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Radiant Rider-Waite® Tarot
Radiant Rider-Waite® Tarot

What customers are saying about Radiant Rider-Waite

The new Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot is the latest offering in a long line of historically accurate decks from Stuart R. Kaplan based upon the illustrations of Pamela Colman Smith. For this very pretty new deck, the artist Virginijus Poshkus was selected to re-color the drawings.

To describe the colouring of these cards as radiant is not an overstatement, as they are indeed shining and glowing, brilliant and luminous, and truly beaming with happiness. The cards have a clean, white border all around the images, with the numbers on the top in Roman numerals for the Major Arcana and spelled out in capital letters on the Minors. The titles and suits are in capital letters, in the same very pleasant typeface, also centered on the bottom of the cards.

The cards themselves have a nice feel, as they are printed on good cardstock, and are plastic-coated and durable. They are easy to handle and shuffle, being sized at 2 3/4" by 4 3/4" overall. The packaging is in a standard size box, printed in complimentary hues of orange and blue to highlight the radiant color values of the cards within, and featuring the Fool and Magician cards from inside. The instructions are familiar, featuring an introduction by Stuart R. Kaplan, and follow the standard format used for all decks from U.S. Games in the Rider-Waite tradition, which is both helpful and convenient for every purchaser of these cards. I was very pleased to be able to add the new Radiant Rider-Waite to my personal collection. Virginijus Poshkus has done an excellent job of radiantly re-coloring the images, which will make them easy to read and use for beginners and the advanced student, and they should soon prove to be a favorite of collectors worldwide.

—Peter Cowen, Aeclectic Tarot


Some people may feel that an "update" to a deck is unnecessary, that too many versions of the same thing amounts to overkill. I often find that new versions do have something to offer, and that this is the case with the Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot.

In the original version of this deck, there is an emphasis on the black outlining of the art, which to me takes away the ability to connect with the cards. The standard Rider-Waite was my first deck, and was almost immediately supplanted by the Morgan-Greer deck, a Rider-Waite clone that I could connect with much more easily.

The Radiant Rider-Waite, had it been my first deck, would have been the deck that I stayed with for professional readings. I like the fact that the intense black lines have been discarded, and the crisp white border with the card number at the top and the title at the bottom. The back of the cards, carrying the image of a starry sky, is also far preferable to the diamond pattern of the standard Rider-Waite deck.

The coloring is much more intense, with more of an orange overtone to the yellows. In some instances (the Fool, for example) there appears to be an aura of light around the figure(s) in the card. You really have to look for this, and I do not feel that it takes away from the ability to use this deck at all.

The Empress ends up with more of an orange sky behind her, but the plant life is distinctly green, rather than the yellowish tone carried by the standard deck. The deletion of the black lines does seem to have affected the facial expressions on the figures in the cards - bringing them out, making them more evident.

The rather gray background of the Hermit becomes an intense blue, which I feel adds rather than detracts from the card. The same holds for the intensifying of the color for the veil behind the figure of Justice. The sun over the mountain behind the figure of Temperance now holds the image of triple crown, which does seem to belong there. The Moon is another card that distinctly benefits from the increased intensity of the coloring of the sky.

The stained glass window behind the figure in the Four of Swords becomes much more of a point of focus, and the little salamander in front of the seated King of Wands has his fifteen seconds of fame.

I find the Radiant Tarot to be a deck well worth adding to my collection, as well as one to offer as a choice of decks for my clients.

— Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


This deck has a close resemblance to another Rider-Waite clone which was also recolorized -- The Universal Waite recolorized by Mary Hanson-Roberts.  The Radiant deck, however, features shades that are richer, deeper, and bolder than the softer pastel hues of the Universal Waite version.

I would recommend the Radiant Rider Tarot to anyone who wants to stay with traditional Tarot, but who finds the colors of the traditional Rider-Waite to be too bland or boring for their personal taste.  Many have disliked the original Rider-Waite deck as being boring or uninspiring, while others don't mind at all.  But now there is another choice to help make tradition more fun, enjoyable, and inspiring.

