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Fantastical Creatures Tarot
Fantastical Creatures Tarot

What customers are saying about Fantastical Creatures Tarot

Enjoy Beth Henry's video review of Lisa Hunt's tarot decks

Another creation from a solid tarot team is the Fantastical Creatures Tarot. From the obvious power of the Winged Lion standing as the Sun to the delicate fairy who sit by the Ace of Cups, these cards are mesmerizing.

Hunt’s artwork has long been a favorite of mine. She has a way of imbuing her art with intricate images that demand your attention. She is well known in the Tarot world for good reason.

On the Fantastical Creatures Tarot website, Lisa (who holds a tabby who must have been the model for the Magician) says of painting this lovely watercolor deck:

“These beings are fixtures in our psyches, evoking a sense of wonder with the ability to serve as archetypal references for our own life journeys. The images flowed from my pencil and brush, responding to my own need to depict these magnificent, mysterious creatures that continue to captivate our senses and imagination.”

Physically this deck is standard US Games fare which is to say it is a sturdy deck that you won’t have to worry about falling apart at first shuffly. Two cards are quick reference cards–one for the Major Arcana and one for the Minor. This makes this a great gift deck for someone who wants to learn more about the Tarot who also has a love for all things mystical and magical.

There’s humor abounding in this deck as well. Hunt’s rendition of the Five of Swords had me laughing outloud. I didn’t know the creature but its turtle-like back, slightly cantankerous look set in a swamp captured a contentious 5 of Swords for me. When I consulted the LWB, I was greeted by the Kappa who is a Japanese creature.

Some of the meanings are not what I would call traditional but none of them went too far astray of the area of meaning. One major difference is in the Major most decks name Devil. Here instead we have Fenris Wolf on the card named Chains. Since Chains are a major element of the Devil, it was a good choice in my book. As one of Loki’s children, Fenris has many lessons about why you might be chained.

Circe is a favorite character of mine so I love this image of her surrounded by the animals she so loves. The colors are soft without being bland. While I would classify this an an art deck, it is also a deck to be studied and worked with. It will bring nuances to your knowledge of Tarot, as well as expand your mythological horizons. I highly recommend Fantastical Creatures Tarot.

—Arwen Lynch, Tarot by Arwen


The Fantastical Creatures Deck is one that pulls together in such a fresh, innovative, positive way, it both pleased and surprised me. I am a firm RW/UW reader, and I am generally leery of "dragony" decks. I first saw this deck on Aeclectic, and was intrigued enough to learn that the author was D. J. Conway (Celtic Dragon Tarot), with art by Lisa Hunt in her fantastic style. I went to U.S. Games (the manufacturer) to investigate more, and as a sign from the Goddess that I should have this deck, Lo and Behold, it was on sale for a very nice price! I clicked "Buy" immediately.

I can sum this terrific deck up in one word before going into depth about how informative and positive it is: WOW! The cards themselves are a fairly firm stock, they fit well in the hand, and the back is a lovely beige with an oriental filigree circle that prevents the reader or querent from knowing reversals ahead of time.

Nice extras include a glossy layout sheet with innovative tarot spreads: Changes is a 5-card layout to help deal with change and transformation, and there's also a 5-card layout for present life challenges. Two other very interesting ones are the Pyramid, which purports to show past, present, and future lives (or the past, present, and future in this life), and the Decision layout, consisting of 3 rows of three cards each, which show ultimately what could happen due to the actions we take on the cards (Isn't that what Tarot Reading is all about?).

Although I would classify this as a Rider-Waite style deck, this one is much less ominous. The creators have no reversed meanings, and for each card there is a "magickal use," which involves some type of meditation, or possibly a spell related to the meaning of the card, intended to heal the pain of the querent.

I have so many favorite cards in this deck! They are so well chosen, that some I had never heard of, and I learned quite a bit. Examining the Lower Arcana was a delightful job, and it's difficult to choose only a few to highlight. Gratefully, this deck taught me about the tenga of the Shintu oriental religion (Five of Wands), and also about the female Valkyries (Seven of Wands). I particularly love the Griffin as the Nine of Wands, which neutralizes any negative cards in the layout and enhances any positive ones.

I say "Bravo!" to this deck, and I recommend it to Rider-Waite fans who have been hungering for a little of the fantasy stuff.

