idea behind this deck and I have been exploring possibilities!  My first impression of this deck was that each of the 44 cards is a Journey within a bigger Journey.  The card backs are full of interesting symbols too: The Seven Chakras, Phases of the Moon, Sacred Geometry, The Tree of Life and Angel Wings.  Look closer and you will see that the Chakras have ribbons of color that show you what area you’re working with.  For Example the Root Chakra Symbol’s ribbon of color flows downward into the Earth where you see tree roots.  I like this image and I feel it represents the deck perfectly.  The box is flip top and comes with 44 cards and a 44-page guidebook.  The image on the front of the box is card 24 Third Eye Chakra and the image on the back is card 18 Air Elemental. When you look up your card in the guidebook you will see an expanded interpretation or what I would consider advice. 

Kim Dreyer numbered these cards in the order that will take you on a Journey to finding your unique path.  She cautions that this isn’t a quick fix and the guidance they offer requires input and work.  “The cards were designed to gently and lovingly share their wisdom and the wisdom of the universe with you, allowing you to find your soul’s purpose and in so doing, raise the energy of earth and bring about healing, compassion, and love for all life.”

I can’t help but feel that this deck will speak to many who will be guided by the gentle energy and wisdom it holds.  The images are gentle on the eye, beautiful and layered in a unique way that I think most people will find intriguing.  Overall, I like this deck and I especially like the way the artist has shared her vision with us. 

I’m unable to pick a favorite card because each one seems to speak volumes and I like them all! 

—Mary Nale, Nale and Company blogspot


I love the spirit of this deck, with its dramatic images and compelling messages. Each scene creates an enchanting atmosphere or world that pulls me into its depths, making these cards perfect for meditation or an inspirational daily or weekly draw. I am looking forward to trying them with some of my favorite tarot spreads as well. The deck reflects universal themes and experiences yet also has a highly personal feel that is certain to give it broad appeal.

The cards can be grouped as follows:

•   Chakras (5-Root, 10-Sacral, 13-Solar Plexus, 17-Heart, 20-Throat, 24-Third Eye, 26-Crown)

•   Elementals (6-Earth, 14-Fire, 18-Air, 11-Water)

•   Archangels (9-Raphael, 16-Michael, 22-Gabriel)

•   Triple Goddess(19-A Nurturing Heart-Mother, 38-Forest Frolic-Maiden, 39-Flames of Wisdom-Crone)

•   Other Characters (8-The Healer, 25-Spirit Guides, 33-Sun Goddess, 34-Earth Angel, 35-Nature Spirits, 41-Moon Goddess)

•   Concepts/Messages: (1-Spirit Awareness, 2-Meditation, 3-Transformation, 4-Gratitude, 7-Sacred Space, 12-Reach Out, 15-Find Your Bliss, 21-Your Own Path, 23-The Present, 27-Spark of Divine, 28-Release, 29-Balance, 30-Reach for Your Dreams, 31-Embrace Change, 32-Movement Meditation, 36-Abundance, 37-Crystal Ascension, 40-At Day's End-Rest, 42-Wheel of Life, 43-Celebrate Life, 44-Integration

Dreyer's art clearly expresses her "passionate interest in the supernatural, fantasy, and esoteric world as well as a deep love of nature." Colors are vibrant and varied, ranging from cool to warm in shades of purple, blue, green, red, orange, yellow, and brown. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel and are alive with movement and mood. Animals play an important role in many of the images. For example, a zebra is depicted in 29-Balance, a deer in 4-Gratitude, cats in 40-At Day's End-Rest, a bear in 8-The Healer, and a wolf in 19-A Nurturing Heart-Mother. Each chakra is personified in a beautiful woman and the card is painted in the color associated with that chakra.

—Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


In her introduction, Dreyer states that this deck was created to honor, celebrate, and reconnect to Nature, Spirit, and the Divine Feminine in all her forms: the angel, fairy, goddess, the maiden, mother, and crone. The cards in this deck were arranged to  take the reader on a sequential journey to help the reader to awaken and discover their own unique path.

The cards are meant to assist an individual in making lifestyle changes that bring them into alignment with their higher self.  The cards are meant to gently share their wisdom with you, as well as the wisdom of the universe, allowing the reader to find their soul purpose.

The cards themselves are 3 ½” by 5 ¼”, with a matte finish. The backs shown Dreyer’s diverse background as a fantasy artist and graphic designer, with interests in the supernatural, fantasy, and esoteric, along with her love of nature. The colors are the colors of the chakra system (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and purple). The imagery includes the Tree of Life, the seven chakras, the moon cycles, and more.

The card faces show a 1.4” beige border, with the card number and name across the top in black lettering against a yellow background, with an affirmation in the “voice” of card along the bottom, in the same black lettering against a yellow background. The images are beautifully done in pastels, with a fantasy look to them. Elemental symbols are placed in the four corners of each card.

I love the imagery in this deck – the Fire Elemental show a female figure standing, with her arms outstretched, in a red dress. Flames are coming from her hands, flames surround the hem of her dress, and back light her head and upper body. The Archangel Gabriel shows a female figure, with blond hair, dressed in white, with white wings. In her right hand she carrier a bouquet of white flowers.

From the introduction:

“The purpose of these cards is also to awaken you to the beautiful, unique Human being that you are and to remind you that you have valuable gifts and lessons to share with all of humanity.”

 —Bonnie Cehovet


Honoring angel, fairy, goddess, maiden, mother, and crone, these 44 elegantly beautiful cards capture the power of spirit infusing the earth plane. The magical environment of each card summons the observer to join the lady who inhabits that environment and participate in the celebration of the particular wisdom which she represents.

Meditated on sequentially, the cards create a journey, from awakening to integration, which is filled with wisdom and enlightenment. Individually, each card is a trigger which releases intuitive  information and insight. This deck is a delight and your muses and spirit helpers will love it as much as you do.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com
$17.95
Cosmic Tarot
Cosmic Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT COSMIC TAROT:

I've tried many decks before picking up my first set of these cards. I use them so often I'm purchasing my third deck! I had a lot of trouble understanding the meaning behind the tarot cards until I picked up Cosmic Tarot. Everything suddenly became clear. The pictures are nice to look at and not confusing. They symbolism is clear and helpful. The court cards make more sense than any other deck out there. I highly recommend this deck for anyone.

-- Sadie, on Amazon


The artwork on these cards is quite extraordinary. It is certainly one of those instances where the on-line scans do not do justice to the artwork. The title card explains that Norbert Losche is a self-taught artist. I believe the technique used to create the cards was to use pen and ink. The illustrations are rich in detail and symbolism. The figure drawing is faultless and the use of color is quite spectacular. In the suit of wands the dominant colors seem to be pink and yellow, while in the cups suit there is a dominance of blue and green. The other suits and the trumps are more varied.

It seems with this deck his intention was to create a deck based soundly on the Golden Dawn system. In some ways it is like a fully illustrated version of the Golden Dawn's 'Book T', with the exception of the Court cards. The Major Arcana would appear to be fairly much in line with the symbolism used by Waite in his own deck with only a few exceptions. The Hierophant appears quite differently and more like a mystic than a Pope. He holds a card in one hand and looks to his right and we see a ray of light in his line of vision. The Hermit is a younger man sitting in a yogic posture with eyes closed. His lamp is beside him on the ground and a star above radiates light. The Wheel of Fortune is another elaborate design showing a huge wheel in the night sky. The planets are arranged in such a way as to fit onto the Qabalistic tree of life. A ring showing the zodiacal glyphs surrounds the six ancient planets surrounding the Sun in the centre. The artwork on the majors, like on all cards, is intricate and full of detail.

The Court cards seem to illustrate stars of the silver screen era. While there are a few I can pick, many are unfamiliar to me. Almost all are blessed with incredibly good looks. All figures are shown in a portrait style with the upper body only. Again they are intricately detailed. The cards are linked to different astrological signs but in a different way to the normal Golden Dawn attributions. The creators’ attributions are quite unique I believe. He links the four Cardinal signs to the Kings, the mutable signs to the Queens and the Fixed signs to the Princes. Most of the figures have a symbol of the associated sign on or near them. For example, the King of Cups has a crab pinned to his lapel to represent Cancer. In the background of the Queen of Wands we can see an archer at the top of a tower, representing Sagittarius.

The Minor Arcana are fully illustrated but quite different in many instances from the Waite-Smith minors. I have heard them described as more like the Thoth meanings. Personally, I believe that Norbert Losche has attempted to provide illustrations based on the Golden Dawn meanings from 'Book T', which is where the Thoth and most of the Waite-Smith meanings also come from. In many of the minor cards we can also see zodiacal or planetary glyphs or symbols which link the astrological associations made by the Golden Dawn. While at first someone familiar with the Waite-Smith system may find these cards quite different, anyone who was familiar with the underlying Golden Dawn meanings could quite easily make sense of them.

The Six of Cups shows a couple sharing a quiet moment together. There is the sense of intimacy as well. This fits with the Golden Dawn title of 'Pleasure'. The Four of swords shows four men sitting down and sharing a drink. There is a camel tethered in the background. Four swords are laid out on a blanket in front of them on which is the glyph for Jupiter. The Golden Dawn title for this card is 'Rest from Strife'. On the Thoth deck Crowley titles is 'Truce'.

Of course, for those readers who read more intuitively, these images provide a perfect visual and symbolic landscape as the colors are rich and the images are very detailed. I would recommend this deck for beginners as well as more experienced readers, and certainly for collectors. The deck provides a solid framework with its basis in the Golden Dawn system and also has plenty of scope for intuitive interpretation. The artwork is, in my opinion, almost unequalled in modern tarot decks. Having now been in print for almost 25 years is a testament to both its substance and beauty.

