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The Crowley Tarot: The Handbook to the Cards
The Crowley Tarot: The Handbook to the Cards

What customers are saying about The Crowley Tarot Handbook

When starting out with a Crowley Thoth deck, this book is an excellent and comprehensive guide for understanding the extensive symbolism of this deck. Every card is fully described and the fluid, energetic art of Lady Frieda Harris is explained very well. Some beginning and intermediate Tarotists also find value in this book, even if they are not working with the Crowley deck, because of its guide to mythical, mystical, and historical symbolism found in many tarot decks.

—Margaret Ruth, author of Superconscious Relationships


Akron and Banzhaf's text is insightful and oracular, giving diviners plenty of poetic and mythic depth to work with as they discern the meanings of the cards and their spreads. If you're prepared to do the work, this text will at least grant you entry into Crowley's symbolic universe.

—Peter Fyfe, Amazon customer

$17.95
The Goddess Oracle Deck/Book Set
The Goddess Oracle Deck/Book Set

 

What customers are saying about Goddess Oracle

Divination has never been as sensual. This is an absolutely gorgeous collection of Goddess deities ... carefully researched... stunning... uplifting... The illustrations are truly remarkable. It is important to note that these cards are designed to nurture the feminine in all of us, regardless of gender - the Goddess bolsters those aspects of everyone's totality that have been historically disregarded, for example, intuitive abilities, creativity, sensuality, and nurturing skills.

—The Bodhi Tree Book Review


This deck of divination cards is excellent for anyone who is interested in goddesses from different cultures, as well as Tarot enthusiasts, alternative religions, or just in pretty artwork. Hrana Janto, the artist who painted the deck, worked hard to make each goddess both representative of the traditional symbolism surrounding her religion, as well as the various ways women "are" in the world. We have round, full-bodied women, young, old (the Sheila Na Gig is amazing, for example), thin, black, white, and all shades in between. There are women in the deck who could be supermodels, and some who look like they've had (and are proud of having) a couple of children. And all are reverence with the "goddesses in every woman" theory of all bodies and beauties being wonderful. The deck opens itself up for a number of personalized types of readings for the person who is looking for answers. You can use multiple spreads or just one card.

I recommend this deck as highly as I can, and the new US Games version has more durable cards, and are smaller as well, which could work a lot better for smaller hands to shuffle. The fine research into goddess traditions done by Marashinsky is still relevant, and I think this deck & book would make a great Christmas present. In fact, that's how I received it, and it is a welcome member of my Tarot collection.

—Kimberly Wells, Amazon customer


I love pulling a single card to define the goddess energy for my day or ritual, or to choose a working path. As for the cards, they are really beautiful! Each shows a detailed image of a goddess, with realistic backgrounds and supporting characters in the form of animals, plants, symbols, colors, and other people. They also have a key word, as well as the name of the Goddess. I also love that they depict a real variety of women of all ages, from pre-teen to crone, all body types, and different racial types. I’d recommend this exquisite deck to anyone wishing to explore goddess energy in their life or in their readings. The artwork is realistic, beautiful, with a great variety of colors, and although there is some nudity, it is never gratuitous.

—Chloe McCracken, Aeclectic Tarot


Wow!! Such beautiful illustrations, I found my female clients (and myself) have really enjoyed their readings from this deck and have come away from it feeling positive and very inspired to get in touch with the divine goddess within!! Beautiful and powerful cards to work with.

Loudeano, New Zealand


I purchased this card deck quite some time ago. It was recommended to me, by a close friend and mentor, that I consider an oracle deck vs. tarot as a divination tool. An oracle deck seems to allow more room for your own interpretation and use of intuition. I am a psychic medium, currently starting my own business doing readings, and I strongly identify with this deck. The images are all feminine and gorgeous. I adore the artistic style and connect strongly with the fact that each image is of a Goddess from cultures around the world. My readings have been clear and this deck has helped to open me up to my intuition, and to trust what comes through. The book that comes with the package is informative for the beginner and gives information on each individual card/Goddess along with a poem that helps you understand the feeling/message behind the card. Very nice and highly recommended, even just for the artwork!

Bibliophilia Eclectica


I had an amazing reading done with this deck a year ago and finally bought it for myself. It's great! The artwork is beautiful and I find the cards really speak to me. The book is good for a quick overview of each goddess but there's so much symbolism in each card, you can let the images guide you on their own.

­—C. Palmieri, Amazon customer


A very lovely deck and book set. Many will be familiar with Hrana Janto's art -- it has often graced the covers of PanGaia or SageWoman, and she has had a number of calendars featuring her images. I enjoy Marashinsky's writing and her attitude about spirituality. This deck is wonderful for divination and ritual use.

—Audra, Goodreads


The Goddess Oracle Deck is beautiful art combined with well-written explanations for each card in the deck. What amazed me is the accuracy in which the cards and descriptions fit with each reading. It is an amazing deck and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in adding to their existing collection and especially for first time beginners. After much research me and my wife settled on this one and we weren't disappointed, gorgeous, well-written descriptions and accurate.  Kudos to the designer and originator of this exquisite deck!

—Thomas W. Moon, Amazon customer


I own a few tarot and oracle sets, and this is by far my favorite. The artwork is absolutely amazing and easy to connect to. I don't use my decks often, but I love to take this one out to just look at the images. Very strong goddesses, each and every one, and the small stories in the booklet inspired me to look up the history of the individual goddesses as well. The spreads suggested also work quite well.