— Debra Madigan, Aeclectic Tarot


”The Fantastical Creatures Tarot” was a Top Ten Deck for its year of publication (2007) – for good reason! This is a magickal deck – a portal into other worlds. The basis for this deck is the theme of mythical/fantasy beings, and the myth and lore surrounding them. The artwork is done in a gentle, very detailed fantasy style, using watercolors. There is a mystical, other-worldly feeling to this deck that just draws you in! Lisa’s art is so good, on so many levels – it is hard to know where to begin! One of my favorite things are the winged creatures (and human figures) – the High Priestess as a winged serpent, the Emperor as a winged horse, the winged lion on the Sun, the winged Centaurs on the Chariot, the winged female figure in the Star, the winged figure on the Four of Wands, the winged Queen of Wands, the winged Knight of Wands, the winged Nine of Wands, the winged Page of Pentacles, and the winged High Priest.

The detail in this deck is very well done – each time you study a card you see something new and different! I feel that this deck would appeal to those with a basic understanding of Tarot who wanted to work with a fantasy theme, those who are attracted to fantasy themes/artwork, or those who wanted a gentle alternative/comparative deck. This is a wonderful deck for ritual, meditation or journeying.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


Mystical beings, legendary creatures and mythic animals of all kinds come to life in the Fantastical Creatures Tarot, the fourth tarot deck from artist Lisa Hunt. The fantastical creatures are mostly drawn from cultural myth and legend, with some amalgamations for the purpose of the deck. All are painted in their natural environment (so to speak) in Lisa’s typically detailed, lifelike and beautiful watercolor style, in hues of muted earthy colors with highlights of deep blue. There are the obligatory dragons, winged horses, and unicorns, but also sphinxes, gnomes, mermaids, phoenixes, and minotaurs. Winged creatures feature frequently – winged cats, snakes, horses, humans, fairies,

Those who were drawn to Lisa Hunt’s previous decks will no doubt also enjoy the Fantastical Creatures Tarot. The lack of a full companion book may be a hindrance for some, but the set should suit the intermediate tarot reader who enjoys fantastical imagery and more intuitive readings. 


—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I took my time in getting to know this deck, although I was drawn to it immediately. As its title suggests, this is a deck of fantastical creatures. They come from around the world and throughout time, invoked from myth and folktale. Each has a lesson, or reason for being in this deck, and each in its own way will guide or inspire. What the title of the deck does not indicate is just how immersive these cards can be. This is not simply a "theme" deck - there is a complete world - or other-world - here, accessible to us, as inquiring travelers.

The Fantastical Creatures Tarot offers a connection to the energies of the many mythical beings found within it, and provides suggestions on "tapping into" these sources for their assistance in our lives. This very magickal element of the deck is important - it shows us something that is spiritually alive, so when we read with these cards we may (by our choice, and depending on our beliefs) be doing far more than understanding symbols, interpreting meanings, or engaging our intuition; we might be communicating with certain ancient powers.

Both the artist, Lisa Hunt, and the author, D.J. Conway, have done a terrific job in portraying these fantastical creatures. Hunt's artwork is detailed and accomplished, as well as warm, joyful, ethereal, and transformative. The images express an obvious love she has for her "subjects," and that feeling is rather infectious. The images are full of symbols - some standard for the tarot, some unique to this deck, which Conway comments on thoroughly in the little white booklet. Conway's treatment of the deck is instructional and insightful. She introduces us to each fantastical creature, offering a bit of its history and significance, describes the symbols on each card, and suggests divinatory meanings for when the cards turn up in readings. She also suggests magickal uses for each card, which might entail meditation on a card, or use in a spell or ritual. The little white booklet is quite comprehensive - much information is provided in its small pages. It is enjoyable simply to read about the great variety of mythical creatures in the deck.

The fully illustrated cards of the Minor Arcana exhibit equal creativity and insight, and uniqueness in imagery as well as interpretation. All of the cards come together to form a beautiful whole, and readings conducted with the deck feel touched with the spirit of these wondrous creatures. Included with the deck are two "quick reference guide" cards, and a very attractive, useful layout sheet that demonstrates five layouts and offers tips on conducting readings.

This is a truly lovely set that offers a spiritual presence as well as aesthetic beauty. It is highly accessible, with the versatility to go beyond everyday readings. I would strongly recommend the Fantastical Creatures Tarot.

—Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot


It may seem that the world of Tarot is entirely overrun with copycat decks and deck "creators" who barely know a thing about magick and mysticism. That is not the case with this deck. First of all, this deck is really original. The Fantastical Creatures are not ones you have heard of, at least not most of them. But that is only part of what makes this deck so exciting. The fact is that after more than a decade as a Tarot reader, a Witch, a Ceremonial Magician, and a student the Foundation for Shamanic Studies, I see in this deck that Conway grasps the underlying mystical, magickal sense of each card more fully and deeply than, really, almost anybody else out there who has produced a Tarot deck. I feel that the Fantastical Creatures Tarot is comparable in depth to the Haindl. And the artwork is just gorgeous; the scenes are enthralling, and the quality of the cards themselves is excellent, too. All in all, a great deck.

—Angelina H., Amazon customer


This is a wonderful, mystical deck. I almost did not buy it because other reviews warned "this is not a beginners deck" and that it did not line up with traditional decks. However the deck kept calling out to me so I purchased it. I am a beginner and I find this deck teaches me and leads me to greater understandings.

I would have to agree that this is not a "beginners deck" because it is the most slippery, tricky, insightful deck I have come across. It has a very definite personality. This deck, for me anyway, gives deeply incisive readings full of sassy and sometimes humorous insight.

If you enjoy a deck with personality and are not put off that it has a mind of it's own (very stubborn! - it keeps saying what it wants when it wants!) then this deck is wonderful. It will show you deeply (too deep for most people as it shows stuff you don't want to confront or admit even to yourself!). But beware - this deck is sassy!!!

The artwork is absolutely gorgeous. It does not try to follow tradition, but I find they speak wonderfully to my intuition. The only real break is with arcane 15 which is renamed "chains" but I personally like this change and find it consistent with the readings.

One final warning: those that want to keep their belief in the lie of the material universe walk away and do not purchase this deck. As Friedrich Nietzsche so eloquently says: "When you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into you."

$21.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg  Deck
Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg Deck
What customers are saying about Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg
 
The Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg has an interesting and unusual history with a bit of mystery thrown in. In 1987, Stuart Kaplan, chairman of U.S. Games Systems, Inc. (who publish many of our Tarot decks) saw some artwork that was created by Yury Shakov.
 
Shakov was a well-known Russian artist who specialized in miniatures. His jewelry, intricately decorated Easter eggs and detailed miniature icons were sought after by museums and collectors. At this time, Shakov was recognized as the foremost miniaturist in American even though he had only been in the country for a few years. Kaplan was fascinated by Shakov’s work and decided that he would like to commission Shakov to do a Tarot deck in this distinctive Russian style. It was a few months before the artist would agree to paint the deck. He knew nothing about the Tarot so he had to become acquainted with Tarot as well as develop 78 original miniature paintings.
 
Over the next two years Yury Shakov created the master designs for the entire deck and he painted the Major Arcana and the Cups. When you realize that he painted these cards to size, just as you see them, you can appreciate the amount of painstaking work that went into them. Miniaturists must brace their arm as they work with brushes that are often so fine they contain only a single hair. Shakov loved his art so much that he sometimes worked for 16 hours a day.
 
Unfortunately, Yury Shakov didn’t live long enough to complete his deck, he died suddenly in March 1989. Stuart Kaplan decided to commission a second Russian artist to finish the deck in Shakov’s style using Shakov’s notes and sketches.
 
And here is where the mystery comes in, we don’t know who the second artist is. His or her name was never made public. We also don’t know exactly how much input this artist had in the renderings because Shakov’s notes and sketches have been lost. When you look at the two artists work you can tell a difference in the cards. Shakov’s Trumps and Cups are much more detailed and ornate than the Clubs, Swords and Coins. Shakov used several decks as references, the Tarot of Marseilles, the Classic Tarot and the Waite deck while adding his own touches of Russian art, history and folklore. The deck follows the basic images of the Waite with Russian costumes and backgrounds. The cards seem to focus on the figures while background images are a bit sparse.
 
The Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg is a truly beautiful deck. All cards have a black background but the colors of the images are vibrant. The cards have an oval frame of gold filigree, the Trumps and each suit has a slightly different variation of the filigree. All cards have a thin solid gold outer border. Shakov’s Trumps and Cups don’t appear to feature any one color but the other suits do. You will find purple featured in the Coins, green in the Clubs and red in the Swords.
 
The Trump cards are numbered and titled, the suits are titled. The Courts are the standard Page, Knight, Queen and King. The deck is laminated and printed in Belgium.
 