The Radiant Rider takes the familiar and comforting images of the traditional Rider cards and brings them to life with "radiance."  The recolorization serves to illuminate Pamela Colman Smith's original work.  If you're not in the mood for the traditional Rider-Waite, which may seem too "plain," or you find that you're also not in the mood for the softer colors of the Universal Waite deck . . . then the bolder colors in the Radiant version may be just what you're looking for.

Just as with the Universal version of these traditional cards, this deck presents itself in a whole new light . . . and so, if you've been one to stay away from the traditional Rider-Waite deck due to the coloring used, the Radiant Rider is a good reason to take another look from a fresh perspective.

I know I personally enjoy working with traditional Tarot, even though I also find it fun to venture out with something new quite often.  But the traditional Rider Waite

is how it all started for me . . . and with the Radiant deck now available, it's among my favorites and is favored by many of my clientele in the professional readings I do.

It's just a bright, more colorful . . . and more illuminating experience to read with this traditional deck, which has been updated for modern times.

—Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings

$21.95
Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot Deck
Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot

Graham Cameron invites us to the stage of is Phantasmagoric Theater, the stage of life. There's a script, we all know it and follow it to the best of our abilities but sometimes we forget a line, we loose our context. To reconnect to the original script we have this beautiful and somewhat eerie deck of tarots to help us on the way.

While I don't particularly agree with the theory of predestination I do enjoy the metaphor of life as a stage where we perform a "play" of sorts. I enjoy the image of every human as an actor, or artist creating her/his own piece of art in living.  Lets not forget that the root of tarot is in a game. Which, at least in my view, doesn't take away from the depth and guidance one can find in its symbology but adds to it. For if life is a game, a play, a curtain of shades as Plato would have argued, what better way to figure out the rules is there but to play?

What has Plato got to do with tarot you may wonder? Very little I suppose, but the again maybe very much indeed. To Plato the material world was an illusion, a flawed and unbalanced image of to unchangeable ideas that waits behind the veil of good, beauty and whatever. The point is what you see, what you can touch isn't real (which corresponds with the Buddhist concept of maya), it's a phantasma. "Something apparently seen but having no physical reality; a phantom or an apparition" (dictionary.com). And here we return to possible meanings of the word phantasmagoric, and as a result, a help in interpreting this particular deck of cards.

This was all to give you a background and a spiritual depth to a deck that could be mistaken for childish and naive, and in turned believed to be of less significance then a more "mature" deck because of the style of the artwork. Of course, it is childish and possibly even naive. It chooses a view of the world that's playful and innocent. In many ways, it's a new perspective to life in general and spirituality in particular which I find very refreshing and sound.

The deck in itself is loosely based on the symbolism of the classic Rider Waite deck but with a fresh and personal touch. The artwork is a very modern cartoon style, which I find very appealing. The High Priest has been renamed Grand Master which I think is supposed to correspond more to the spiritual side of the priest instead of the material power (the pope etc) it might allude to otherwise. The four suits are, as usual, swords, wands, cups and (the more traditional) coins. Every suit is accompanied by a special setting. Swords play in the labyrinth, wands at the circus, cups in the desert and coins in a small city. Every card is followed by a short story about the person seen on the card her/his name, what they've accomplished, what they want, where they're going etc.

Sometimes the meanings of the cards correspond with the traditional meaning, but more often the artist of this deck takes his own path. I find it easy to follow his lead and interpret his symbols, anyone who's studied tarot and has mastered the art of interpreting the symbology of this instrument by her/himself should be able to penetrate the symbols of this deck very easily.

I enjoy the depiction of two of cups as a love that is mutual and based un unity but is unhealthy in the way that it's completely shut of from the outside world. The meaning of the Judgement card is given a more modern view as it shows it as the great, big party, as do death seem to dance like life depended on it rendering a positive and affirmative dimension to the issue of "change". I think that the image of the chariot as a flying saucer led by sea horses as both charmingly whimsical and an insightful take on the marriage between sky and ocean, intellect and soul.

I have, and will continue too, enjoy this deck immensely and hope that other will find joy in it as well. It is a very unique piece though and I supposed it appeals to only a handful of people. To those who find the imagery compelling though I highly recommend it!