—Trina, Goodreads

$31.95
The Golden Dawn Tarot
The Golden Dawn Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE GOLDEN DAWN TAROT:

"The Golden Dawn Tarot" is an esoteric deck, based on the systems used by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Wang worked under the direction of Israel Regardie, with card interpretations based on those developed by S. L. MacGregor Mathers. In his foreword, Stuart Kaplan notes that the Golden Dawn Society included as its members some of the foremost occultists and writers of its time. As part of their sacred oath, they were sworn to secrecy. Based upon the esoteric notebooks of some of these members, under the guidance of Dr. Israel Regardie, Wang has faithfully produced, in authentic detail, each card in the Golden Dawn Tarot.

Kaplan sees the publication of this deck as an important "missing link" in the development of Tarot. His suggestion is to study this deck along with other decks that evolved from the work of Golden Dawn members, such as the "Rider-Waite Tarot" (by A. E. Waite and Pamela Coleman Smith), the "Builders of Adytum" (BOTA) deck issued under the guidance of Paul Foster Case, and the "Thoth Tarot", by Aleister Crowley and Lady Frieda Harris.

Wang, in his introductory notes, refers to the "Golden Dawn Tarot" as the only truly esoteric deck ever to be published. It is also the only deck to reach public view that was designed for the exclusive use of a powerful secret fraternity. Included in this deck is esoteric symbolism that has been kept shrouded in mystery as part of the Western Esoteric Tradition. As does Kaplan, Wang notes that this is the deck from which some of the greatest esoteric writers of our age developed their ideas about the Tarot.

Wang notes that the basic design of the cards comes from the work of S. L. MacGregor Mathers, following the framework of the Inner Tradition. Credit goes to Moira Mathers, S. L. MacGregor Mathers wife, for illustrating the original cards. Also noted is that after initiation into the grade of "Adeptus Minor", one of the tasks of the adept was to hand-paint a copy of the Tarot deck.

According to Wang, the purpose of the Tarot is to teach -- teach about the nature of the universe, and about man's relationship to the universe. Wang also sees the Tarot as illustrating the energies of the mystical system of Qabalah. The use of the Tarot for divination is seen as a means to provide an introduction to the visual patterns and subtle energies of the Tarot. In this respect, the true worth of the cards comes from repetitive usage, which helps to stimulate the unconscious and help develop psychic powers.

One spread is given in the LWB (Little White Book) for use by the reader, and it is simply termed the "Fifteen Card Method of Tarot Divination". The spread was specifically developed so that the meanings of the cards could be determined from their relationship to neighboring cards (Elemental Dignities), rather than using reversals. The spread is set out in groups of three, and is not difficult to lay down, or to interpret.

There are 84 cards that come with this deck: the traditional 78 cards of the Tarot, four blank white cards, a card illustrating the positions on the Tree of Life, and a card listing in text the "Key to the Tarot on the Tree of Life". The cards themselves are 3" by 5", of good quality, glossy card stock. The backs have a 1/2" white border, followed by a 1/2" green border, with symbols at the four corners, midway down each side, and in the middle of the bottom of the card. In the center we see a Cross, color coded by element, with a glyph of the Tree of Life in the middle. This graphic alone is well worth study for the symbolism that it contains.

There are some very interesting aspects to this deck, such as the appearance of luminescence around certain figures or objects (the upper body and head of the Fool; the entire body of the Magician, High Priestess; the head and scepter of the Empress, and the bird behind her; the head of the Emperor; the head and upper body of the Hierophant; the head and lamp of the Hermit; all of the Wheel of Fortune; the head of Justice; the head of the Hanged Man; all of Temperance; the Star; the three figures on the Moon; the male and female figures in Judgment; the four corner glyphs and the center figure in the World; the figures in the Court Cards).

For the most part, the symbols and figures used in this deck will be familiar to those readers using traditional decks. The Fool becomes a small child, plucking fruit from a tree; the High Priestess stands facing the reader, a cup held in front of her with both hands; the Chariot is shown as riding through the sky; the Hanged Man is suspended over water; there is a fire in the background of the Temperance card; yods appear in the sky, under the glyph of the moon, in the Moon card.

All of the suits show a stark white background, with a hand coming out of the clouds, holding the requisite number of suit symbols for each card. The Ace of Wands shows a tri-part wand, surrounded by Yods. Included in the suit of Cups is the use of flowers, as well as fish in the Two of Cups. The suit of Swords includes a red flower in some cards, with red Yods in other cards. The suit of Pentacles makes use of a "living branch" -- a branch that shows green leaves, as well as the suit symbol. For all of the suits, Kings are shown on horseback, Queens are shown seated on a throne, Princes are shown driving chariots, and Princesses are shown standing, appearing to be wearing some type of armor.

Each time I use this deck, I see more and more symbolism in it. It is easy to use, would fit well into readings, comparative readings, journaling, story, meditation, ritual, and ceremony. There is a companion book for this deck, written by Robert Wang ("An Introduction To the Golden Dawn Tarot") that is very helpful in working with this deck. For a student interested in studying the esoteric aspects of the Tarot, for someone looking for an alternative deck to offer their clients as a choice for doing a Tarot reading, or for a Tarot collector, this is a "must have" deck.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
The Herbal Tarot
The Herbal Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HERBAL TAROT:

The Herbal deck is beautifully illustrated. For example, the backs of the cards have a sea-green background with a rosemary border. As if marking elemental corners, there are four eight-petal flowers in blue, as well as two red ladybugs and two white flowers. The illustration of the cards themselves are done with the traditional meaning attributed, but also with the herb/plant/flower which attunes to the card. I find this to be even more helpful in understanding the meaning of particular cards. For example, the Tower is represented with garlic, Knight of Wands by aconite, Four of Swords by mullein, Ace of Wands by yarrow. Each of these adds an additional "feel" to the cards that I find are not present in traditional decks. I would recommend that anyone who is interested in both the Tarot and herbs to seek out this deck.