-- Sapienza, Aeclectic Tarot


The Cosmic Tarot is a deck you'll want to consider as an everyday reader. Overall, the images are evocative, but still retain the balance needed for productive readings. Nudity is at a minimum, and is tastefully portrayed. The images themselves are pen and ink, with pastel colors dominating the palette. The court cards consist of portrait drawings of persons who bear remarkable likeness to Hollywood stars. However, they are not so similar as to be distracting. The pip cards are detailed enough to allow for intuitive readings based upon the image alone.

My favorite card is probably the High Priestess. Her deep penetrating gaze peers over the waters, and stands amidst a smaller drawing of two lovers, a crescent moon, and the book of alpha and omega. The card back is probably one of the best designs I have ever seen. A star field contains an elaborate pentagram, with a rising sun and moon. At the center lies a white rose. The artist, Norbert Losche, is self taught, which is remarkable, given the aesthetic quality of the drawings.

-- Gary Higgins, Aeclectic Tarot


Hands down my favorite Tarot deck. The images are rich with symbolism that anyone can understand, and that's important when you're a novice reader.

The cards do have a 1930s or 1940s Hollywood feel to them; the images are supposed to portray specific actors and actresses from that era, but I personally don't notice these resemblances when I'm doing a reading. I think the artist just happened to hit on the right face for each of the various cards. What is noticeable is how the blue, black, and white colors and the shading effects used in the art seem to deepen and enhance certain symbolic elements of each card.

-- Breezy0413, on Amazon

$26.95
Creative Whack Pack® 6-unit Display
Creative Whack Pack® 6-unit Display

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CREATIVE WHACK PACK:

Roger von Oech has won a loyal following around the country.

-- BusinessWeek Magazine

$96.00
Creative Whack Pack® Deck
Creative Whack Pack® Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CREATIVE WHACK PACK:

Roger von Oech has won a loyal following around the country.

-- BusinessWeek Magazine

$16.00
Crystal Visions Tarot
Crystal Visions Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CRYSTAL VISIONS TAROT:

When you open up the Crystal Visions Tarot by fantasy artist Jennifer Galasso, you are entering a different world -- a colorful one filled with crystals, fairies, animals and mystical figures. The artist was inspired by Stevie Nicks' latest CD "Crystal Visions" as well as her interest in crystal balls.

I was enchanted with the vibrant images right away. The artist's color choices are bold and bright yet still ethereal. Purples, scarlet reds, deep indigos and lush greens make this deck a visual feast for the eyes. While the art is fantasy based, it manages to steer away from being too cheesy. Although some of the figures were a bit cartoonish, overall the look is whimsical, romantic and mythical. Based on the standard Rider Waite Smith system, this deck stays almost true to the tradition -- there is an additional card in the deck, giving you 79 cards rather than 78. This extra card is called "The Unknown Card" and when it lands in a reading, it represents something that is "not yet meant to be revealed". The usual Majors are featured and the suits are traditional Cups, Wands, Swords and Pentacles. Court cards are Kings, Queens, Knights and Pages.

Different flowers and animals represent each suit:
Cups: emotions -- water lilies and dragon flies
Swords: intellect and conflict -- ravens and winged creatures
Pentacles: material things and money -- crystals, fruitful trees, wildlife
Wands: creativity -- candles, sprites, dragons

While I enjoyed the art in the Minors, the Majors are the standout part of this deck. My favorites were the Hierophant with the pope sitting on a throne in front of a stained glass window adorned with different religious symbols; the eerie Death card with a ghostly figure standing above a seemingly dead female on a headstone; the mighty Emperor with his ram's mask and The Devil with a playful Pan like figure in the background trying to entice a naked woman who lounging by a tree with an apple in her hand (who is tempting who?) I would recommend this deck to any tarot collector, any fans of fantasy art, younger readers or beginners, as well as anyone who enjoys crystals and faeries. There are no really creepy images, making this deck appropriate for everyone. Two Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady


If you like fantasy art, (and who doesn't?) this deck is a must have for all Tarot deck collectors and readers. It's beautifully illustrated, full of symbology, and evocative. Based on the traditional structure of the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) system of a 78 card deck, you will find the familiar names of the Major Arcana, the Court, and the suits: Wands, Cups, Pentacles, Swords. Included is an added bonus, The Unknown Card. The images are clear in their detail and of sufficient size to see them clearly, and surrounded by a narrow white border. The backs are reversible with a large opalescent sphere in the center which is surrounded by a filigree of rose vines and gems. A pentacle rests in each corner, while a chalice sits in the center at top and bottom.

This beautiful deck would be appropriate for beginners to more advanced readers. I believe I will be spending many delighted hours now and in the future, working with this deck. I’m sure clients will find it as pleasing, if not more so, as I do. If you happen to be on the fence about purchasing this deck, I would recommend it for either yourself or as a gift. It's a win-win!

-- Koneta Bailey, New Paths Tarot


Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to the classic Rider-Waite 78-card system in much of its symbolism, as well as in card and suit names. The luscious card imagery also illustrates the elemental aspects of each suit in order to aid the novice in forming associations with the cards. The Crystal Visions Tarot deck includes 78 cards with an additional unknown card for gazing into future situations that have not yet been revealed, or for exploring issues with deeper insight. The instruction booklet offers both upright and reversed meanings.

The LWB provides an Introduction to the deck along with descriptions and divinatory meanings for each card, including meanings for reversed cards. I am impressed with the amount and value of the material in this LWB. We are given the usual DMs but we are also given insight into the reasoning behind the depiction of the characters on the cards. For example, the description of The World includes: "The characters depicted in this card sits on top of the world in the lotus pose. She appears to be meditating, listening to the hum of the universe. She wears a necklace with the Hindu symbol 'Om' symbolizing the most perfect integration of mind, body and spirit."

The colors on these cards are soft yet vivid. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel. The characters primarily consist of broad-shouldered, well-proportioned men and beautiful, slender women with long, flowing hair. These ethereal images are pleasing to the eye in both color and style. Each suit has its own consistent color scheme, inspired by the element associated with that suit. The Cups cards feature violet and magenta backgrounds; the card titles are black on a pinky lavender bar. Swords cards are indigo and lavender, with the titles written on a lavender-blue bar. Pentacles cards are shades of green and brown, with the titles written on a pale olive-green bar. Wands cards are orange-red and maroon, with the titles written on what I would call a rosy beige bar. The artist's "cool" and "warm" palettes make it easy to recognize the elemental associations in any given spread.

The symbolism on the cards also ties in nicely with elemental associations. For example, the moon appears in in various phases on all of the Cups (Water) cards. Lions and dragons appear on many of the Wands (Fire) cards. Birds or butterflies appear on most of the Swords (Air) cards. Trees and plants dominate the scenes on the Pentacles (Earth) cards.

This deck is likely to appeal to readers who prefer traditional RWS titles and symbolism, but also like to work with cards that feature romantic, fantasy-style art suggestive of the Faerie realm. The level of detail in the images encourages closer study of the cards, yet is not overwhelming. Although the characters are not people you are likely to see in your everyday life, many of them are approachable and engaging. The Unknown Card may not appeal to everyone, but you don't have to use it if you don't like it. I recommend meditating on The Unknown Card before shuffling and drawing cards from this deck for the reading.

-- Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


When I saw images of the Crystal Visions Tarot deck online, I thought it was very pretty, but I just didn't realize how beautiful these cards actually were until I bought them and held them in my hands. For many decks, sample images don't truly do a deck justice, and this one is no exception. Having these cards in my hands to shuffle and read with on an up-close-and-personal basis allowed me to quickly connect -- and to classify this deck among my favorites!

I love the feminine feel of this deck. The imagery is beautiful with rich tones that speak to me on an emotional level. And for those who prefer the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) style of Tarot, the symbolism of the Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to tradition -- from the titles and ordering of the Major Arcana Cards (with Strength as #8 and Justice as #11) ... to the suit names: Cups, Swords, Pentacles, and Wands ... to the traditional court card names: Page, Knight, Queen, and King. while the deck is beautiful to look at, it also renders such beautiful and meaningful energy in reading the cards. As mentioned, this deck really speaks to me on an emotional level. In fact, I quickly made friends with the Crystal Visions Tarot. Doing my first reading with this deck of cards was like connecting with a dear and trusted friend -- even though the cards and I just met during the first week of January 2012. What a lovely way to start my new year in the world of Tarot!

If you are familiar with a RWS deck, you can read the Crystal Visions Tarot straight out of the box with the understanding that there is that extra card in this deck. But for those who are new to the Tarot, I like the way the author and artist has written the 63-page accompanying booklet. It's far better than most LWB's available for a deck. I feel that even a beginner to Tarot could successfully learn Tarot with this deck and the proper books for learning this subject.

A fascinating thing I noticed in this deck is that for the cards that can signify change or rebirth on some level, there are butterflies as part of the symbolism for those cards. In the description of the High Priestess card above, the author tells us that butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and eternal life. I definitely agree, and I would add to that description that butterflies are a symbol of change. Butterflies can show us a "lighter" side of a situation, or can show how thought transforms or changes one's understanding of life and circumstances.

This is a deck that I plan to use frequently since it feels as comfortable to me as the RWS traditional tarot deck, and thus I appreciate the fact that a quality cardstock has been used for this deck. The quality cardstock will allow the Crystal Visions Tarot to stand the test of time with heavy usage.

While I noted that this deck has a feminine feel to me, there are still plenty of male characters contained within the cards. A third of the deck does feature men in the imagery. So it's not a gender biased deck. It just has a soft, gentle, nurturing, and feminine feeling for me. Of course, I don't want to leave you with the impression that this deck is filled with fluff and can't tell it like it is. It definitely can tell the tale of a difficult and challenging story in your life, but at the same time, it's like having a friend by your side who will offer comfort, support, and guidance to get through whatever you're going through. This is the kind of gentle strength that offers empowerment.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone who enjoys the RWS tarot decks, to those who want a gentle deck that has a softer approach (yet still powerful!), and even for those who are just starting with the Tarot. The Crystal Visions Tarot follows RWS tradition in a way that doesn't clone or copy the familiar and well-loved kind of traditional tarot deck, but is still similar enough to immediately resonate with. Collectors will also want to get a copy of this deck, too.

-- Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


To call a tarot deck "different" is definitely vague. The Crystal Visions Tarot is different from many tarot decks I have come across. The cards reflect Galasso’s fantasy style, so those who enjoy fantasy-themed decks will surely like this one. Most of the characters on the cards are women, which is a change from many more traditional tarot decks. Similar to the back, the cards are colored in mostly soft pinks and purples. Each card has a colored rectangle at the bottom with the name of the card, and the background color changes depending on the suit of the card, which is great for the reader. The card backs are simple yet complex, with pentacles in each corner and a circle in the center adorned with flowers. A chalice adorns the center of the long ends of the card. The entire back color is muted and soft, pleasing to the eye and drawing you in. The cards are shiny but not slippery. From an imagery perspective, the deck has some similarities to standard RWS symbols, but it is far from a clone. The Fool in this deck walks off a cliff, but instead of a dog she is accompanied by a number of butterflies.

Galasso's attention to detail is impressive -- the Ace of Cups is one of the most beautiful cards I have ever seen in a tarot deck. One interesting fact is the many of the cards have some kind of reference to air -- a dragonfly, fairy, butterfly, or other winged creature -- which is something you don't often see in tarot decks. I especially liked the Death card, which has Death holding a staff topped with an ankh and the inscription VITA MUTATUR NON TOLLITUR (Life is changed, not taken away) on a tomb. Butterflies reinforce the overall transformation feel of the card. It softened the card but rendered it neither foolish nor powerless, which is a fine line to walk.

This deck also features an additional card, bringing the total number of cards to 79. "The Unknown Card" is explained as an area of the reading which requires further examination -- like a past event, for example -- or that additional steps need to be taken to clarify the bigger picture. I'm not a big fan of extra cards in tarot decks, especially with vague descriptions, so likely I'd use the deck without this one.

While I'm not a fan of reading with fantasy decks generally speaking, I intend to give this one a try. I think my clients will like it, and I know I'll enjoy reading with it, especially when I need a change from RWS clone decks and I'd like something soft yet powerful.

-- John Marani, in ATA Quarterly Journal


The first thing to note about this deck is the beautiful use of color in each card. A major strength of this deck is its ability to create a mood or feeling with each card by such masterful use of color. In the author's own words, the cards have a "vibrant and consistent color scheme, in order to be easily recognizable within a spread."

The artist has consistently portrayed each suit experience through specific colors, crystals, people and other beings. She also assigns elements to each of the four suits in the LWB. The world and its artwork are largely influenced by her work as a fantasy artist and illustrator.

Coins -- the scenes take place in and around tress, lots of greens and yellows, crystals and earth spirits.

Cups -- all scenes take place in same locale and include water lilies, dragonflies, the moon in its different phases, pinks and reddish purples.

Wands -- features lions, unicorns, horses, mountainous terrain and lots of red.

Swords -- the scenes are bleak, cold and snowy with nurds and other winged characters.

One particularly striking card for me is the 4 of Swords. A woman lies at rest on her back in snow that almost covers her, and her arms are crossed as if keeping her only slightly warm. Swords, roses and petals are strewn on the snow around her, and the whole scene is viewed from directly above her. While her face is expressionless, the image itself is felt at first glance. In readings I have found that the characters' faces and eyes do not communicate nearly so much as do the gestalt of colors, symbols and flow of details in each card image. Messages with this deck seem to be toned down in an almost introverted style for a nice and gentle read, much like getting advice from a dreamy friend who, even in anger or elation, remains subdued and calm.

-- John Alan, on Tarot Guild


I love the colors and sense of grace in this deck. The intention with this deck was to create art that was unique, but that would be close enough to traditional imagery to allow new readers to learn the Tarot easily. This is a traditional 78 card deck with one additional card in the Major Arcana, entitled the Unknown Card. It represents an answer that is not yet ready to be revealed. I love decks with an extra card like this”! The Unknown Card can refer to something from the past, or something that is going to happen in the future. The area that this card falls in indicates where steps need to be taken to clarify the big picture. There is also a hint to move forward with an open mind, leaving all bias behind. I loved this card before I even knew what it represented -- my thought was "Yes! Another deck with a card that is 'gifted'!" What an incredible card, with the female figure holding a crystal ball in her left hand. In front of her we see the shadow of an owl. Her whole body posture invites the Seeker to peer into the crystal ball! The artwork is done in a fantasy style, using reds, greens, lavender, and dark brown predominately. There is a sense of gentleness and "otherworldliness" that draws one in, and makes one feel right at home.

This is one deck that if I had my way, I would talk about each and every card! However, that is not allowed, so we will look at the cards that pulled me in the strongest. One of my birth cards is the Hermit, so that is one card that I look at in every deck. If there was a make or break card for me, this would be it. Here we see a lone figure, in a lavender robe, sitting atop a mountain, with a lamp in their left hand. They face the right hand side of the card, generally considered to represent the future. To me, they appear very wistful. The Empress stands in the middle of a garden, wearing a bright red dress, and carrying a triskele scepter in her right hand. She holds a heart-shaped charm. Lush greenery is behind her, as well as a tree with bright green foliage and ripe red fruit. In the upper right hand corner of the card we see beautiful butterflies.

The Lovers shows a man and a woman embracing, with flowers in the right and left hand lower corners. The figures are bound by ties held by two doves.

The Ten of Swords in this deck is one of the least scary, but saddest, images of this card that I have seen in any deck. A female figure is face down in the snow, bloody, with ten swords in her back. She is surrounded by snow and barren trees. The clouds in the sky behind her are attempting to part, indicating that there is hope.

The Eight of Pentacles shows a female figure, standing at her spinning wheel, paying ardent attention to her work. I like this card because she is working outside, with greenery surrounding her and a tree behind her.

The Fool in this deck just carries incredible energy! The figure is a female, with dark, flowing hair. She stands on a precipice, one foot on land and one in the air. There is a trail of butterflies in the air to her right.

I found this deck very easy to read with, and feel that it would be a great deck to offer clients as a choice for their readings. The art alone is gorgeous, and the additional card (the Unknown Card) opens up new avenues for reading. It could simply be taken out of the deck if the reader preferred not to use it.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I felt compelled to look through the cards a second time, and a third. Each time I did, I saw something I hadn't noticed before. There are figures of people in the twisted tree branches, and delicate angels in the clouds. The lush flowers and trees have lovely texture, as do the brilliantly colored dragons. The skies and landscapes are evocative. When I looked closely at each card, I realized this isn't a trite deck. I felt like an old woman who has mistakenly assumed a young, pretty girl to be shallow and stupid. Crystal Visions Tarot is true to Rider Waite Smith structure and interpretation. In many cards, the subtle symbolism honors a wealth of tarot tradition, often in clever ways.

It would take a long time to describe all the cards I love in this deck. They include the Fool, who is female. Butterflies, appropriate for the air correspondence of this card, also surround her. Her dress has red ribbons, one of which has casually wrapped around her leg, giving her the ancient tradition of the Fool's red-striped legs. In the World card we see a large lotus flower cradling a globe on which sits a woman in lotus position. More butterflies here, not elementally appropriate, but acceptable, because they are flying out of her palm chakras. As I mentioned earlier, I question the addition of a seventy-ninth card, entitled The Unknown Card. This card says that the answer is, at present, unknowable. Perhaps we need to look within and find the answer in our own heart. The card is actually quite lovely. It shows a modern Goth-looking young Pagan woman holding a crystal ball. The image is rather different from the rest of the deck. It stands out as a special card, belonging to none of the suits. It is a legitimate tradition in random token divination to use a blank token. It makes sense for Galasso to offer us this option.

That I have already started using Crystal Visions Tarot for professional readings is the highest praise I could give any tarot deck. However, I was initially unsure if I wanted to use the Unknown Card, or use my prerogative to remove it. So far, I have left it in the deck. I must admit, it pops up at very appropriate times.

It has been a while since I've discovered a new deck to add to my short list of professional reading decks. Crystal Visions Tarot is attractive, evocative and easy to understand. Unlike many fantasy art tarot decks, its images are uncomplicated and traditional. Do not be fooled by its youthful energy, Crystal Visions Tarot will give great wisdom and depth. It will be a solid learning and reading deck for anyone from beginners to seasoned professionals.

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


Fantasy artist Galasso has transformed classic tarot imagery into a vibrant tour, through a crystal ball, into a magical world filled with fairies, fantastical creatures, and exotic flowers. Color creates the backdrop against which the story of each card is told. Lyrical and mysterious, the illustrations almost sing.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Book
Deviant Moon Tarot Book

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT BOOK

I’ve used the Deviant Moon Tarot deck, both with and without borders, for the better part of seven years. When it first came out I had questions about some of the minutiae in the imagery. So I corresponded with Patrick Valenza. I was surprised with his willingness to share portions of the story with me and fascinated with what he shared with me.

Those early conversations with Patrick revealed that this was not a deck rushed to market like so many other decks these days, and I was left wanting to know more about how the drawings matured. 

Then I began to hear rumors about a book.

On Christmas Eve, the postman dropped off a package. Upon opening it my first thought was, “When US Games Systems does something, they do it right”. It is a stunning book. It’s beautiful. The hardback full-color embossed cover, the weight of the paper – it is a four pound, three hundred forty page adventure for your eyes and mind.

This is the new standard in tarot companion books, and like the deck, it was not rushed to market. You can tell that it was created with love.

This is not just a book that’s about a deck. It is a book that demonstrates the evolution of the Art and the Artist, and it takes us on that evolutionary journey.

This is a book for art students and artists who will appreciate and grow from the shared journey. This is a book for people who would like to understand the dark and the fantastic.

This is a book for people who love the Deviant Moon Tarot, want to see what’s behind the curtain, and have the rest of the story revealed.