Evelina Lundmark, Aeclectic Tarot


The Phantasmagoric Theatre tarot encourages us to think of our lives as a stage play. We are all actors, and the scenes have been carefully designed before we enter, stage left. However, as in real theatre, sometimes things don't go right: we flub our lines, we don't like our costumes, or the lights malfunction. These things very subtly change the play itself and can even change the very outcome. However, as Mr. Cameron suggests, "as a tarot reader, however, you can connect yourself through a psychic process back to the original script, and become informed of deviations you may have made to the performance that is your life, helping you to avoid any unnecessary disasters."

Mr. Cameron has produced an astonishing tarot deck as laden with heavy symbolism as any tarot I've yet worked with. Dice, question marks and puzzle pieces can be found in most (if not all) of his cards, and each has a special significance for him. Dice represent entropy or chance in our lives: we may WANT the roll of the dice to turn out a certain way, but often they don't. Like puzzle pieces, we are all interconnected and interlocked to each other in complicated matters. As far as questions, well, I certainly don't have many of mine answered, tarot cards or not!!

The characters in the deck hover in an odd realm somewhere between childlike and sinister. Many look like dolls with button eyes and happy smiles. Some are glowering in a powerful "I know something you DON'T..." sort of way that is almost eerie. When pressed to describe this deck, I often say it resembles something of a cross between the Beatles "Yellow Submarine" and "The Nightmare Before Christmas". Still, this analogy doesn't do the deck justice-there is far, far much more to see.

Many of the cards are modeled after what may be the most well known tarot deck, the Rider-Waite. Since most people start with the Rider-Waite (it's the deck most books use to illustrate the tarot) this will certainly help the reader gain fluency with these cards. However, be aware that the resemblance quickly stops-this is not like any other deck you are likely to run into. Two very short examples of how these cards are different are the card of the Grand Master, a sort of levitating, psychedelic visionary that stands in the place of the card of the Hierophant in most other decks, and the Ace of Cups, which is something of a coffee mug.

—“Chess Heart”, Amazon reader


In my experience, every tarot reader has one or two decks that especially resonate for them and help them to see things they might otherwise miss. I often use the dear old Rider Waite Tarot while giving readings on Keen because most people are familiar with this deck. However, my personal favorite is the Phantasmagoric Theater Tarot. I love this deck because it's colorful, quirky, and full of surprises.

There are so many unusual elements in this fantasy/circus themed deck that it helps me retrieve details I can't see with my other decks. Maybe this is partially due to the modern flavor of the Phantasmagoric Theater. For instance, the Four of Swords depicts a man relaxing in his easy chair, which is chained to the wall in front of the TV. And just look at The Lovers card. They came into the room through separate doors, reflecting their individual lives, rolled the dice to the number six (a perfect match!) and now they're sharing the same space in perfect, childlike trust. The Lovers can choose to exit by the doors they used to enter, or go outside together; and either way is okay. The puzzle piece in the corner represents the mystery and spice of the unknown that keeps love fresh.

If you're interested in the tarot, I encourage you to look around, experiment with lots of decks, until you find the deck that best speaks to you and reflects your personality and reading style. It took me several years to find the one that suited me best, and while I was searching I learned something new and wonderful from each deck I bought and tried out.

—Robin, Empress Tarot Blog

$21.95
Paulina Tarot
Paulina Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT PAULINA TAROT:

The artwork (done with watercolors) is very much along the lines of whimsy and fantasy. The colors are muted pastels, more towards browns, grays, yellows and greens, with the occasional red and orange. The imagery in the cards is a combination of the traditional imagery seen in the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot, and the creatures of spirit that wanted to be included in the cards (this from the author). I did find that each time I looked at a card, I saw something new and interesting. My thought with this deck is that what needs to be seen will be seen each time the cards are read.

I found that the imagery in this deck simply pulled me in! Very delicately done, following tradition, with the addition of many whimsical elements. Each card adds to a wonderful fantasy world, replete with faeries, forests, plants and animals, and unique symbols in the background. This is a deck that could be used under any circumstances, even when reading for children. It would be an excellent addition to any Tarot deck collection.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Certified Tarot Grand Master


Paulina Cassidy has created this delicate and romantic seventy-eight tarot deck with instruction book (LWB). The cards are definitely packed with detail. It is charming, has a Victorian flair, with a hint of New Orleans, Mardi Gras. Many of the characters in her art have a porcelain doll-like quality and are wearing Victorian period clothing.