-- Maiden, on Aeclectic Tarot


I do a lot of readings for other people and Herbal Tarot remains one of my favorite decks. I long ago lost the little booklet that came with the deck, nor did I purchase a set with a detailed book. Instead I cross-reference this deck with my large herbal reference book. It has given me startling insights into the physical health of those I'm reading for. In addition, the magical and mythical backgrounds of the herbs add an extra dimension to the reading. I typically follow the same card interpretations that I would with any other deck and read intuitively, but I find that the herbs add so much. I feel I see the whole picture with this deck.

-- Nevada Sierra, on Amazon


What a lovely deck this is! Herbal Tarot makes you feel good to even use it. Based on the original Rider-Waite deck with an earthy twist! I recommend this deck to all nature & plant fanciers and especially herbal growers and lovers everywhere!

-- Violet Tea, on Amazon


This is a wonderful deck if you're new to tarot or are a person who gives "readings". The pictures of herbs are attractive and I have found that even those who are normally uncomfortable with using the Tarot can use this deck and for those getting a reading they are delightfully surprised at how "pretty" the deck is and may relax and enjoy the reading more. It boils down to this ... If you're a beginner the nice clear instructions and interpretations will appeal ... if you've been at this awhile then you know how to interpret on your own and can just enjoy the simple beauty of the pictures. Basic info on herbs and pictures of the herbs are included along with the interpretations. This is just an all around nice deck ... one that, although I have many others since I collect them, after many years I still continue to return to as my favorite. :-)

-- A.C., on Amazon


I learned from a friend with this deck and loved it. I thought the pictures were very clear & revealing. I liked how the herbal remedies overlapped & brought meaning with the readings. The descriptions seemed right on and very accurate. They definitely were very insightful. I'm addicted.

-- Heather, on Good Reads

$21.95
The Hobbit Tarot
The Hobbit Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HOBBIT TAROT:

In this imaginative new deck by Peter Pracownik and Terry Donaldson, Bilbo Baggins heads down the Royal Road of the tarot, following in The Fool's footsteps. The Tolkien-inspired version of the hero's journey is captivating, lively, and emotive. The cast of characters go about their business in their magically illustrated world, simultaneously ignoring the observer and seductively signaling to us that we are welcome to join them if we choose. Each card presents its own mythical world, offering insight, wisdom, and empowerment. Whether you use the deck for readings, for meditation, or just look at the pictures, this deck is a delight.

Pracownik and Donaldson previously collaborated on the highly successful Dragon Tarot and Lord of the Rings Tarot. This exciting new addition adds another star to their collection.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, on Tarotwise.com


The Hobbit Tarot is a 78-card theme deck, following the traditional structure of the Tarot, with the overlaid theme of J.R.R. Tolkien's work The Hobbit. The 22 cards of the Major Arcana are defined as the major mysteries/themes around which our lives orbit (birth, death, love ... things that are universal to all of us), while the 56 cards of the Minor Arcana are said to represent situations and events in life. Traditional titles are kept for the Major Arcana, with Strength at VIII, and Justice at XI. Some of the cards in this deck evoke traditional Tarot well, some do not. The Magician is a card that works, but not in the traditional manner. All of the elements are represented, but we do not have the traditional "As Above, So Below" gesture, and the magician himself, represented by Gandalf, is older. The Hieropant, represented by again by Gandolf, works well. He is working with deep magic through the crystal on his staff, and the owl above him representing wisdom is quite appropriate.

In the introduction to the accompanying LWB (Little White Book), Donaldson notes that the world that constitutes "The Hobbit" is a world of gentle magic and mystery. He likens the journey of Bilbo Baggins to the journey that we all follow in life, clinging to what is known, with a disdain for change.

There is a very special section where spreads relevant to the Hobbit theme are presented, including The Ring of Gollum Spread (giving a great over-view/snapshot of where the Seeker is at the time of the reading), The Sword of Aragon Spread (an expanded Past/Present/Future spread), and The Arkenstone Spread (a spiral spread that is read in storytelling fashion). In this deck we see superimposed on the traditional Tarot a world of Elves, Dragons, Dwarves, Wizards, Trolls, and the occasional Human. This is a collectors deck for those that connect with the Hobbit theme, or those that like mystical, fantasy art. It is not a deck for beginners, and it is not a deck to learn from. As an addition to any collection, it is invaluable, as it stretches the imagination and brings new perspective to the world of the Tarot and the world of Bilbo Baggins.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on The World of Tarot


Tolkien fans will delight to see Bilbo's adventures brought to life in this deck.

Those of you familiar with the Lord of the Rings Tarot deck will find a very different look in The Hobbit Tarot deck. Although developed by the same author/artist team, the cards are much simpler in presentation, without suit symbols or text descriptions. The result is a "cleaner" feel that draws you further into the story of The Hobbit, but presents challenges for effective reading. Because The Hobbit story has more the tone of an "adventure", in contrast to the epic "hero’s journey" so well-chronicled in both the Lord of the Rings and the traditional tarot, melding the story of The Hobbit into a tarot deck was likely a greater challenge for the developers.