The card backs have yet another slight variation of the gold filigree frame. All of the suits are represented with a Coin sitting on a Cup and a Sword and Club crossed behind. Sitting on the Coin is a Russian helmet.
Angelfire

This deck is unusual in a few ways. First, it was started by Yury Shakov - he finished number of the cards, along with the preliminary sketches for the rest - but the remainder were finished by an unknown Russian artist at his death. There really isn't much difference in their styles, the continuity of the deck is amazing. Each card is rendered in sharp detail. This includes a border in gold on the face, mirrored on the back. Both the major and minor arcana are done in full detail, and this in one of the first decks I have personally run into printed on a black background. It puts a whole new cast on the deck, gives it a new feel, has a different effect on the spirit.
 
Lastly, even though this deck was not geared toward beginners (or those rediscovering the art) it is truly easy to read. Because of the detail mentioned before, those that do more instinctual reading instead of using the 'given' or 'proper' meaning of the cards are given a clear advantage. For example, while doing the first reading using this deck, the sun in the four of clubs seemed to pop out at me. Normally this wouldn't have been something to notice, but it was pivotal to the reading.
 
The little white booklet is also a nice help. The meaning and reversed meaning are easy to find, and it has the basic ten-card spread included.
 
This is a truly spiritual deck to me, and I'm glad I bought it. As soon as I took it home and got it out of the box, it clicked with me. Meanings of certain cards were coming to me just flipping through the deck. This is going to be the one I can't put down. 
—Cricket. Aeclectic Tarot
$23.95
Symbolon Deck
Symbolon Deck

What customers are saying about Symbolon:

The Symbolon deck is a pictorial representation of the twelve astrological archetypes and their relationships, all depicted as persons. Their content is based on hundreds of therapeutic sessions with patients and draws from fairy tales, mythology, religion and common archetypes.

You should consider the symbolon deck as a blueprint of the author's complete therapeutic knowledge.

It can be used to clarify astrological constellations, but the authors developed a set of twelve spreads to be used seperately from astrology. Ingrid Zinnel even defined meanings for them as "card of the day", with self-empowering statements.

The artist did an outstanding job. No other deck has these amount of breathtaking images.

—Patricia Swinkels, Amazon customer


I love this strange, weird and exquisite deck. I have over a 100 Tarot and Oracles and this is the most unusual one I have come across. The artwork is some of the most stunning out there. such little details done with precision and vibrancy. I can only hope the artist one day decides on doing a Tarot deck. The colors are amazing, this is high-quality printing. There are 78 cards and they are are 3x5 and very easy to shuffle and handle. It's a very substantial and top-notch production in every aspect.

It also has many more uses than the creators very limited ideas of how to use these cards. This is one of the few decks that shows the whole spectrum...from very very dark/frightening to blissfully happy....and everything in between. So many of the images come from myths, folktales and fairytales....it's bursting with archetypes. Many cards are so reminiscent of Tarot images (minors and majors). But it's not a Tarot at all and it's uses run the gamut from inner shadow work, persona/mask identification, relationship issues, storytelling, divination, self-growth, inspiration, creative writing prompts, spiritual pathworking/exploration and self-actualization. As you can see this deck's range is broad and many layered. The sky is the limit as to how this deck may be used. The images evoke some very strong reactions and can set your exploration and imagination off in many directions. You will find this is a deck you reach for again and again.

If just for the exquisite and sublime art in these cards this deck is worth owning, but it delivers so much more. Get it yourself and awaken the muse within.

Rashchupkina, Amazon customer


This is a 78-card deck that is difficult to categorize. It is definitely not Tarot. It is also not a divination system. Perhaps the designer's explanation describes it best:

"Symbolon is a game of remembrance. It allows us to remember things hidden deep inside which have been prevented from surfacing over years and decades.

For those who prefer a psychological approach, you might say the power inherent in the images helps raise the unconscious into the higher levels of consciousness."

The deck is based heavily on Astrology, but you can use this deck with or without the Astrological information. In my opinion, an understanding of astrology will make this deck much more enjoyable to use. Each card has either two or four astrological symbols. Those with two have a planet and a zodiac sign, those with four have two of each and are used as combinations. For example, someone with Moon in Capricorn would indicate this combination with the card that shows a combination of Moon (Cancer) and Capricorn (Saturn), which equates to "The Ice Queen." Other aspects from the horoscope are represented in the same manner. Obviously some familiarity with your chart will allow you to lay out cards to represent each aspect, giving you a symbolic representation of the chart.