The deck contains much of the Rider-Waite-Smith symbolism, as that was her earliest tarot influence. Paulina’s chosen modality for this deck is watercolor. The artwork is done in soft, muted shades.

Using this deck gives one the feeling of stepping back into a time of whimsy and magic. It takes you to a place where Dragons and Pegasus fly and many other magical creatures live side by side, comfortably with humans. Paulina mentions in the little white book, that she knows that these creatures exist even though they cannot be seen by the naked eye. You will also note many birds, butterflies, dragonflies, all in magical forest and woodland settings.

This deck would be a nice fit for beginners as well as for the professional reader (especially anyone who may doing readings at a venue with a theme, such as a Mardi Gras party). The deck is also suitable for all ages. It will be enjoyed by anyone who is interested in a Rider-Waite-Smith type deck, but looking for something a little more whimsical.

-- Terri Clement, ATA


The Paulina Tarot is absolutely gorgeous! The cards are an average sized US Games deck, both same in height and width as popular decks like the Fantastical Creatures and Fenestra Tarots. The box is a bit deeper, however, allowing more room for a nicer printed LWB. The cards are neither a high gloss nor a dull matte, but a pleasant "in between" that allows the colours to pop, but not to shine and reflect other lights.

The colour scheme of the deck is what I would refer to as a rich watercolour. Soft in some places and a few tones deeper in others. This is not what one would consider a jewel toned deck, for it has a much earthier appeal to it. This deck nicely reflects the seasons, especially spring and summer. Wildflowers, birds and bees abound, with other creatures both familiar and unfamiliar. Fae-like characters dwell in this enchanted realm and the artist brings us directly into the mysterious hidden world of the garden, field and forest. Drawing on inspirations like New Orlean's Victorian-Era Mardi Gras and the pages of fairytale books, these creatures are donned in whimsical costumes, masques, stars and bells. The artwork is incredibly intricate and detailed and it takes a lot of time to discover the many hidden enchantments on each card. Expect the unexpected!

The entire deck follows the RWS traditional meanings with an exquisite approach, making it highly readable, but the elaborate artwork allows for much development on the intuitive side. The cards have a small white border with the titles written at the bottom, so nothing is lost from the images themselves. Unique, exquisite, charming and thoughtful, the Paulina Tarot is a treat for both readers and collectors, alike!

-- Hearth Cricket, Aeclectic Tarot


Sprightly delicate creatures dance upon branches, while festooned women celebrate around an unusual tree sprouting geometric boxes. Animals from both this earth and an otherworldly one dot the enchanting landscape of the Paulina Tarot as do characters bedecked with colorful early Mardi Gras, Victorian-influenced costumes.

Reflecting artist Paulina Cassidy’s affinity for the city of New Orleans, the Paulina Tarot reflects Rider-Waite-Smith structure, yet imparts a fresh, lighthearted perspective to the cards.

Delightfully detailed and gracefully rendered, the artistry of this deck invites users to come along for a magical ride that, while whimsical, captures the everyday situations, emotions and dilemmas faced in the ordinary world.

I've found the Paulina Tarot to be a playful deck, while still speaking to the inner world (and issues) that often brings us to do readings in the first place (especially when it comes to reminding me not to work so hard and expect so much of myself!).

I love working with the Paulina Tarot especially for personal readings and journaling! With intricate line work, fanciful characters, and muted watercolors, this deck pleases the eye and lifts the spirits. But, truly, it's not just a "pretty" deck; the Paulina deck imparts illuminating wisdom, emotional comfort and pointed answers for those who go beyond its lovely surface.

-- Janet Boyer, The Tarot Channel


This deck is full of stunning detail with black outlines and dreamy water coloured pallet. Even though the art is done this way it is not at all washed out and it is full of vibrant colour. The back features two birds on a cream background, which is classic and feminine.

It showcases many little creatures of the night, quiet gothic looking people and central figures, fae, fairy tale characters and pretty much anything else from a gifted imagination. This deck has a gothic like theme, which will definitely find an audience with young adults, as it is still quiet romantic and not too dark. It has some splashes of Tim Burton and Dr Seuss hidden within her artwork, but it does not take away from her creation at all.