The card backs are nicely done, with the elvish runes of The Ring inscribed in an octagonal grid on a dark blue background. The artwork in the cards is dominated by greens and blues of mountain and forest backgrounds. Characters and scenes are depicted in a mainstream fantasy style -- neither too cute nor too harsh. The space at the bottom of each card gives the card title, following the traditional RWS card names. This is important, because few of the cards give any other indication of the tarot relevance. While most of the Major Arcana depicts characters or concepts more or less appropriate to the card’s traditional meaning, some of them illustrate specific scenes from the book.

The LWB also includes suggestions for three spreads. Using one of these, I was surprised at how well the cards "read", in spite of the limitations described above. By letting the artwork speak for itself, without trying to interpret specific scenes from the book, it worked. However, some of the card messages would have still been incomprehensible to me without "hints" from the printed titles. This deck grows on you if you take time to work with it. Those readers who can relate to The Hobbit story as a model for life may resonate well with this deck for routine use. For others, it may work well for those special readings, which probe an "adventure" or pursuit of a specific goal. Certainly, it is a deck for Tolkien fans, and it will no doubt find a welcoming market once the movie is released.

-- Nancy Waterstone, in ATA Quarterly Journal


Since the tarot is itself a graphically represented journey, it is also a handy template for another archetypal grand story—The Hobbit—with all the characters and creatures found in Tolkien’s amazing tale. I read The Hobbit so very long ago…seeing Peter Pracownik’s wonderful illustrations and reading Terry Donaldson’s review for each card, many showing specific scenes, is a special way to both review and comprehend the journey of Gandalf, the Burglar and his Companions, while at the same time finding parallel signposts along my life within the tarot journey. Although small, the companion book is complete with the full set of interpretations, Hobbit references and with introduction, spreads suggested, and information about the author and illustrator. There are meanings given for card reversals; some more involved and others somewhat brief.

The cards are sturdy and long, with an intriguing design on the card backs of the rings of power, superimposed on an extended, modified, Kabalistic Tree of Life. The overall color theme is darker blues, with green and muted bright colors standing out. Each of the 78 cards is clearly labeled and there are many scenes from The Hobbit, including multiple variations of the same event. Human and other creatures, animals too, are rendered fairly realistically, with the artwork displaying a wonderful balance of figure/s and background scene.

I have enjoyed utilizing The Hobbit Tarot, experimenting with the suggested spreads—The Ring of Gollum, the Sword of Aragon and The Arkenstone Spread—as well as successfully finding that The Hobbit cards work in many other spreads (such as the Celtic Cross and the Horseshoe). A set of bright, spotted red toadstools are repeated in the foreground of a number of cards, and the dragon Smaug finds his way into the Tower, the World, the ten of wands, and the Devil. The standard suits are found with the variation of coins for pentacles.

As a storyteller, I love the appearance of the loved, and despised, Hobbit characters; Gandalf, Bilbo, Gollum, the Dwarves, giant Eagles, Wargs and Goblins, and so on. Court cards show generic figures—such as a woman from Laketown—and also at times named characters. Peter Pracownik’s art is described as visionary, and some of his creative graphic symbolism is shown, for example, as the Arkenstone appearing as a crystal with sacred geometry, the repetition in the sky of seven stars, a dark and silhouetted horse rider, rune inscribed stones and artwork showing specific swords—Orcrist, Sting and Glamdring.

I recommend this deck for its utility, beauty and as a fascinating companion to the great work of Tolkien, with The Hobbit being, like our own lives, an Unexpected Journey…

—Thomas Freese, author, art therapist, tarot reader, and clinical counselor

$9.95
The Lover's Path Tarot
The Lover's Path Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT LOVER'S PATH TAROT

$21.95
The Lover's Path Tarot -- Premier Edition
The Lover's Path Tarot -- Premier Edition

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT LOVER'S PATH TAROT

"This is the best deck I have found for love and relationship readings."

—Beth Henry, The Tea Room

$25.95
The Medieval Scapini Tarot
The Medieval Scapini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE MEDIEVAL SCAPINI TAROT:

Medieval Scapini combines the traditional trumps of the early Italian style tarot with the more modern system of illustrating the pips, all in incredibly detailed artwork. While this is a contemporary deck, one would think it had been delivered in a time machine from the renaissance! I personally find the trumps to be the real anchor in the deck.

The trumps all appear over an elaborate golden background and have a luxurious feel. When splayed out across the table in readings they stand out and make quite an impression. While quite detailed, the trumps are also more straightforward in appearance and require less effort to quickly seize their meaning.

The pip cards, on the other hand, are a gold mine of symbols and interpretive sources. Scapini has a way of creating a wealth of imagery in a card that allows your gaze to be seized by one thing, only to then pull the eye from a large image to a smaller one buried within it, complete in itself. For example, you may notice the cup held in someone's hand on the card, then suddenly what once was only fine detail decorating the cup you now notice is a tiny, yet communicative image of a person crouched down and shedding tears. Each time I look at a card I find I've just seen another new detail.