The art in this deck is excellent. The scenes are detailed and the colors are gorgeous. The astrological glyphs are in metallic gold ink as is the border on each card. I can only hope that the artists will one day decide to do a traditional Tarot deck. There is a card for each sign of the zodiac, which shows the sign and the planet. Two cards are given for the planets, which do double duty: Venus (Taurus and Libra), and Mercury (Gemini and Virgo). The authors give an explanation for this departure from the norm, which they know will upset many astrologers. Although astrology plays a large role in this deck, the authors emphasize that the cards represent "inner personae", not just astrological aspects. To quote again: "Each of us has a 'MEDIATOR' - a Gemini-Mercury - responsible for communication and contact (and for acting out roles)." This allows for using cards that are not indicated on your chart and makes allowances for those who do not have any previous knowledge of astrology. The cards which represent the twelve signs of the zodiac loosely correspond to the Major Arcana in a Tarot deck in that they "..describe the individual personae as a pure archetype." The remaining combination cards represent "..the great realms of human existence which may combine at any time to form inner personae..." The scenes on the cards are quite evocative and cover a gamut from vampires to religious imagery. Some of the scenes are very similar to cards from the Tarot.

The little booklet that comes with the deck describes two methods for use, one for those who know astrology and one for those who do not. A list of planet/sign correspondences is given for those who need it. The booklet states that there are three ways of interpreting a card - as "the problem," as "the way through the problem" or as "the outcome." The interpretations for each card are divided into these three categories. A "Theme Summary," which is basically a short list of key words, is also given for each card. Finally, black and white photos of each card are shown with the corresponding page for their interpretation. This is useful for those who are unfamiliar with the astrological glyphs, as it allows them a means to determine which card is which. Numbering the cards would have been simpler in my opinion and, in fact I recommend that those not familiar with astrology number the cards and the interpretations in the book anyway. It will save a lot of time in the long run. Those familiar with astrology will find that the interpretations are laid out in a logical sequence starting with the twelve zodiac cards, followed by the Moon and Sun cards, followed by the cards for the signs in order. I recommend this deck for anyone familiar with astrology who likes working with cards. The art is stunning and makes this deck a pleasure to work with. Astrologers tend to have their own interpretations for aspects and the scenes on these cards will not be in agreement with everyone's interpretations, but I think the scenes that one doesn't agree with may give food for thought, or shed new light on an aspect or sign.

—Michele Jackson, Tarotpassages.com

$31.95
Tarot of the Spirit Deck
Tarot of the Spirit Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT OF THE SPIRIT DECK

$21.95
Creative Whack Pack® 6-unit Display
Creative Whack Pack® 6-unit Display

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CREATIVE WHACK PACK:

Roger von Oech has won a loyal following around the country.

-- BusinessWeek Magazine

$96.00
Creative Whack Pack® Deck
Creative Whack Pack® Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CREATIVE WHACK PACK:

Roger von Oech has won a loyal following around the country.

-- BusinessWeek Magazine

$16.00
Tarot Margarete Petersen
Tarot Margarete Petersen

What customers are saying about Margaret Petersen Tarot

Margarete Petersen is a Berlin based painter who has also spent time in Bavaria and Switzerland. She began painting Tarot cards (and Tarot based images) in 1979. Her artwork in this deck is extremely abstract ... often not following traditional imagery/symbolism. The trick to reading with these cards is that you need to back away ... to create a space between the cards and yourself ... and allow the images to come to you. The longer you look at the cards, the more images you will see.

The 78-card deck and accompanying LWB (Little White Book) come as a set in a sturdy box with a lift-off top. The box is a light, light gray, with elegant gold print. The central part of the card The Fool in printed on the top of the box, in a circular, vignette format, with a silver border on the right hand side, and a gold border on the left hand side.

The booklet (3 3/4" by 5 3/8") is 78 pages, and bound. In her foreword, Luisa Francia describes the drafts of early versions of Petersen's cards that came into her possession, and how they differed from the final cards. As those who follow the process of any deck may well realize, sometimes our personal preferences are not the ones that make the final cut! She also makes a very important point in that Peterson is quite good at working with subtle energies, and being able to describe the interplay between energy and matter. With Petersen, and Petersen's sister, Elizabeth, Francia undertook her first Tarot experiments and trance journeys.