Patrick joyfully recounts his creation process, and how his organic and narrative approach to art is the result of thirty years development. He shows us his edits, the images rejected, and entertains us with the stories of creation.

Please don’t clear off a spot on your bookshelf for this book as it won’t be there collecting dust. Its beauty and the heirloom quality of its content will be appreciated time and time again when left out in the open to enjoy and inspire.

—Dan Pelletier, Tarot Garden


It’s almost inevitable that everyone who has ever purchased Patrick Valenza’s game-changing Deviant Moon tarot has said, or heard it uttered: “so where’s the companion book?”

Since its launch in 2008, the Deviant Moon has been one of the most talked-about decks of modern times, as fans endlessly pore over its haunting, marionette-like figures. What do the half-awake, half-dreaming faces mean? And what about the digital textures used throughout?

Deviant Moon fans so far have had to rely on the small booklet supplied with the deck, supplemented by snippets from Patrick himself, who’s a warm and endlessly generous figure on social media. He has long indicated that the deck features details lifted from gravestones and abandoned buildings throughout Long Island and Brooklyn. Fans also know that Patrick was born with an unusually precocious artistic gift, and began preliminary work on the Deviant Moon as a young teenager – but it’s only with the publication of this book that we finally get the whole story.

And what a book it is: weighing in at more than four pounds and nearly three years in the making, U.S. Games and Patrick have teamed up to create not an average tarot how-to, but a vast and sumptuous art book.

It’s sheer size is the first thing that strikes you. This is not a book you’ll slip into a small bag: it’s hefty. But once you’ve got over that, you delve in and immediately realise that size isn’t the only thing that’s supersized here: everything about this book is turned up to 11, to quote from the immortal This is Spinal Tap.

Every card in the deck is rendered in rich colour at full-page size, which in itself is an incredible treat for Deviant Moon fans. The cards aren’t small by any means, but the sheer amount of detail they contain means that sometimes, seeing them bigger really is better. Just exploring the images at such a size, and so beautifully printed, is a wonder. But what really gives this book depth, authenticity and meaning, is the backstory Patrick shares with us.

It turns out that you can’t tell the story of the Deviant Moon without telling the life of Patrick Valenza, and vice versa. The two are irrevocably intertwined, and so to understand the deck’s genesis, we also need to see some of Patrick’s earliest childhood art, charting its development into the genius we see today. As well as childhood art, the book also reveals unseen character sketches, alternative card ideas that didn’t make the cut, and of course, the buildings and gravestones whose images and textures pepper the deck.

As you’d expect, both upright and reversed meanings are given for each card, but there’s so much more. In addition, you might learn about how an image was inspired by a childhood dream, how a card was assembled from images of pieces of metal, how Major Arcana figures can be found in childhood form in the Minors and of course, learn about the legendary chess set Patrick created just for the Ten of Pentacles.

If you’re a confirmed Deviant Moon fan, you might think you already know a lot about this deck, but trust me – there’s far, far more to learn. If the deck is totally new to you, then investing in this book, along with a set of the cards, will see you on a journey of discovery that’s bound to bring you delight for years to come. It’s so much more than ‘just’ a book: this is a tangible labour of love into which the author has poured his heart and soul, not to mention decades of work. For its part, U.S. Games has done a fantastic job as publisher in backing Patrick’s creative vision and by justifying every penny you’ll spend on this book.

It might be more than a tad unwieldy, but this is every inch a luxury, heirloom publication, from the crackle-glaze cover to the brilliant, fake-advert endpapers and above all, the quality of the paper stock and the printing. Every character from the Deviant Moon comes alive with colour and as a fan you can spend hours absorbed, not just in the book, but in the brilliantly-realised esoteric universe Patrick has created.

The saying goes that good things come to those who wait – and this is so much more than a good thing. It’s a unique, beautiful and important thing, epitomising what can be achieved when a creative genius with a truly unique idea is given the time and space to express that idea by a supportive publisher.

—Kate Large, Editor-in-Chief, Pagan Dawn Magazine


There is something about a book that is magical and timeless. Its ability to transport us to different times and places, or into the mind perspective and imagination of another person is nothing short of miraculous. And yet still, there are some books that are further set apart from the others by their dazzling, memorable magic and unforgettable journeys.

The Deviant Moon Tarot is an absolutely decadent dessert full of succulently sinful wonders. And for all its richness, it won't make your waist any thicker, though it will brighten dark corners of your day and satiate your appetite for more. If you have fallen in love with the Deviant Moon Tarot, the book about the deck is an absolute must-have that will add much insight to the details in your deck.

The cover has an embossed glossy sheen and a slightly raised texture when one's fingers are brushed across its cover. You will be tempted to massage the cover as I was. When you move the book in the light, moonlight dances across the raised embossing and shards of light glint off the gold and silver embellishments. The inside covers of this book features an aged, rustic newsprint-look. Several hilarious spoofs of advertisements feature Valenza's curious crew of caricatures. The paper quality of this book's pages is exquisite, smooth like cream, with a rich, clear sheen to the ink. The pages are not pure white, but instead have a faint digital texture that resembles parchment paper. This is a high quality book through and through.

This book's content is centered around Valenza's actual creation of the Deviant Moon Tarot deck, how it was created and how to read it. You'll enter the mind of the author and go on a wild ride of beings that reside on the side of dreams. Valenza's well-loved tarot deck is one of the most popular modern decks available today.

Through this book, you'll learn about the birth of the unique characters in the deck, many by happy accidents and others through very conscious shifting of designs. He also describes pieces and items found within the cards that add to meanings. I was surprised to learn that he would often craft clay items of things found in his deck to assist in his drawing process, and photographs of these crafts are included.  

The book explains in delightful detail how each card image was inspired, and this is where I found the true magic unfold. Many of the images originated when Valenza was just a boy and he includes photographic images of his original childhood sketches along with images of the structures that created the textures he used in the cards. Valenza includes a generous section for every card about both upright as well as reversed meanings. Readers will find the depth of this information invaluable to their readings.

The Major and Minor Arcana cards are treated with equal weight with the generous portions of information provided. Want more? Every card explanation is accompanied by a gorgeous, large, full-page and full-color image of each card in the deck, larger than life and with astounding color, textures and details. You'll see things in this book that didn't make it into the deck: a peek backstage! These gorgeous images surpass even the beauty of the images in his deck because with the increased size is increased clarity and detail.

This book would make a wonderful gift (even to oneself!) and it makes a strikingly proud and intriguing display on a coffee table. It can be read in long bouts of book binges, or in short spurts of daily breaks. I read it behaving much like I do when I'm starved for a good meal and I can't decide whether to wolf it down as fast as possible or to enjoy every delectable microsecond of its delicacy in slow motion. I was constantly torn between the impulse to binge and the realization that there were thousands of textures, tastes and details to focus on...my heart definitely started to beat faster with great glee as I turned the pages.

—Donnaleigh de LaRose, Beyond Worlds Tarot podcast

$39.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Borderless Edition
Deviant Moon Tarot Borderless Edition

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT:

The Deviant Moon Tarot is one of my all-time favorite decks. Now U.S. Games has released a borderless version of the deck, making the brilliant and edgy illustrations even more powerful.

If you’ve seen any of Patrick Valenza’s work, you won’t be surprised to learn that, as a child, he loved spending time in cemeteries. The intensely lyrical look of moonlight casting shadows at midnight, common in 1940s black and white movies, lends a tinge of something deliciously eerie to Valenza’s offbeat cast of characters.

He began drawing tarot cards at the age of nine. This deck was decades in the making and the final product demonstrates what he has learned during those years of study. Nearly grotesque, but never morbid, I wrote in a review of the original deck that it was Valenza’s humor that pulled the illustrations back from the edge. My current evaluation is that it is his passion for and knowledge of the tarot wisdom that elevates the deck from “zombie chic” to transcendent 60s edgy.

Whether in this bold version or the original format, this remains one of my symbolic and creative favorites.

—Anna Jedrziewski, Tarotwise.com
$21.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Deck
Deviant Moon Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT:

I've seen hundreds of Tarot decks over the years, and I can honestly say there is nothing on the market that rivals the sumptuous textures, masterful artistry and utter originality of the Deviant Moon Tarot.

For months now, several images of the Deviant Moon Tarot were posted to the web, capturing the imagination of Tarot enthusiasts worldwide. Many were clamoring for news, more card images and a definitive release date with an almost desperate excitement.

Tarot fans, rejoice! U.S. Games has now unleashed the highly anticipated Deviant Moon Tarot upon the world! And let me tell you, if the exquisite, highly-detailed online images whetted your appetite, the actual deck goes above and beyond expectation.

The Deviant Moon Tarot expands on Rider-Waite imagery with a gloriously twisted perspective, reflecting common associations in dazzling patterns, striking colors, and surprising juxtapositions (e.g. a tree that bleeds red, a Page that has created himself out of spare parts and a sharp-dressed masked armless woman with a wheel for a left “foot"). The 9 of Cups, usually deemed the "Wish Card", aptly depicts a genie who's just emerged from a child's magic lamp.

I’m pleased to report that not only is the Deviant Moon Tarot a solid reading deck, but also unexpectedly insightful.

So despite the unusual characters populating the world of the Deviant Moon, they still speak messages relevant and purposeful to discerning individuals. This would make a great journaling deck, too, as well as one for comparative Tarot studies.

-- Janet Boyer, Tarot Channel


Artistically, the cards are incredibly strong and equally consistent from the Fool all the way through to the King of Pentacles. They are dark on the surface and underneath; photographs from cemeteries and tombstones have been morphed and twisted into other elements of the cards: clothing trim, headgear and shoes. The backgrounds are urban and industrial, scenes are often set outdoors but there is little natural environment; the moon rises over smokestacks, dull and dirty skies, fortified buildings -- all created from photographs of a mental asylum. The figures in the cards are non-human, with layered faces and moon-like masks, wide staring eyes, bird-like feet and often elongated bodies. Despite the lack of regular human facial expressions and body language, the figures are remarkably expressive. It’s a deck of the subconscious, of bad dreams, of visions from a bad trip come to life. Patrick’s symbolism comes from childhood dreams and imagination, a visual dedication to his interest in the ‘more melancholy side of life’. It’s reminiscent of its Rider-Waite heritage but really has a feeling all of its own. It’s a nice change to see imagery with such polish and dedication that also has an obvious familiarity with the tarot’s symbolism; it stays true to tarot but brings to it a new and disturbing approach.