The artist and author of the booklet actually set out to create a Tarot Deck allowing the symbolism to draw her in, this incredibly detailed piece of work took her over a year and a half to complete.

The Paulina Tarot is elegant, detailed and full of stunning imaginative artwork and I highly recommend it.

-- Ethony Tarot Blogspot


The Paulina Tarot was created by Paulina Cassidy, a talented artist who created these cards based on her own personal imagery and vision. This deck does not contain traditional imagery, though the basic narratives of most of the cards are similar to the Rider-Waite deck but Cassidy adds her own elements, such as a frequent use of keys, eggs, and flowing, natural imagery like branches and stars. The overall feeling is one of whimsy and play, but there is much more to this deck than it might seem at first.

These images contain levels of mystery and darkness, which doesn’t come through immediately or if you just look at a few images. For example, here is the High Priestess, my go-to card when I buy a new deck:

Note here the ways that this card is traditional (the pomegranate, the moon, the idea of a veil or curtain), but look at what Cassidy adds here -- with her High Priestess, the veil is actually within the priestesses body. When the veil is peeled back, you don’t get her body, but eyes in darkness, a scroll, and the pomegranate. By putting these “mysteries” inside her body, Cassidy deepens the symbolism here -- this high priestess embodies mystery in a very physical way in this card, not just as a static figure but in her body as well as in the things she carries.

In this deck, unlike many I’ve seen, Cassidy does a fantastic job with the Court Cards, which are not only hard to read sometimes, but also hard to give personality. Like the Major Arcana, the court cards can seem a bit static–they don’t really have a story and represent types of people or emotional states. Cassidy, though, makes each court card unique and fills them with personality and intent. Just take a look at the Knight of Swords, who just screams craftiness, intelligence, and danger.

Overall, this deck is lovely, layered, and contains surprising depth which might not be evident if you focus on the swirling, playful surface. I highly recommend this beautiful deck.

-- Letitia, IntegrativeTarot.com


Where can I start? I have been watching this Tarot develop on the artist’s website for the past few years. Now I hold the finished product in my hand. This is a masterpiece as far as Tarot decks go. It takes the traditional images to a new and very, very, detailed level that should your tastes favor this interpretation, you will find a new favorite.

In the endless Rider Waite clones that get stamped out each year, Paulina Tarot rises above the herd. I generally prefer a very boldly colored deck for easier interpretation. It is true, the colors are subtle and easy on the eye. Yet, they are no less vivid. I adore the delicate lines and layers of every card. This is not my first deck, and will not be my last. I collect decks, most are locked away as art decks. This one is very useable as well as aesthetically pleasing. Your clients get a visual treat, as well as very accurate advice.

Whimsical, dreamy and nostalgic, I cannot stop singing the praises of this labor of love. I followed Paulina's plight in New Orleans, after Hurricane Katrina. Indeed, the frailty of life is reflected in this deck. It will remain near & dear to my heart! If you feel there are too many decks published annually, treat yourself to this one. It is the new pinnacle as far as other Tarots are concerned. Good luck topping this one.

-- Richard K. Kostoff, Amazon customer


The Paulina Tarot is a unique and charming approach to Tarot imagery, with a slyly engaging spin on the cards that visually and thematically owes very little to either the RWS or Crowley canon. Cassidy sinks her taproot into the eerie and lovely realm of the Fey for her creation.

The art reminds one of the elegant "arty" illustrations from the sixties, albeit with a sharply sweet kick. There is also something of the fairy illustrations of the nineteenth century in the endless cascade of detail on each card, which draws one in. Every time one looks at a card one sees something new. A faintly "gothic fairy" feel to the figures with a lot of winks and nudges makes a reading seem a little like a dialogue with eldritch creatures. Even the minutiae is clever, fresh and witty, and the rich yet subdued palate is seductive. There are lots of odd creatures skittering through the cards, all of them engaging without being cloying, even when they are genuinely spooky.

The deck reads beautifully, enabling one to focus on difficult issues with a gentle touch. While not to every taste, for readings or contemplation the Paulina Tarot can be a delightfully unique and endlessly rewarding ramble through a refreshingly non-saccharine fairyland.