What this means is that this deck is one you will perhaps need to grow with. But I find this deck to be worth the time and effort to study the LWB and the multitude of details on each card. This will broaden your interpretive possibilities for each card. One thing I was delighted to see was that many traditional cartomancy meanings can be found in some of the smaller images on the cards that are not normally part of a tarot card's vocabulary.

For playing card readers, this would be quite a nice deck for making a transition to tarot. For example, the Ace of hearts in playing cards is often given the association of the home, home and family, the source of one's support, in addition to the standard Ace of Cups meanings. In this deck the Ace of Cups contain a cluster of box-shaped objects at the base of the fountain, which look like a small community of houses or homes, thus permitting an easy adaptation to an extended meaning for me in my readings.

Another such example is the 10 of Wands (clubs). This card depicts a winding path along which two men lead beasts of burden charged with a heavy load. Various men wait on the side of the road watching, spying. In cartomancy, the 10 of clubs can also denote travel, business travel, or even owning your own business. This card easily absorbs these meanings.

Yes, this is a very busy deck. Yet this also gives the reader a choice. The abundant details can be studied meticulously, or if that is too much for you, you can simply find the dominant image to give the card its overall flavor and let the rest be atmospheric -- which is what I do with this deck.

A brilliant work!

-- John Alan, on The Tarot Guild


Medieval Scapini Tarot has a special place in my heart. This deck speaks to me more than any other deck I've ever come in contact with, especially the artwork. The pictures have so many intricate details, that they are easy to read.

Look at these cups. Each container has it's own story to tell. And I love that the cups aren't just goblets, these cards are filled with any kind of medieval vessel. On the coins, each coin has a different and unique image. The three of coins has a happy man playing a tambourine on one, Caesar on another and Venus on the third lined up next to a statue of a man who reminds me of da Vinci.

This deck is about a time in Western history that is still held dear today (Renaissance festival anyone?), has detailed images that are full of color, fun and are sometimes very serious. They have gold inlays and are printed on light-weight cardstock in Italy.

I think this deck would be great for beginners. It's so full of imagery that anyone is going to get something from it. And if you don't want to read the tarot but enjoy art, you'll still love this deck, as its inspiration is Medieval and Renaissance art. As for this deck ... I'm keeping it! :)

-- Lilac Wolf

$23.95
The New Mythic Tarot
The New Mythic Tarot

What customers are saying about The New Mythic Tarot

This book is an excellent read for anyone interested in what Joseph Campbell referred to as the Hero's Journey. It's the companion book to a tarot deck, and it's very psychologically sound, as is everything written by Liz Greene, a Jungian analyst and astrologer. This book can be enjoyable read without any prior knowledge of astrology or myth.

—Liz Wilson, Goodreads.com


The theme of this deck is Greek mythology and these myths are used to illustrate the deck and its psychological themes.  According to Sharman-Burke, one of the authors, "Greek myths have been assigned to each card and the stories are intended to be used as a springboard from which to enrich an understanding of the psychological uses the tarot can be put to."

Although not a clone of the traditional Rider-Waite deck, anyone who is familiar with the Waite deck will find some similarities.  The authors of the Mythic Tarot have tried to maintain a connection to the Waite-tradition without copying it.

The four suits in this deck cover four well-known myths in detail:

•   Cups -- the love of Eros and Psyche

•   Wands -- the adventurs of Jason and the Argonauts

•   Swords -- the tribulations of Orestes and the House of Atreus

•   Pentacles -- the resourcefulness of Daedalus against the Minotaur

The cards are simple, warm, and attractive.  I like the simplicity of the cards, which seem to have an emotional expression on a subtle level.  They are pleasing to look at, and they do contain symbolic images, but are done in an uncluttered fashion.  For each card, the accompanying book describes the myth that is illustrated on a card, an interpretation on an inner level, and a short divinatory interpretation.

—Velvet Angel, Tarotwisdomreadings.com


I like the way that the archetypal images of the tarot have been intertwined with the heroes and gods from Greek mythology, which are stories that have resonance with most westerners. This combination of the images and the use of Greek mythological characters to depict them creates for me a synergy of meaning that has great power.

The images on the cards are clear and use rich imagery, which I like as a visual person, because it helps my intuitive understanding of the meaning of the card in the context that it is in the spread. I have used this deck almost daily since I bought it a couple of weeks ago, and have done a few spreads on the same issue. The cards have been very consistent in their message and the appearance. I believe that these cards provide very reliable guidance in my life.

I bought the accompanying book, which is very thorough and informative.  For each card in the deck, the book tells us the story, or stage of the story, depicted on the card (literal meaning). It then discusses the inner meaning of the card and how it might relate to the seeker. It then has a divinatory meaning at the end. For me this deck has really good energy. I am getting to know the cards and this is also helped by the use of the Greek myths. I would highly recommend this deck to anyone starting out or who has an interest in classical studies, mythology, or archetypal imagery.

—Jo, Aeclectic Tarot

$26.99
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
The Pamela Colman Smith Commemorative Set
The Pamela Colman Smith Commemorative Set

Pamela colman smith commemorative set (Tarot) from Tarot Cirkel on Vimeo.

I was giddy as could be when I recently acquired the Pamela Colman Smith Commemorative Set. This gorgeous box set is well done and any tarot lover will want to add this to their collection. The deck is a reprint of the original 1909 deck, with dreamy muted colors and a "vintage" finish that adds an authentic retro feel. There are many versions of the Rider Waite deck with different color schemes (Radiant Rider Waite comes to mind with its bright, energetic colors) but there is something about this version that grabs my attention and pulls me in like no other. Perhaps it is because the turn of the century is one of my favorite eras or maybe the softer color scheme is simply easier on the eye. Either way, I really find this faithful reproduction quite appealing. I especially liked the reversible image on the back of the deck -- a white rose framed by Colman Smith's signature. There is a little blue organza bag included for storing the deck -- another nice little touch that made this set very special.