In her introduction, Petersen speaks of being very much "at home" in the worlds of myth and fairy tales. Her initial encounter with the Tarot in 1979 reopened a world that had been discouraged in her childhood. She was touched by the symbolic language encoded in the cards of the Tarot. Beginning with the imagery of the Waite-Smith Tarot, she began to look for other images, and other levels of meaning.

The cards are presented without scans, and without keywords/meanings. The meat of the card is presented through a poetic interpretation for the Major Arcana, which is seen as connecting us with story and myth. The Court Cards are presented as speaking for themselves, and of their relationship to other family members, and as representing the "social web" of life. The Pips (numbered cards) are representative of our actions/reactions in the physical world. Each element is described in terms of how is appears on the Physical Level, the Mental-Psychic Level, and the Relationship level. Also given are the boundaries that each number represents. At the end of the book is a short ... two page ... section on reading the Tarot. No spreads are presented. The cards themselves are 3 3/4" by 5 1/2", which do present a problem for those with smaller hands. They are of good quality, card stock with a matte finish. The backs have an orange-based swirling pattern, such that they could not be differentiated in the upright or reversed positions. The faces of the cards have a light gray border, with the card Title across the bottom and the card number, in Roman Numerals, across the top (for the Majors), Title and Suit (for the Court Cards) or Number (in text) and Suit (for the Pips) in dark gray across the bottom of the card.

Some of the Major Arcana have been retitled: The Magician/Magic, The Charioteer/Chariotess, The Hermit/The Crone, The Hanged Man/Trial, Temperance/Mediatrix, and Judgment/Renewal. The Court Cards are Mother, Father, Daughter, and Son. The suits are Flames, Cups, Feathers, and Coins.

While this is definitely an art deck, with its modernistic, futuristic quality, but it is also a deck that opens the reader to the world of spirit. The deck took twenty-two years to complete, and was her whole world during that time.

Some of the cards from the Major Arcana, such as the Fool, The High Priestess, Strength, Trial, the Tower, the Moon, and the World carry fairly traditional imagery, even though they are presented in a modernistic style. Some, such as Magic (the Magician, which is presented as a mask), the Empress (the Emperor, the Hierophant, the Lovers, the Mediatrix (Temperance, which is presented as walking between the worlds of alchemical transformation), the Devil, the Star, and Renewal (Judgment) are quite abstract.

The suit of Flames is done predominately in shades of red, orange and yellow. The suit of Cups is done in pastel blues, grays, and yellows. The suit of Feathers is done in shades of blue, white and purple, with a hint of orange/red. The suit of Coins is done in shades of gold with a hind of blue/gray, orange and brown.

This is definitely not a beginners’ deck. It is a deck where symbols appear where they have never appeared before, and the cards have to be read "in the moment". Look for figures and angles to appear the longer that you look at the card. This is a great deck to read with, but not one that I would use for readings for others unless they chose the deck themselves for the reading. It is a wonderful addition for a collector, or for someone who appreciates art decks. It is also very high on my scale of life for use in meditation and journeying.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


When I first opened this deck I thought… there are no images on most of these cards! Just muted blurs of colours and textures. How in the world could I read with these cards and get any meaning out of them, after all, the words are in German!I sat with the cards and threw my first layout. I allowed the cards to 'flow' from the deck and into the layout. Sitting quietly, grounded and ready to read, I picked up the first card.

Oh my Goddess, there were images within those swirls of colours! I didn't see them at first but there they were. Changing and 'flowing' before me. I immediately became completely enthralled with this deck. I looked forward to my nightly routine of throwing the cards and discovering what insight they wished to share! I found the readings to be very emotional and insightful. Touching deeply on what was happening now as well as shining light on tomorrow. The intensity of these readings were surprising and became something I eagerly looked forward to each evening.

I was fortunate enough to have someone who speaks German in my life and they translated the Minor Arcana for me but I decided to let the book stay foreign to me… I enjoyed the relationship I was creating with them and found the unknowingness of Margarete's intentions to be freeing… it opened me to the 'flow' in a way I truly enjoy. Usually once I finish reviewing a deck it goes onto the bookshelf in my living room while I move onto another. This one is staying by my side! It lights the journey of my 'flow' like no other deck I've used and has quickly become another one of my personal favorites.