-- Thalassa, Bay Area Tarot Symposium


The Paulina Tarot deck just pulled me to it. The artwork is full of whimsy and soft, soothing colors. Each time I look at the cards I find something I missed the time before. These cards are so easy to read and I'm thrilled to have a deck. I would recommend these to everyone. Readers who are just getting started will find these are a very good beginning deck. Experienced readers will enjoy finding new symbols with each new reading. I love this deck.

-- Vanessa G. Coffey, Amazon customer


The Paulina Tarot is a beautiful tarot deck -- it has a dreamlike quality that really connects with your intuition and spirit. I have had this deck for about a month now, and it is truly one of my favorites in my growing collection. I have used it many times, and get very powerful and accurate sessions. This is one of those rare tarot decks which has not only fabulous art, but also much symbolism and detail that really contribute to strong readings.

I love the Queen of Wands in this deck, especially! What a fabulous conception -- the cat is huge and very mystical looking, next to the queen. The two of pentacles reminds me of one of Chagall's circus riders. The Star is especially lovely too. I love this deck!

-- Ravenna Moon, Naples, Italy, Amazon customer

$21.95
Oswald Wirth Tarot
Oswald Wirth Tarot

What customers are saying about the Oswald Wirth Tarot Deck

 This is arguably one of the best and most exciting tarot decks ever published. Created in 1899 by the famous Swiss occultist Oswald Wirth, it is not only a collector's item because of its beauty and artistic quality, but also a fascinating compendium of occultism. Rich in symbolism, esoteric and complete, this is a must for the serious student or collector!

“Bete Noire”, Amazon customer


These cards are geared toward to disciple who is working toward the goal of know thyself. These cards are one of the only decks available which keep the original symbols and colours maintaining their inner symbolic significance. These cards were created by Oswald Wirth at the dictation of the initiate Stanislas de Guaita. These cards when meditated upon can assist us to acquire self-knowledge on our journey of initiation giving us a better insight into our life to help us to progress on our paths with greater ease and speed. One of the most important decks that certainly influenced many adepts and scholars.

—“Seeker of Truth”, Amazon customer

$25.95
OMEGALAND
OMEGALAND

What customers are saying about Omegaland Tarot 

These five stars are not because this is a great Tarot Deck, but because this is a great fun deck. It's like having endless adventures in the grim future if you use it like an old fashioned Pulp Writer's Story Wheel. If you want a deck of cards you can use to prod and prompt your imagination this is the best I have found thus far.

—J.F. Smith-Schroers, Amazon customer


As an owner of 300 tarot decks (yes, each thoughtfully collected), I am pleased to say "Omegaland" is a welcome new addition. The imagery is unique, accessible, thought provoking. I am a fan of post apocalyptic fantasy and this fills the bill. I also appreciate that female images are respectfully portrayed as strong- but not 'manlike'- capable people. I love it!

—Dr. Honeybee, Amazon customer


The Omegaland tarot is an anomalous deck by U. S. Games Systems, Inc. Influenced by the current trend in post-apocalyptic texts, survivalist reality shows, and an epidemic of zombie series such as The Walking Dead, Z Nation, and iZombie, as well as militia culture this unusual deck is set in a lawless society where violence is the rule. It is hard to tell if this deck is a bit tongue-in-cheek or is totally serious, and being marketed to a heretofore untapped demographic – the redneck. Given that this is also a card game that you can play on those cold nights in the bunker complex it may not be entirely humorless. 

So in your a few spare minutes when you aren't out scavenging, looting, or reloading your guns, you grab a bunch of pencils and card 'liberated' from an abandoned school and draw yourself a deck of tarot cards. Your art style is a little rough-hewn, a bit chainsaw art, but your nouvelle redneck compatriots will love your depiction of their crumbling world – Harleys and handguns – this is how you roll. 

This is a 78 card tarot – with 22 Major Arcana and 56 Minor Arcana. In the Major Arcana no Trumps have been renamed, and there are no significant departures from the Rider Waite Smith standard. In the Minor Arcana, Coins have been recast as cans of food, Cups are now water canteens both big and small, Swords have become crossbows, and Wands are now guns. The court cards remain standard – Kings, Queens, Knights, Pages. All cards have both numbers and titles beneath the illustration, in addition the Minor Arcana have a letter and/or number (for the card game) written on a scrap of masking tape in the top left-hand corner. 