"The Pictorial Key To The Tarot" by Arthur Edward Waite is a familiar book on many tarot lovers' shelves -- in fact, this was one of the first tarot books that I owned when I began my own journey with the tarot. I had lost my copy and was happy to be reunited with this classic! Even more exciting was the other book, "The Artwork and Times of Pamela Colman Smith" by Stuart R. Kaplan. This biography was small but did not lack details. Her life and family history are thoroughly covered and many images of Colman-Smith's work are lovingly displayed throughout the book with notes that help the reader learn about the mediums that Colman-Smith worked with throughout her life (watercolor, ink, pencil, etc.) as well as all the different places where her work was featured (book illustrations, sheet music, magazines, and more). I was saddened to learn that even though she had great talent, she still struggled financially throughout her life and died penniless due to bad business decisions. I found myself wondering if her work would have been forgotten if not for the tarot. How grateful I am to know that at least one aspect of her artwork is still revered, recognized and treasured!

Lastly, U.S. Games included a fold out with tarot spreads as well as some postcards and pictures, making this kit a treasure trove and well worth the $35.00 price tag! This is a bargain considering all that you get. I highly recommend this set for any tarot lover or fan of Colman-Smith’s work. This would also be a lovely gift for any of the tarot fiends in your life.

I give this boxed set an enthusiastic 2 Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady Blog


The Pamela Colman Smith Commemorative Edition by U.S. Games Systems Inc. has been created to celebrate the 100th anniversary of what is historically known as the Rider Waite Smith deck. It has been put together tastefully and respectfully, and pays honest and true homage to a great artist and her classic decks. Stuart Kaplan has long been known for his outstanding collections of historical and collectible cards. The periodic auctions are the stuff of legends. This is a man who is devoted to cards -- only he could articulate his love into a set this way.

Until previous years, Colman Smith's participation in the creation of Arthur Waite's iconic decks has largely been ignored. But, in 2007, the Association for Tarot Studies published 'The Story of the Waite-Smith Tarot' by K. Frank Jensen, former editor of Manteia (1989-1997), which threw unprecedented light onto Colman Smith as an artist in her own right.

Now, Stuart Kaplan and U.S. Games Inc. do one better by producing a set that lives up the description: "showcasing a lifetime of artwork by Pamela Coleman Smith." This set comes with a Waite-Smith Tarot Centennial Edition Deck as an additional vehicle for displaying Colman Smith's artwork, alongside 'The Pictorial Key to the Tarot' by Edward Waite, 'The Artwork & Times of Pamela Colman Smith: Artist of the Rider-Waite Tarot Deck' by Stuart R Kaplan, six postcards and three large samples of her work, plus a portrait of the artist herself.

The set comes in a sturdy cube shaped case that opens in half like a book tied together by ribbon pulls. The left side contains the books and the artwork; the right contains the deck and the blue organza deck bag. Although a reproduction of the original deck, this version has been renamed as the Smith-Waite Tarot Centennial Edition Deck. The backs are light blue and reversible with one of her roses centered with her signature initials on either end. The imagery is aged to make it look like a deck that has been handed down from generation to generation. The card stock is sturdy but flexible. When the cards pull out they snap deliciously, and shuffle like a dream. This is definitely a must have for any fan of Pamela Colman Smith or a user of a Waite deck in the past, or even anyone wishing to own a very tasteful and respectful homage to one of the great women in Tarot history.

-- Sheri Harshberger, Purple Luna


Pamela Colman Smith is an unsung hero and artist in western occultism. She most famously illustrated the Rider-Waite tarot (I'll discuss the naming convention later), largely based on Golden Dawn symbolism and teachings, and it is probably the most influential tarot deck ever. She was much more than this though, she was a quiet mystic, a member of the Golden Dawn, and a talented artist who received some recognition in her time and was sadly forgotten.

The Pamela Colman Smith Commemorative Set tries to bring this visionary woman back to our lives. The set contains two books, a tarot deck, and some artistic extras, which will all be discussed in their own time. This set was released in 2009 (somehow I missed hearing about it) on the centennial anniversary of the publishing of the Rider-Waite tarot and I think it is great collection to have.

The set comes with The Smith-Waite Tarot Centennial Edition deck. This is not just another reprint of the Rider-Waite deck you’re used to seeing everywhere. First off, to clarify terminology, the deck you see everywhere, and probably have is properly called the Rider-Waite tarot; Waite after A.E. Waite and Rider after the publishing company that first produced it. Some people, myself included, refer to it as the Smith-Waite or Waite-Smith tarot in an attempt to remind people who gave us this deck. The deck included in this set is properly called The Smith-Waite Tarot Centennial Edition, firmly putting forth that Pamela Colman Smith was one of the creators and will not be forgotten. There is more to it than just the name change though, the Rider-Waite deck is filled with bright, almost jarring colors. No yellow is a muted yellow, it is a daffodil screaming yellow, and this is a product of how the earlier decks were reproduced from the original.