The cards depart from traditional elements of symbolism in many ways but the card’s tarot meaning is still clear. As in the Nine of Cups, the well-dressed character releases a genie from the bottle and looks on with surprise; a very appropriate image for what is traditionally known as the ‘Wish’ card. The King of Wand isn’t seated on a throne, and instead holds woodland creatures by the hand and strides through the scene, but still comes across as the confident, charismatic leader.

The Moon card is literally the puppet-master of the figures below, holding the strings that connect them and controlling their movements. Ugly but strangely elegant, Death has a red scarf wrapped around her skeletal horse head and a pregnant belly, signaling both the end and the beginning inherent in transformation of Death. The cards do have an uncomfortable edge, even in traditionally positive and usually pretty cards like the Star.

The companion booklet is entirely in English and for each card shares a description of the imagery and a few keywords for the upright and reversed aspect of each card. Reading the booklet really not necessary to use the cards -- all of the depth is in the imagery itself, there is little further background or explanation needed. There’s an original ten-card spread as well, based on cards arranged simply in a circle.

A little tarot knowledge is always useful, but it’s not mandatory to use the Deviant Moon. The dark and strange beauty of its imagery takes a new approach but is true enough to the tarot archetypes to be useable by readers from novice level to the well experienced -- as long as you’re prepared for a little excursion into the dark side of your subconscious.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I received The Deviant Moon Tarot on a Monday and spent four days doing nothing but pursuing the cards.

The images themselves are absorbing surrealistic humanoid figures in abstract settings, that are at once attractive and haunting. Many of the faces are 'split' between a light and dark half, some faces appear to be masked, and on others the masks are faces, some appendages have multiplied beyond the two that we’d see in a humanoid ... we expect to see some things, and we see what we expect ... and then are left unsettled as the images unfold.

Patrick Valenza accomplished something quite unexpected, facilitated because he used a surrealistic approach to the Tarot. He has his static humanoids performing the dynamic actions that pertain to the card’s meaning. For most cards, it is a simple matter of 'what is this character obviously doing now' (or just completed, or about to do). Because of the organic and narrative approach to the subjects, we are also able to understand how each of the characters feels.

The Tower is a tower, and the Devil is a devil (great feet), Temperance pours from one container to another, there are stars on The Star.

However the images keep unfolding.

There were little details that popped out during the readings, and I had to go to the source for some answers.

"Uh Patrick, I notice there are a few oddly placed clocks with unexpected times displayed, for example in the Eight of Pentacles the clock displays eleven fifty-eight."
"Thanks for noticing" answered Patrick, with a wry smile, "Yup, two minutes to midnight ... all the work you do in a day, and there is always more to do the next. Day in and day out. Hoping for something to show after all of this work ... maybe you won't see it today, but maybe tomorrow."
"How about the Four of Pentacles, the clock there displays nine forty."
Patrick pauses and leans back. "There’s a background story here. My father-in-law was a greedy, materialistic man. Everything in his life was based on what he owned, and always put himself over his children. Well, the day came when he finally died. We heard the news at about 9:40 one morning. Nobody was particularly heart broken. I always wondered what he thought, lying there waiting to be cremated ... does he say to himself, 'I wish I spent more time with my children as they grew up', or was it, 'DAMN, I didn't make enough money!' So in this card, the death angel leads the miser to the fires of the furnace, with the symbol of time dangling from her mouth. The miser looks back on his possessions in fear that he will never see them again, while clutching a few golden pentacles in a last attempt to "take it with him".
I ask "How about the Hanged Man. His clock says five eleven."
"I used to work at the most mundane job years ago ... a real nine to five. Many times, I would work a bit past the whistle. I found it a total waste of time, but back then I had little choice. I felt I was in limbo, and had to make a real effort to break free of my suspended life. This clock represents my lost time there and the times I worked past 5:00."
One last question Patrick, tell me about the borders ... "
"The mixed colors come from the cards I created when I was 15. Truthfully, the colors on the majors just looked good with the color compositions of the individual cards at the time, so I just carried that over when I re-began the deck in 2004. However, the minors were different ... these colors relate to the citizens of each realm. The borders on the suit of Swords are Red for their strife and pain of the heart. Cups have Blue for the calm purity of the sea. In Wands I used Green for the earth and the natural world. And with Pentacles, Black for the materialistic void they have in their souls."

So now that we have more information, we’ve also left the antiquated suit meanings in the past where they belong, in the latter half of the Victorian era. Even Majors refuse to pay homage to this era by using the Continental numbering system.

This is a great deck for the reader who does not want to read a book and be told what meaning is.

But I have to provide a strong caveat ... if you are a reader who prefers sunny bunny over truth -- don’t visit this deck. The Deviant Moon strikes to the heart of issues, with the same ease that it pushes aside six hundred years of Tarot myth-takes; it dives directly towards the truth. That will unsettle many.

It’s often difficult to remember, that the voices that whisper in the darkness from the peeling walls, often speak the truth.

-- Dan Pelletier, The Tarot Garden


The Deviant Moon Tarot is a Moon theme RWS based deck. The art appears very abstract, medieval and is inspired by ancient Greek art. It is a bit on the darker side, but I would not call this a dark deck. It actually appears to be a very workable deck. It will appeal to many, both Readers and Sitters This deck will be especially attractive to those who are fond of the non-traditional or maybe even looking for something a little creepy.

The Little White Book included with this deck, gives meanings for the Majors and the Minors, in both upright and reversed positions. The spread in the back of the LWB is the Lunatic Spread, which is a ten card spread. It’s nice to see someone take some creativity with their LWB!

Patrick Valenza created the Deviant Moon Tarot, basing it on childhood images and visions seen through his imagination and brought with him, into adulthood. His art ranges from detailed colored pencil and acrylic drawings to photographic manipulation that is used in combination with digital drawings, which was used to create this deck. Each card began with a drawing that was scanned into a computer, then they were manipulated. The background buildings were created with photographs that he took of a local abandoned insane asylum.

I particularly like what is going on in the background of each card. There are many unique old-style buildings, which look like old factories, churches and abandoned buildings. There is a lot going on in each card. All of which can apply easily to your readings.

-- Terri Clement, American Tarot Association


For me the first impression of the artwork was startling. But as I began to flip through the cards the little characters began to grow on me. They are sort of gothic and whimsical at the same time and as I looked even closer I saw some interesting symbolism coming through as well. I loved how the characters on the cards had lunar faces- the bright half of the face, which I took as being the conscious self, has an open eye while the dark half, the possible subconscious of the face, has the eye closed. All the cards have titles except Death and the numbered cards. I found this interesting and mysterious it made me want to find out why.

Then my almost 16 year old daughter came in the door and she fell in love with the images; they were just her style. She loves the whole Corpse Bride/Goth scene and this deck was made for her. She is also a budding photographer and loved the idea that the pictures in this deck are made from manipulated photographs.

Then as I continued to flip through the cards I laughed out loud at the 10 of Swords. It’s the typical 10 of Swords image but the little creature is biting on his own hand while a little demon is biting on his shoulder. Somehow this scene just cracked me up. The cat made me laugh too just because it didn’t look very healthy (not that an unhealthy cat is humorous but you have to see this card to get my meaning.) I was starting to really like this little deck with its endearing dark little characters. Then I saw Patrick’s 6 of Cups and knew the Deviant Moon Tarot creator and I had found common ground. There was a puppet show the same idea I had for my MAAT Tarot 6 of Cups.

In my opinion I think other people will come to find Deviant Moon to be a sweet little deck. Congratulations Patrick. I’m looking forward to shaking your hand at some Tarot event soon.

-- Julia Cuccia-Watts, New Moon Trading blogspot


When I was asked by US Games if I would be interested in receiving an advance review copy of Patrick Valenza's new Deviant Moon Tarot, I was very excited. I had seen a few scans of this deck in progress months earlier, and was quite interested in seeing the finished product. When I opened the deck, I was blown away. I had expected that after the first few cards, they would all begin to blend in together, just more of what I'd already seen. Card after card, I was surprised and delighted at every spectacular new image. I have never been more fascinated and impressed with a deck.

The magic of this deck is in its ability to captivate and lure you into this fascinating world. Many times when I'm looking at a deck that strays from traditional RWS imagery, I tend to see flashes in my mind of the RWS equivalent meanings as a comparison. While the Deviant Moon doesn't follow traditional imagery, as soon as I look at one of the cards, I automatically know what card it is, and I've found that before my mind is able to flash to the RWS "meaning" in my head, the artwork forces me to bypass that step, as it pulls me in further and asks more of me. I am drawn to delve deeper into the card, experiencing additional layers of meaning.

There is some talk among the tarot community of this deck being really dark. However, I don't see it that way at all, and when communicating with the artist, he confirmed that it wasn't ever intended to be a dark deck. He explained that it was based on his childhood imagination, a twisted world which is at times a bit melancholy, yet includes elements of humor as well. After working with the deck for a week, I can definitely attest to the fact that the images inspire imagination. The characters, for the most part, aren't maniacal or creepy. They are unique and engaging, and not without emotion. I find the artwork captivating and intriguing, though I do not consider it a dark deck.

The Cards

Valenza's use of color is striking and leads your eyes on a parade around each card, so that you notice the smallest details, down to the color of toenail polish on the characters' feet.

The Aces in this deck really stand out, as they are extremely elaborate. Rather than featuring the usual solitary symbol of a cup, wand, sword or pentacle, the Deviant Moon Aces are fully illustrated with characters.