—Aleesha Stephenson, Timeless Spirit Magazine

$39.95
Kuan Yin Oracle
Kuan Yin Oracle

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT KUAN YIN ORACLE

The Kuan Yn is a gorgeous new deck illustrated by Zeng Hao, with the accompanying book written by Alana Fairchild. This beautiful collaboration resulted in a deck and book set that is as lovely a treat on the eyes as it is for the spirit.

The cards are all so beautiful, elegant, graceful, peaceful and feminine.  My favorite card is the Lotus Throne (above). When I saw the image of this card online, I had to have this deck. It is beyond gorgeous. I want to be her.

I was blown away with how accurately this deck matched my daily life experiences. For a couple weeks, I pulled a single daily card, and it never failed to align, with minute detail, with what was going on for me that day. The deck reads very gracefully, and the spiritual messages are gentle and empowering. The cards, gorgeous as they are, don't lend themselves to intuitive readings on their own, as they are all very alike. So the book is invaluable for this deck to work its magic. You really do need to learn the meaning behind each card.

This deck has not failed to give me the exact message I need to hear on any given day. Every time I draw a card, I am amazed at how it seems to be written just for me. It has been like having a divine friend with me, knowing exactly where I am and where I want to go and what I need to do, guiding and encouraging me along the way.

The 144-page book that accompanies this deck is wonderful. Alana Fairchild has a lovely voice, and was the perfect author for this set. The author's voice is so comforting, it's as though she channeled Kuan Yin's compassionate and loving spirit while writing the book. The passages guide you lovingly through the difficult times as well as the blessed. You can really feel the divine energy coming through her words. When you read the message, you feel loved, which is an amazing testimony to the power of the author's voice.

I love this deck! Both the cards and the book simply exude positive feminine energy. The images are exquisite, and the book is marvelous. If you are looking for a deck that will channel the Divine Feminine, look no further.  It's been a really beautiful experience working with these cards and book... it's a set I will cherish.

—Kiki, Tarot Dame Blogspot


Back around July of 2010, I had won an oracle reading at a local health and wellness open house, which I went to and was quite impressed by what I learned about myself and my life's journey. Ironically, at that same reading is when I fell head-over-heels with the specific oracle deck the woman used to read me. I had been following this particular oracle and its author since it was published and to say smitten would be a gross understatement!

The oracle deck boasts 44 incredibly beautiful, intricately detailed and soul capturing cards and comes with a 144-page guide book that explains a little about each card in the deck. Each page also provides meditations, prayers and exercises you can do to help connect with your inner peace, beauty, and awareness.

Kuan Yin IS after all, the goddess of compassion guiding us to love ourselves and reach the Divine Feminine.

Aside from the breathtaking artwork, the thing I really liked about this deck is its size; the cards are larger, which is what I prefer when reading myself or others.  I'm so excited to break this deck in and see what advice and insight Kuan Yin and the Divine Feminine have for me :)

—Kayla, The Eclectic Element

$23.95
Whispers of Love
Whispers of Love

 

What customers are saying about Whispers of Love

I bought Whispers of Love in an esoteric shop in my city, and it was love at first sight. So much so, that has become one of my few favorite decks - those that speak to me and give me insight and food for thought about my queries. Whispers of Love is an oracle that speaks to single people looking for love, people who are in a relationship, and for people consulting the oracle on non-romantic love matters.

Part of the reason why this deck speaks to me, and will probably speak to you, is because of the artwork by Josephine Wall. Each card is a miniature piece of art. Intricate delicate and very detailed, the tromp-l'oeil whimsical images have so many elements and details in them, that are incredible helpful in intuitive readings. It is not only what you see at first sight, it is all the elements in the image that you notice when you look at it twice, and those myriad mini-images embedded in the general view. Each cards bears a little sentence summarizing the message of the card and do not have reverse meanings.

The 50 cards in this deck are a bit bigger than the standard size, and a bit tricky to handle if you have small hands. The quality of the material and of the printed images is excellent and the cards shuffle well despite the mild stiffness of the material. I prefer the stiffness of the cards, because it s a guarantee of durability. The booklet is the only downside, as it is very basic and I would have loved something a bit more elaborate.

Even if this deck does not speak to you -and I doubt that’s possible- Whispers of Love is a great oracle tarot to have if you collect decks for their artwork. I am in love with Whispers of Love.