For The Smith-Waite Tarot Centennial Edition Kaplan has used a 1909 printing of the deck to restore the deck to its original coloring, something I find far more peaceful and elegant than the borderline cartoon coloring of the general deck. I find this makes the cards stand out more and the subtly of shading and symbolism easier to see and work with. Also, this deck has done away with that gawdy blue and white diamond pattern on the back of the cards; instead the back is adorned with Pamela’s monogram and a rose. It isn’t a reversible back due to the rose, but it is subtle enough that you still can’t pick out which way is up without turning the cards over. Without a doubt this version is replacing my Rider-Waite tarot.

Lastly the set comes with a few artistic extras. It contains six reproduced postcards with Pamela’s artwork, only one of which is an image from her tarot. It contains three 5 x 7 prints of some of her art and a 5 x 7 photo print of Pamela herself. It is great to see Pamela Colman Smith getting the attention she deserves and the deck, the art, and the books are just wonderful. Really a must have for any tarot enthusiast.

-- Kalagni, Blue Flame Magick


First, the deck is only a small part of what is included in this special set. The set comes in an attractive box that opens up to reveal compartments on each side. One compartment holds the tarot deck. The other holds a wealth of amazing stuff, included a new edition of the Pictorial Key to the Tarot, and a wonderful book by Stuart R. Kaplan. Kaplan’s book is "The Artwork and Times of Pamela Coleman Smith." It is one hundred pages of color illustrations and stories about Pixie. We can see her handwriting, read her poetry, and learn more about the woman who influenced tarot so greatly. Pixie finally becomes a real person, rather than simply the talented puppet who rendered drawings for Waite. The book includes primary source material. It is graphically beautiful, and a pleasure to read. That same compartment holds other treats, including postcards of Pixie’s non-tarot artwork, and a tarot spreadsheet. This truly is an epic collector’s edition.

The tarot deck itself is a masterpiece. Of course, we are familiar with the images, and with the structure of the tarot itself. A few things make this edition special, and make it my very favorite edition of this deck for professional readings. The cards are printed on very heavy stock. It is noticeably heavier than an average deck. It’s perfect for a collector’s edition. The card images are re-colored in muted tones. There is a subtle texture, as well. Together, the tones and texture make the cards look antique, as if they had actually been made during Pixie's time.

In a way, I regret reading with my deck at all, since keeping this collector's set in mint condition might have been wise. But these cards are just too tempting to keep on the shelf. My solution is to buy two sets. That way, you can send the postcards to your friends, or incorporate them in art or décor projects. You can read with the deck, use the books as reference, and still have a perfect set in your collection.

That’s right, I am recommending this tarot set so highly, I think some folks will need not only one but two!

-- Christiana Gaudet, Tarot by Christiana

$36.95
The Sacred World Oracle
The Sacred World Oracle

What customers are saying about Sacred World Oracle

          The Sacred World is just the right size for an oracle; it feels good in the hands with slightly rounded corners, and an “as above, so below” quote with a nearly symmetrical image on the back of the cards—depicting four elements within a circle. The cards measure 3 5/8 x 4 5/8 inches, and are just thin enough to easily shuffle. The small box shows the Butterfly card design and the 47-page Little White Booklet includes card meanings. Although reversals are not a part of the interpretations, it does not mean that the unbalanced aspect of each card symbol is not addressed. For example, card 34, the general element Fire, has the following key words, on page 33, “passion, energy, change, make the most of it, but be careful not to burn out.”

            Two card spreads are given, including the intriguing Black Swan, White Swan spread. This five-card spread addresses needs, helpful actions or thoughts, and a “Magic Feather” to focus on a solution. The card artwork is delightful, with the look and wonder of book illustrations. The majority of the figures on the cards are from the animal kingdom, with about ten of the 44 cards showing human or human-like characters. Each card scene is ornately framed to match the four elements and a cartouche-like window at the bottom of the card face allows a quick scan to identify the varying elements in a spread with multiple cards. That is, each little window shows that card element visually; watery waves, red orange fire, blue sky and white clouds, and green vine leaves.

            From dragon to bluebird to crocodile and whale; these are well-loved symbols represented by beloved critters or imaginary creatures. Each card/scene/narrative is enhanced by sumptuous background environment—the bear in the desert southwest, bats in a tangle of tree limbs or glowing fireflies illuminating a midsummer night. The Sacred World Oracle brings varying cultural strands, for Ganesha sits on a lotus blossom in the Elephant Card; Raven is done in the style of the Northwest coastal wood masks; and Dragonfly shows a woman who seems to have stepped out of the Brazilian rainforest.

          The cards, and interpretive wisdom, in this oracle are positive and inspirational without coming off like a Pollyanna. The realistic wisdom blended with mesmerizing, beautiful images would brighten any a reading; take your worries and fears and walk with the Sacred World Oracle. You’ll come through with confidence, awareness and at least the hint of a smile.

—Thomas Freese, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor and Board Certified and             Registered Art Therapist.


Kris Waldherr is one of my favorite artists (and authors!). The quality work keeps on coming with the “Sacred World Oracle”, a 44-card oracle deck based on the four elements (Fire, Water, Air, and Earth), which comes with a 48-page LWB (Little White Booklet).

Waldherr draws from myth, folklore, and nature to celebrate the beauty and diversity of the earth, and to bring gentle guidance into the lives of those that choose to use it. I loved that the point was made in the introduction that the cards both contain the message, and act as the vehicle to bring the reader the message. Our personal experiences act as a frame of reference for interpreting the cards in view of our daily life. We are essentially, according to Waldherr, releasing information that is already deep within our psyche. These sacred cards help tell our sacred stories.