The originality of Valenza's mastering and blending his artwork with tarot is stunning. I am completely enchanted by the Wands suit of this deck. Ordinarily, it's visually my least favorite suit. This deck has made me love Wands, and that's no small feat! In fact, this deck features so many cards that immediately stood out as my favorite version from any deck, due to their original portrayal.

How it Reads

In addition to my daily draws, I have done a few other readings with the Deviant Moon this week, and have found the deck to be equally as forthcoming and clear in those readings as well. Once the initial overview is clear, the images then draw me in further to elaborate and refine the reading. When laid out, the cards flow together so well and tell stories as though the artist had designed those cards you selected to specifically go together.

Final Thoughts

It should be glaringly obvious how enchanted by and enamored I am of the Deviant Moon Tarot. The originality of this deck far exceeds any other I've seen, and the power it has to draw you into the world of imagination is amazing.

-- Tarot Dame Blog


A bit Dali, a bit Picasso, and a bit Cirque du Soleil, Valenza’s fascinatingly unique creation, the Deviant Moon Tarot, has an idiosyncratic beauty that is mesmerizing and compelling. There is an almost hyper-realism in the clean lines and the crisp colors and textures in the artwork, which presents a vivid contrast with the dreamlike surrealism of the scenes in these cards and the strange figures who cavort within them. Indeed, the cards are populated with bizarre and grotesque characters that seem to have been inspired by a medieval bestiary or imagined by a child fearing what might be lurking under the bed at night.

Valenza’s use of traditional Tarot symbolism on these cards is spare, but he has compensated for this by lavishing upon them whatever his imagination could dredge up from the depths of his subconscious. In this way, he has created a deck with a very creative take on the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith imagery.

-- James Ricklef


To say The Deviant Moon Tarot deck is just another deck in Rider Waite Smith tradition would be an understatement. The deck takes you into another world of ying/yang insectoid creatures populating a bleak industrial landscape. Patrick Valenza subliminally inserted images from cemataries and an abandonded insane asylum into the images. My first impression upon my receipt of the deck that it was too dark for me to do readings with for people I ordinarily would read for; but for those whose tastes lean to the unusual I'm sure it would work fine. The symbolism of the images maintains traditional interpretations in most cases, but give it a new twist. I think this is an excellent deck for collectors as well as those whose tastes and insights gravitate towards dark imaginings. Valenza is a talented surrealist, and more than just in a deck of cards, the images belong in a museum as each are a unique work of art, making the old new again and reinterpreting it for our times.

-- Thomas Santomartino, Amazon customer


I have over 50 Tarot decks and this is the best symbology I have yet to see. I especially love the Death card with the pregnant mother and her having to exert some gentle force with her foot on the previous child to remind him that going back into the womb is not a possibility. It really gets to the nature of the Death card being permanent, can't go back, can only go forward change - change with or without our initiation. I love how most of the characters have more than one layer to their face - it invites you to ask, "How deep do you want to go?". The Lunatic Spread is great for getting to the meat of a matter and is an added bonus. The LWB is adequate but the real prize is the thought provoking scenarios on each of the cards. Well done!!!!!!

-- Deborah, East Texas, Amazon customer


I can’t say enough about how much I love this deck! The imagery is spectacular and just the feel that was needed in the tarot world. The deck is very high quality and the minor cards are wonderful. This is exactly the deck I have been waiting for!

-- coli0157, Amazon customer


The Deviant Moon is a gorgeously alive deck. I thought just the artwork was appealing to me, but the more I work with these cards the more impressed I am. You can really sit down and have a conversation with the populace of this world, and they speak clearly. If you wonder at all about getting this deck, don't hesitate. Their world is not perfect, but they are not dark by any stretch of the imagination, and it is a deck that truly only requires reading the cards, no memorization, no confusion. The coating feels like satin, and the colors are amazing. I can't say enough good things about this deck, and I thank the creator, Patrick Valenza, most heartily!

-- Amanda Hilbrecht, Amazon customer


Valenza's highly stylized drawings are evocative, provocative, and fabulously unique. Each card is painstakingly illustrated but lacks the glitzy clutter of so many over-fluffed decks out there that lose themselves in dumbed-down beauty. This deck demands that you pay attention to the meaning of the card, not just how lovely the pictures are. As the author mentions in one of his interviews, there are no "filler" cards in this deck ... and it shows.

So far, the readings I've done using these cards have been full of wry humor and straightforward truth. This deck has a crystal clear "personality" that refuses to compromise. Absolutely no fluff here, just an unabashed and incisive approach to "traditional" Tarot reading.

-- Tessa Dagger, Amazon customer

$21.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Deck -- Premier Edition
Deviant Moon Tarot Deck -- Premier Edition

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT:

I've seen hundreds of Tarot decks over the years, and I can honestly say there is nothing on the market that rivals the sumptuous textures, masterful artistry and utter originality of the Deviant Moon Tarot.

For months now, several images of the Deviant Moon Tarot were posted to the web, capturing the imagination of Tarot enthusiasts worldwide. Many were clamoring for news, more card images and a definitive release date with an almost desperate excitement.

Tarot fans, rejoice! U.S. Games has now unleashed the highly anticipated Deviant Moon Tarot upon the world! And let me tell you, if the exquisite, highly-detailed online images whetted your appetite, the actual deck goes above and beyond expectation.

The Deviant Moon Tarot expands on Rider-Waite imagery with a gloriously twisted perspective, reflecting common associations in dazzling patterns, striking colors, and surprising juxtapositions (e.g. a tree that bleeds red, a Page that has created himself out of spare parts and a sharp-dressed masked armless woman with a wheel for a left “foot"). The 9 of Cups, usually deemed the "Wish Card", aptly depicts a genie who's just emerged from a child's magic lamp.

I’m pleased to report that not only is the Deviant Moon Tarot a solid reading deck, but also unexpectedly insightful.

So despite the unusual characters populating the world of the Deviant Moon, they still speak messages relevant and purposeful to discerning individuals. This would make a great journaling deck, too, as well as one for comparative Tarot studies.

-- Janet Boyer, Tarot Channel


Artistically, the cards are incredibly strong and equally consistent from the Fool all the way through to the King of Pentacles. They are dark on the surface and underneath; photographs from cemeteries and tombstones have been morphed and twisted into other elements of the cards: clothing trim, headgear and shoes. The backgrounds are urban and industrial, scenes are often set outdoors but there is little natural environment; the moon rises over smokestacks, dull and dirty skies, fortified buildings -- all created from photographs of a mental asylum. The figures in the cards are non-human, with layered faces and moon-like masks, wide staring eyes, bird-like feet and often elongated bodies. Despite the lack of regular human facial expressions and body language, the figures are remarkably expressive. It’s a deck of the subconscious, of bad dreams, of visions from a bad trip come to life. Patrick’s symbolism comes from childhood dreams and imagination, a visual dedication to his interest in the ‘more melancholy side of life’. It’s reminiscent of its Rider-Waite heritage but really has a feeling all of its own. It’s a nice change to see imagery with such polish and dedication that also has an obvious familiarity with the tarot’s symbolism; it stays true to tarot but brings to it a new and disturbing approach.

The cards depart from traditional elements of symbolism in many ways but the card’s tarot meaning is still clear. As in the Nine of Cups, the well-dressed character releases a genie from the bottle and looks on with surprise; a very appropriate image for what is traditionally known as the ‘Wish’ card. The King of Wand isn’t seated on a throne, and instead holds woodland creatures by the hand and strides through the scene, but still comes across as the confident, charismatic leader.

The Moon card is literally the puppet-master of the figures below, holding the strings that connect them and controlling their movements. Ugly but strangely elegant, Death has a red scarf wrapped around her skeletal horse head and a pregnant belly, signaling both the end and the beginning inherent in transformation of Death. The cards do have an uncomfortable edge, even in traditionally positive and usually pretty cards like the Star.

The companion booklet is entirely in English and for each card shares a description of the imagery and a few keywords for the upright and reversed aspect of each card. Reading the booklet really not necessary to use the cards -- all of the depth is in the imagery itself, there is little further background or explanation needed. There’s an original ten-card spread as well, based on cards arranged simply in a circle.

A little tarot knowledge is always useful, but it’s not mandatory to use the Deviant Moon. The dark and strange beauty of its imagery takes a new approach but is true enough to the tarot archetypes to be useable by readers from novice level to the well experienced -- as long as you’re prepared for a little excursion into the dark side of your subconscious.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I received The Deviant Moon Tarot on a Monday and spent four days doing nothing but pursuing the cards.

The images themselves are absorbing surrealistic humanoid figures in abstract settings, that are at once attractive and haunting. Many of the faces are 'split' between a light and dark half, some faces appear to be masked, and on others the masks are faces, some appendages have multiplied beyond the two that we’d see in a humanoid ... we expect to see some things, and we see what we expect ... and then are left unsettled as the images unfold.

Patrick Valenza accomplished something quite unexpected, facilitated because he used a surrealistic approach to the Tarot. He has his static humanoids performing the dynamic actions that pertain to the card’s meaning. For most cards, it is a simple matter of 'what is this character obviously doing now' (or just completed, or about to do). Because of the organic and narrative approach to the subjects, we are also able to understand how each of the characters feels.

The Tower is a tower, and the Devil is a devil (great feet), Temperance pours from one container to another, there are stars on The Star.

However the images keep unfolding.

There were little details that popped out during the readings, and I had to go to the source for some answers.