—“Amazonilla”, Amazon customer

$23.95
The Secret Language of Animals
The Secret Language of Animals

What customers are saying about Secret Language of Animals Oracle Cards

 
The Secret Language of Animals Oracle Cards by Chip Richards with artwork by Jimmy Manton is a stunningly gorgeous yet practical tool of divination. By design, the deck gives readers many possibilities for working with the cards beyond connecting with the evocative art and thought-provoking keywords. The cards are organized into five color-coded elemental suits (fire, water, air, earth, wood) with an element card and eight animal cards for each suit. There is a separate card for Gaia as well, bringing the total to 46. The beautifully written guidebook gives characteristics of the animals and elements, divinatory meanings, and an affirmation for each card. The animals featured on the cards are all endangered. For those who feel called to the cause of protecting these creatures, there is a section at the end of the book that provides some suggestions on how one can get involved and information about some of the organizations working to protect endangered species. This an oracle which not only stimulates intuition, but also raises awareness in more than one way.
 
—Mary Brown, www.tarotdactyl.net
$23.95
The Winged Enchantment Oracle
The Winged Enchantment Oracle

What customers are saying about Winged Enchantment Oracle

Tarot superstar Lisa Hunt has joined forces with Lesley Morrison to merge the human spirit with nature’s winged spirits. Her 39 subtlety dynamic watercolors pay homage to the creatures sometimes referred to as the messengers of God.

Whether you use the cards for divination, meditation, or just enjoy the beauty of the paintings, these cards will prove uplifting and inspirational. The companion booklet by Lesley Morrison is beautifully written and explores the metaphor of bird as elevated human spirit poetically but with a clear eye. Each bird represented has it own haiku-like heralding statement (“You are presence. You are survival. You are bold ambition. You are Blue Jay.”)

From condor to hummingbird, the strength of each unique bird is highlighted in both word and paint. This deck will take you anywhere you are ready to go.

—Anna, TarotWise.com


Each card in this deck is associated with a particular bird so by choosing cards we can use the energy of that bird to help us resolve challenges or to get daily advice.  I love the idea of our ideas taking flight!  The author, Lesley Morrison links the bird image to ascension or otherworldly escapades, the fledgling to the master is a wonderful way to think of life.

There is something about birds that both fascinates and repels me at the same time.  This deck has been a wonderful experience for getting to know our bird friends and tapping into the wisdom they carry. Lisa Hunt’s artwork has made me see birds in a very different light-and I hope you will find this deck as interesting as I have.

I recommend the Winged Enchantment Oracle Deck to anyone who has an interest in Nature, Shape-Shifting, Birds, Lisa Hunt’s Art and to those who like to capture the magic of nature in a reading.  This deck allows your intuition and imagination to go wild with possibilities and that’s never a bad thing.  For me the descriptions on the cards read like an intention or prayer.  I like this idea! The Bird In Flight Spread looks really, really interesting and I can’t wait to try it out!

—Mary Nale, Attune Magazine


Birds and their magic are rooted in the collective unconscious, from pop culture’s Maleficent and the Mockingjay of The Hunger Games to the Pagan resurgence of the Morrigan. So it’s fitting that the language and wisdom of birds has been shaped into an oracle deck, with the teachings of each bird an opportunity for journeying, growth and ascension.

In Lesley Morrison’s introduction to the deck she describes the soul taking its first steps toward self knowledge as being like a baby bird: “awkward, stumbling, and rather more partial to the safety of the nest”, with the potentially arduous adventure of flight ahead – self development – often being described in myth as guided by a bird of some kind.

The 39 oracle cards feature eagles and starlings, condors and robins; there is a breadth of garden birds represented as well as birds of prey and ducks, geese, peacocks and parrots. Each bird is described in terms of its spiritual significance, with keywords at the bottom of the page, and the 48-page accompanying booklet features a few suggested spreads for the cards, albeit fairly generic apart from the Bird of Flight spread at the end which I thought was original and appropriate for the oracle as a whole.

Lisa Hunt’s Native American-inspired illustrations are utterly beautiful and have a depth of detail and a mastery of colour that makes these cards beautiful things in their own right, and I’m pleased that the cards themselves are large format enough to let the artwork shine. I was surprised how insightful the cards actually were, in use – coming to them cold and looking at the booklet I thought they might be insubstantial, but I found they supplemented tarot well and worked especially well for overall year readings, meditations or insight into deep motivations and approaches.

—Anna McKerrow, Pagan Dawn Magazine

$21.95