Two spreads are presented – the three-card Past/Present/Future spread, and the four-card Black Swan – White Swan spread.

The deck is broken down into four quadrants, representing the four elements. Each quadrant has animals associated with it:

Quadrant of Earth: Earth, Cat, Dog, Rabbit, Ram, Bear, Lion, Fox, Bull, Snake, Elephant

Quadrant of Water: Water, Whale, Salmon, Turtle, Swan, Dolphin, Crab, Crocodile, Frog, Seal, Carp

Quadrant of Air: Air, Owl, Spider, Dove, Dragonfly, Bat, Peacock, Butterfly, Raven, Bee, Bluebird

Quadrant of Fire: Fire, Firebird, Horse, Dragon, Chimera, Firefly, Scorpion, Falcon, Salamander, Centaur, Phoenix

The cards are presented in the LWB with the card number, name, keywords, and a short paragraph on how to interpret the card.

The cards are 3.6” by 4.6”, which can be a bit awkward for small hands. However, I have small hands, and had no problem working with the cards. The backs have a ¼” white border, surrounding a reddish brown background, with gold icons in the four corners. In the center is a circle, divided into four quadrants to represent the four elements. The circle has a fine gold border. In white letters above and below the circle are the words “ As Above, So Below”. While each quadrant is color coded, I still view the backs as reversible.

The card faces have a ¼” white border, followed by a color-coded border. Earth is a dark green, Water is a light blue, Air is purple, Fire is a brownish-red. An ornate gold border surrounds the imagery, which appears within an arch. The name of the animal depicted, along with the card number (in Roman numerals) is placed in white letters across the bottom of the card. The effect is beautiful – that of looking through a window.

This is a deck that could be used by anyone, of any background, and any age group. It is gentle, bringing wisdom to the reader in a way that it will be accepted.

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


I'm a tarot reader and have never had much use for oracle decks. But earlier this year when I was preparing a presentation on accessing your intuition and finding your answers using tarot and oracles, I came across The Sacred World Oracle by Kris Waldherr. I have always liked her artwork--she designed The Goddess Tarot in the late 90s based on her 1996 picture book of goddess images. And I found her online apps to be useful and to show off the beautiful artwork of her cards. For the first time, I became enamored of an oracle deck.

I immediately liked what I saw in the Sacred World Oracle. The artwork was beautiful, the thematic thread of the deck, primarily nature and animal based, conjured up multi-cultural myths and folklore for each animal illustrated, adding deepening layers to the simple images. And like a tarot deck, it was divided into four suits corresponding to the four elements: Earth, Water, Air and Fire. Here was an oracle deck with intriguing possibilities.

The little white book that comes with the deck provides keywords for each card, and a short paragraph that gives a slightly more in-depth analysis for interpretation. My favorite aspect of the LWB is that for each card it suggests appropriate myths, literature, religious stories, fairy tales, artwork, and even ballets from around the world--fodder for further research.

It seems like dolphins and rainbows are requisite images for oracle decks, and this deck does not disappoint. Centered on card XVII, Dolphin in the Water suit, is a dolphin, breaching out of waves that crash against hull-crushing rocks. His graceful curve and strong tail indicate that he is just playing and can rocket away from the rough water at any time. His friend in the distance leaps up toward a rainbow that reflects the top arch of the card border. This card is perhaps the definitive card of the deck--it uses what I've come to expect as standard oracle imagery, but by placing the friendly dolphin in a challenging position, it gives us an example of how to honor difficulty in our lives, transforming it into a game with the rainbow promise that nothing is too great a challenge.

All of the imagery is gorgeous, but a favorite is XXII, Carp, also in the Water suit. The shades of orange and gold lend richness to this card, which symbolizes financial prosperity. The open-mouthed carp twists in the currents of a shallow, clear stream, broken by occasional rocks and tall grasses. Dragonflies dart in and out. An old, gnarled oak branch adorned with blazing fall leaves cuts across the frame of the image, deepening the perspective.

There are four cards that are analogous to the Aces of the tarot deck. The first card of each suit exemplifies the element involved. I, Earth shows a landscape extending from an ancient, thick trunked tree in the foreground, through hills and valleys into tall mountains in the distance. The colors are greens, grays and browns. Tree tops take the shape of bears and mountains reveal crouching cats. In XII, Water, shadowy marine flora wave in the sparkling currents of the blue and green depths. Contemplation of the image brings the outlines of seals, and perhaps other creatures lurk in the dark deep as well. XXIII, Air shows dim storm clouds and bright lightning. One of the clouds morphs into the strong wings and noble head of an eagle. Flaming orange and yellow mythological beasts--dragon, phoenix and chimera--form the wildfire that crackles through the red and brown prairie grasses and pines in XXXIV, Fire.

Even though this deck functions as a standard oracle, to be read intuitively or via the keywords provided in the LWB, the division of the deck into four suits and the addition of cards that represent the essence of each element opens up numerous possibilities for reading. Laying out multiple cards, you can take note of whether there is a preponderance of a suit--for instance, many fire cards would indicate the need for energy and change, whereas a majority of earth cards would suggest that your goals are being manifest.

This deck hasn't converted me to oracle decks, but it certainly is one of the most intriguing, not to mention beautiful oracles I've seen.

—Joy Vernon

$16.95