"Uh Patrick, I notice there are a few oddly placed clocks with unexpected times displayed, for example in the Eight of Pentacles the clock displays eleven fifty-eight."
"Thanks for noticing" answered Patrick, with a wry smile, "Yup, two minutes to midnight ... all the work you do in a day, and there is always more to do the next. Day in and day out. Hoping for something to show after all of this work ... maybe you won't see it today, but maybe tomorrow."
"How about the Four of Pentacles, the clock there displays nine forty."
Patrick pauses and leans back. "There’s a background story here. My father-in-law was a greedy, materialistic man. Everything in his life was based on what he owned, and always put himself over his children. Well, the day came when he finally died. We heard the news at about 9:40 one morning. Nobody was particularly heart broken. I always wondered what he thought, lying there waiting to be cremated ... does he say to himself, 'I wish I spent more time with my children as they grew up', or was it, 'DAMN, I didn't make enough money!' So in this card, the death angel leads the miser to the fires of the furnace, with the symbol of time dangling from her mouth. The miser looks back on his possessions in fear that he will never see them again, while clutching a few golden pentacles in a last attempt to "take it with him".
I ask "How about the Hanged Man. His clock says five eleven."
"I used to work at the most mundane job years ago ... a real nine to five. Many times, I would work a bit past the whistle. I found it a total waste of time, but back then I had little choice. I felt I was in limbo, and had to make a real effort to break free of my suspended life. This clock represents my lost time there and the times I worked past 5:00."
One last question Patrick, tell me about the borders ... "
"The mixed colors come from the cards I created when I was 15. Truthfully, the colors on the majors just looked good with the color compositions of the individual cards at the time, so I just carried that over when I re-began the deck in 2004. However, the minors were different ... these colors relate to the citizens of each realm. The borders on the suit of Swords are Red for their strife and pain of the heart. Cups have Blue for the calm purity of the sea. In Wands I used Green for the earth and the natural world. And with Pentacles, Black for the materialistic void they have in their souls."

So now that we have more information, we’ve also left the antiquated suit meanings in the past where they belong, in the latter half of the Victorian era. Even Majors refuse to pay homage to this era by using the Continental numbering system.

This is a great deck for the reader who does not want to read a book and be told what meaning is.

But I have to provide a strong caveat ... if you are a reader who prefers sunny bunny over truth -- don’t visit this deck. The Deviant Moon strikes to the heart of issues, with the same ease that it pushes aside six hundred years of Tarot myth-takes; it dives directly towards the truth. That will unsettle many.

It’s often difficult to remember, that the voices that whisper in the darkness from the peeling walls, often speak the truth.

-- Dan Pelletier, The Tarot Garden


The Deviant Moon Tarot is a Moon theme RWS based deck. The art appears very abstract, medieval and is inspired by ancient Greek art. It is a bit on the darker side, but I would not call this a dark deck. It actually appears to be a very workable deck. It will appeal to many, both Readers and Sitters This deck will be especially attractive to those who are fond of the non-traditional or maybe even looking for something a little creepy.

The Little White Book included with this deck, gives meanings for the Majors and the Minors, in both upright and reversed positions. The spread in the back of the LWB is the Lunatic Spread, which is a ten card spread. It’s nice to see someone take some creativity with their LWB!

Patrick Valenza created the Deviant Moon Tarot, basing it on childhood images and visions seen through his imagination and brought with him, into adulthood. His art ranges from detailed colored pencil and acrylic drawings to photographic manipulation that is used in combination with digital drawings, which was used to create this deck. Each card began with a drawing that was scanned into a computer, then they were manipulated. The background buildings were created with photographs that he took of a local abandoned insane asylum.

I particularly like what is going on in the background of each card. There are many unique old-style buildings, which look like old factories, churches and abandoned buildings. There is a lot going on in each card. All of which can apply easily to your readings.

-- Terri Clement, American Tarot Association


For me the first impression of the artwork was startling. But as I began to flip through the cards the little characters began to grow on me. They are sort of gothic and whimsical at the same time and as I looked even closer I saw some interesting symbolism coming through as well. I loved how the characters on the cards had lunar faces- the bright half of the face, which I took as being the conscious self, has an open eye while the dark half, the possible subconscious of the face, has the eye closed. All the cards have titles except Death and the numbered cards. I found this interesting and mysterious it made me want to find out why.

Then my almost 16 year old daughter came in the door and she fell in love with the images; they were just her style. She loves the whole Corpse Bride/Goth scene and this deck was made for her. She is also a budding photographer and loved the idea that the pictures in this deck are made from manipulated photographs.

Then as I continued to flip through the cards I laughed out loud at the 10 of Swords. It’s the typical 10 of Swords image but the little creature is biting on his own hand while a little demon is biting on his shoulder. Somehow this scene just cracked me up. The cat made me laugh too just because it didn’t look very healthy (not that an unhealthy cat is humorous but you have to see this card to get my meaning.) I was starting to really like this little deck with its endearing dark little characters. Then I saw Patrick’s 6 of Cups and knew the Deviant Moon Tarot creator and I had found common ground. There was a puppet show the same idea I had for my MAAT Tarot 6 of Cups.

In my opinion I think other people will come to find Deviant Moon to be a sweet little deck. Congratulations Patrick. I’m looking forward to shaking your hand at some Tarot event soon.

-- Julia Cuccia-Watts, New Moon Trading blogspot


When I was asked by US Games if I would be interested in receiving an advance review copy of Patrick Valenza's new Deviant Moon Tarot, I was very excited. I had seen a few scans of this deck in progress months earlier, and was quite interested in seeing the finished product. When I opened the deck, I was blown away. I had expected that after the first few cards, they would all begin to blend in together, just more of what I'd already seen. Card after card, I was surprised and delighted at every spectacular new image. I have never been more fascinated and impressed with a deck.

The magic of this deck is in its ability to captivate and lure you into this fascinating world. Many times when I'm looking at a deck that strays from traditional RWS imagery, I tend to see flashes in my mind of the RWS equivalent meanings as a comparison. While the Deviant Moon doesn't follow traditional imagery, as soon as I look at one of the cards, I automatically know what card it is, and I've found that before my mind is able to flash to the RWS "meaning" in my head, the artwork forces me to bypass that step, as it pulls me in further and asks more of me. I am drawn to delve deeper into the card, experiencing additional layers of meaning.

There is some talk among the tarot community of this deck being really dark. However, I don't see it that way at all, and when communicating with the artist, he confirmed that it wasn't ever intended to be a dark deck. He explained that it was based on his childhood imagination, a twisted world which is at times a bit melancholy, yet includes elements of humor as well. After working with the deck for a week, I can definitely attest to the fact that the images inspire imagination. The characters, for the most part, aren't maniacal or creepy. They are unique and engaging, and not without emotion. I find the artwork captivating and intriguing, though I do not consider it a dark deck.

The Cards

Valenza's use of color is striking and leads your eyes on a parade around each card, so that you notice the smallest details, down to the color of toenail polish on the characters' feet.

The Aces in this deck really stand out, as they are extremely elaborate. Rather than featuring the usual solitary symbol of a cup, wand, sword or pentacle, the Deviant Moon Aces are fully illustrated with characters.

The originality of Valenza's mastering and blending his artwork with tarot is stunning. I am completely enchanted by the Wands suit of this deck. Ordinarily, it's visually my least favorite suit. This deck has made me love Wands, and that's no small feat! In fact, this deck features so many cards that immediately stood out as my favorite version from any deck, due to their original portrayal.

How it Reads

In addition to my daily draws, I have done a few other readings with the Deviant Moon this week, and have found the deck to be equally as forthcoming and clear in those readings as well. Once the initial overview is clear, the images then draw me in further to elaborate and refine the reading. When laid out, the cards flow together so well and tell stories as though the artist had designed those cards you selected to specifically go together.

Final Thoughts

It should be glaringly obvious how enchanted by and enamored I am of the Deviant Moon Tarot. The originality of this deck far exceeds any other I've seen, and the power it has to draw you into the world of imagination is amazing.

-- Tarot Dame Blog


A bit Dali, a bit Picasso, and a bit Cirque du Soleil, Valenza’s fascinatingly unique creation, the Deviant Moon Tarot, has an idiosyncratic beauty that is mesmerizing and compelling. There is an almost hyper-realism in the clean lines and the crisp colors and textures in the artwork, which presents a vivid contrast with the dreamlike surrealism of the scenes in these cards and the strange figures who cavort within them. Indeed, the cards are populated with bizarre and grotesque characters that seem to have been inspired by a medieval bestiary or imagined by a child fearing what might be lurking under the bed at night.

Valenza’s use of traditional Tarot symbolism on these cards is spare, but he has compensated for this by lavishing upon them whatever his imagination could dredge up from the depths of his subconscious. In this way, he has created a deck with a very creative take on the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith imagery.

-- James Ricklef


To say The Deviant Moon Tarot deck is just another deck in Rider Waite Smith tradition would be an understatement. The deck takes you into another world of ying/yang insectoid creatures populating a bleak industrial landscape. Patrick Valenza subliminally inserted images from cemataries and an abandonded insane asylum into the images. My first impression upon my receipt of the deck that it was too dark for me to do readings with for people I ordinarily would read for; but for those whose tastes lean to the unusual I'm sure it would work fine. The symbolism of the images maintains traditional interpretations in most cases, but give it a new twist. I think this is an excellent deck for collectors as well as those whose tastes and insights gravitate towards dark imaginings. Valenza is a talented surrealist, and more than just in a deck of cards, the images belong in a museum as each are a unique work of art, making the old new again and reinterpreting it for our times.

-- Thomas Santomartino, Amazon customer


I have over 50 Tarot decks and this is the best symbology I have yet to see. I especially love the Death card with the pregnant mother and her having to exert some gentle force with her foot on the previous child to remind him that going back into the womb is not a possibility. It really gets to the nature of the Death card being permanent, can't go back, can only go forward change - change with or without our initiation. I love how most of the characters have more than one layer to their face - it invites you to ask, "How deep do you want to go?". The Lunatic Spread is great for getting to the meat of a matter and is an added bonus. The LWB is adequate but the real prize is the thought provoking scenarios on each of the cards. Well done!!!!!!

-- Deborah, East Texas, Amazon customer


I can’t say enough about how much I love this deck! The imagery is spectacular and just the feel that was needed in the tarot world. The deck is very high quality and the minor cards are wonderful. This is exactly the deck I have been waiting for!

-- coli0157, Amazon customer


The Deviant Moon is a gorgeously alive deck. I thought just the artwork was appealing to me, but the more I work with these cards the more impressed I am. You can really sit down and have a conversation with the populace of this world, and they speak clearly. If you wonder at all about getting this deck, don't hesitate. Their world is not perfect, but they are not dark by any stretch of the imagination, and it is a deck that truly only requires reading the cards, no memorization, no confusion. The coating feels like satin, and the colors are amazing. I can't say enough good things about this deck, and I thank the creator, Patrick Valenza, most heartily!

-- Amanda Hilbrecht, Amazon customer


Valenza's highly stylized drawings are evocative, provocative, and fabulously unique. Each card is painstakingly illustrated but lacks the glitzy clutter of so many over-fluffed decks out there that lose themselves in dumbed-down beauty. This deck demands that you pay attention to the meaning of the card, not just how lovely the pictures are. As the author mentions in one of his interviews, there are no "filler" cards in this deck ... and it shows.

So far, the readings I've done using these cards have been full of wry humor and straightforward truth. This deck has a crystal clear "personality" that refuses to compromise. Absolutely no fluff here, just an unabashed and incisive approach to "traditional" Tarot reading.

-- Tessa Dagger, Amazon customer

$25.95
Dragon Tarot
Dragon Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DRAGON TAROT:

When I first became interested in reading the tarot, the one thing that I had a problem with was finding a deck that suited my feelings and represented ME. Then one day I stumbled upon the Dragon deck, and I felt like my prayers had been answered! The artwork and symbolism, combined with the rich history, myth, and mystique that surrounds dragons in general, turned out to be just what the doctor ordered. The use of many rich colors was something that I felt, at that point in time, many other decks didn't seem to have (although now I know otherwise). But, my absolute favorite part about this deck are the Major Arcana. They were (and still are) like nothing I had ever seen before. The capture all the symbolism of traditional tarot decks, but they also contain a draconic twist that is sometimes a bit funny (in particular, the Hanging Dragon card!).

All in all, the Dragon Tarot was the first deck I ever owned, and it remains my favorite to this day. I highly suggest this deck to anyone who doesn't feel connected to the more traditional decks, and longs for something deeper. It is very hard to put into words all that I feel with this deck, so you may be better off experiencing its power for yourself, but believe me, you won't regret it! Again, I have seen many decks in my days, but none of them compares to the power and imagery of the Dragon Tarot!

-- Charlie Taylor, on Aeclectic Tarot


I absolutely LOVE this deck. The images are beautiful and powerful and readings are very accurate for me. A friend of mine did one reading with my cards and has decided he wants a deck of his own. It is a very strong deck, but "welcoming," almost like coming home. If you like dragons, you will most likely connect with this deck and may keep it as your personal deck.

-- Kelli Riffle, on Amazon


Gorgeous artwork! This is the kind of deck that speaks to anyone with a love for dragons and dragon lore. I fell in love with it when it first came out, and I haven't used another Tarot deck since.

-- Nathalie Wigmore, on Amazon


I just received this deck and already love it! The dragons are most elegant, intelligent, powerful but not *terrifying*! The combination of dragons and Tarot symbolism may not always be clear for Tarot beginners, but Tarot folks who have a little imagination and love dragons will delight in this deck, and they will come to understand and value its unique messages. I did not care for the Celtic Dragon deck, think it's a bit sappy. By contrast, Pracownik's work has sophistication and edge, and the dragons are just simply gorgeous.

-- Eva A. on Amazon


The Dragon Tarot follows the now traditional path of a 78 card deck.

Each card is individually illustrated with dragons and adheres loosely to the Rider Waite deck for its' imagery.

So what's it like to use the Dragon Tarot? I love it!!!! Colorful, charming, quirky but full of dragon fun and humor. Both the reader and querent will enjoy the use of this deck. The dragon appeals to all with the mystery and beauty. I feel the Dragon Tarot takes us back to a more innocent time. A time perhaps of legend, when man and dragon shared this world. You decide when you take up the challenge of the Dragon Tarot.

-- Kelvin Black, on Tarot Canada

$21.95
Dreaming Way Lenormand
Dreaming Way Lenormand

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DREAMING WAY LENORMAND

I was so excited when I received this deck today!! I had only been able to see three of the cards through the Internet and was anxious to see if all the cards would be as lovely. The answer is yes!! The cards are simple and gorgeous!! The art is a little funky but that is one of this decks charms. The entire package is first rate. The box is sturdy, yet beautifully done. The LWB (little white book/guide book) is so cute. I can't believe they took the time and made such a finely made LWB. The cards are more than I could have asked for. Big simple images (which is important in Lenormand readings) that are whimsical, artful, and fun. I have seen lots and lots of Lenormand deck. I have quite a few. But this deck is my favorite BY FAR!!! Can't wait to try them out!!!

— Customer


I'm a professional graphic designer/art director who studied art and design in college. I know what I like. I also happen to be married to a tarot luminary who is a deck collector, so I do have a fair bit of exposure to the world of divinatory decks.

The Dreaming Way Lenormand is a GORGEOUS package! The production values are off the charts. I find the card stock and solid packaging to be first rate. Definitely collectible. The sturdy box is thoughtfully designed and nicely printed. The booklet has a thick, full-color card-stock cover, and the printing is top-notch. Kudos to the designer. And yes, Lynn Araujo's introduction and the card descriptions are superb. The writing is smooth and lyrical and perfectly compliments artist Kwon Shina's work. This will be a deck I will use while learning the Lenormand system. The reflective quotes for each card are well thought-out. For example, the Garden (20) card has a Charles de Lint quote that states, "I do believe in an everyday sort of magic --- the inexplicable connectedness we sometimes experience with places, people, works or art and the like." All-in-all, the design of both the cards and the LWB are done with a very professional and informed touch.

The cards themselves feel wonderful in my hands. They're printed on thick stock and have impactful imagery. I really dig the recurring cloud motif. The Duchampe-esque card-back is nothing short of magical! The card imagery ranges from very straightforward (clover, house, tree) to more complex art that tells a story the longer you look at it (birds, bear, mice, fish). The Dog card truly captures a sense of loyalty with its unique presentation. Some standouts for me are Clouds, Coffin and Bird. There is a lot to explore here, lending to more expansive readings as the user becomes more familiar with the cards. This is a must-have for Lenormand fans and anyone who loves art that evokes a sense of wonder and playful surrealism without deviating from core meanings as described in the book. As a beginner, both art and writing provide the perfect platform for easy reading with a captivating twist.

— Kort Kramer, Amazon Top 1000 Reviewer


Who can resist the blend of Lenormand cards, Kwon Shina’s art (which I knew and loved from the Dreaming Way Tarot published by U.S. Games), and commentary by the accomplished Lynn Araujo? Yes, I was “predisposed” to like (love) this deck – but I think maybe you are, too!

Anyway, for those of you convinced that there were a limited number of ways the Lenormand cards could be presented and they’d all been done, Kwon Shina didn’t get the memo. Her Bear (card 15) is a person covering his or her face with a bear mask; her Fish (on card 34) seem to be flying rather than swimming, protected from the elements by a large umbrella; her Book (card 26) has an open door carved out of one side. The Fox (card 14) is draped over the shoulder of a woman as if it is her pet or part of her apparel. Exploring each card is a delight and a challenge.

Araujo’s Little White Book is written in a clear, concise style that imparts a lot of information without droning on and on. The Introduction brings us into the process and elements involved in the creation of the deck. I really like the idea of using quotations from famous people to represent each card and the quotations that were chosen. 

Card backs feature a row of houses and a whimsical, jester-type figure in a butterfly mask. The figure is repeated randomly in various sizes and places – in the sky, on the roof, etc. I get the impression that the figures are rising continuously from the ground into the air, pausing occasionally to pose on a rooftop. I suppose they could also be floating downward to land on the ground. Or both at the same time!

The Little White Book includes an information Introduction by author Lynn Araujo, who also provides a two-page spread on each card featuring the card number, title, and playing card association; a quotation; a description/discussion of the card meaning; and a set of keywords.  Araujo’s clear, direct writing style is perfect for seasoned Lenormand readers as well as beginners.

A section in the back of the booklet titled “Reading with Dreaming Way Lenormand” offers examples of a 2-card spread, a line of five cards, and the Spiral Spread, which can be done with any number of cards (ten cards or more seems ideal).

— Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes blogspot


This very sweet deck is the original artwork of Kwan Shina whom you may know of from the Dreaming Way Tarot Deck. The accompanying booklet is written by Lynn Araujo.

This deck differs from so many others, like Maybe Lenormand, in that it is original artwork – no photoshopping a deck here and I so appreciate that.  The colors are light and bright for the most part, no cards in this deck have a dark feel which many will appreciate.

You will also get a vibe that this deck is whimsical, it has an almost fairytale feel to it.  This again will be appreciated by those who don’t like the more “traditional” looking decks and want something more suited for their tastes of a more “current” style of Lenormand deck. The cards all have the playing card noted in the lower bottom of the cards after the cards name, the traditional Lenormand number of the cards is top center.  The way this information was included (and I strongly feel playing card info is needed on all Lenormand decks) was  included does not detract from the look of the artwork which can happen.

I spent sometime working with this and first thing to note is these are poker size cards 2.5 X3.5 inches.  The quality of the card stock is good and the deck does shuffle well – something important – at least to me.  They come in a very sturdy box that will protect them well and I actually used the box lid upside down as a book holder for the LWB as I was getting acquainted the cards.

All in all the imagination and almost dreamlike sometimes ethereal look to the cards is sure to be a hit and I hope enjoyed for many years to come. The deck should be currently available at local merchants by you and if not ask them to order it for you!

—Hugh Irving, World Lenormand Association

$15.95