The cards measure 72 x 120 mm. The card stock is fairly high quality, solid and inflexible, with a smooth low sheen finish. The deck sits nicely in the hands and shuffles smoothly. The print is crisp and clean, sharp lines, clear colors, no blurring or bleeding of the images. The palette is somewhat military in nature – lots of browns, khaki, olive drab, grey, with occasional splashes of red, orange, pale blue, and grass green. The artists style is blocky and choppy – a studied amateurishness. 

The Little White Book is 52 pages long, with instructions in English only. Using faux-typewriter print, information is given in the first person by your guide through Omegaland. This is an anonymous, masculine voice, full of gruff smarts and survivalist wisdom, that tells it like it is. The divinatory meanings are quite standard, but refreshingly shorn of all esoteric jargon. Each card has a little bit of narrative that explains what is happening in the image, seamlessly melded with interpretations. This is followed by one, or more, keywords that summarize the essence of the card. This is really good information, bluntly put, with no ambiguities. There are no interpretations for reversed cards given. There is a 'Survival Spread' included – a 6-card draw with Location, Food, Weapons, Fuel, Drink, and Stockpile to help the Seeker divine their future. Instructions for the games are provided on a further 12 pages of the LWB and 6 additional cards. There are separate rules for 3 players, for 4-6 players, and free-for-all games. 

This is a truly unusual tarot deck – one of several more masculine decks to appear on the market lately. While much of its symbolism departs radically from more standard images it is still a functional deck. I would not recommend it for beginners, however if you are an experienced tarot reader with an interest in post-apocalyptic landscapes then this may well be the deck for you. 

—MedusaWink, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Old English Tarot Deck
Old English Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT OLD ENGLISH TAROT:

The colors are rich, bold, and deep. The lines are simple, but the pictures are still detailed enough to be pleasing to an art lover. What struck me the most was the background of the major arcana. It is a warm and creamy golden brown with very artistically drawn curlicues twisting through it. What I found particularly interesting was the way in which the artist worked off of some older tarot interpretations. For instance, The Lovers shows a young man trying to choose between two women, often representing virtue and vice, while cupid hovers above them, waiting to let his arrow fly. This is typical of older tarot decks, and shows more of the choice and duality that is inherent in the meaning of the card.

-- Star Daisy, on Aeclectic Tarot


This is one of my favorite decks. I love most things (well-done things!) that are Medieval themed, and this is definitely well-done. It takes me back to the pastoral days of the mid-1300's so much so that I would be bet if they unearthed an English Tarot deck from that time, it would look very much like this.

-- Shalott, on Aeclectic Tarot


The cards are a joyous telling of medieval life, and are decorated with beautiful borders and backgrounds. The artwork is comfortable, friendly, inviting and fun. It also exhibits a talented blending of color, shading, and a unique style. Throughout the deck birds, mushrooms, crops, dragons, horses, fruits, wagons, rabits, castles, men, women and children all make an effective and appealing appearance. Maggie Kneen has taken her inspiration from the historic, and has effectively created a modern deck with her favorite aspects of illuminated manuscripts. It feelsboth old and new, distinctly appropriate for us today. It has definite character, and a spirit that is present but not overwhelming. Additionally, the quality of the artwork is consistent throughout -- it is always excellent. If you like the art here, you will likely love the whole deck.

-- Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot

$21.95
Native American Tarot Deck
Native American Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NATIVE AMERICAN TAROT DECK:

The cards feature soft colors on a predominately white background with black borders. Hand drawn, colored pencil images make up this unique, slightly masculine, southwest deck. The card titles are in English. Suit titles are only on the Tribal Figures (Court Cards) and Ones (Aces). The pips have a individual card titles; for example, rather than the 7 of Pipes it is labeled Counting Cup, 10 of Shields = Harvest, 8 of Blades = Captive, etc.

The LWB does a good job at explaining different folklore and stories associated with the individual cards depicted. It does not have much in the way of divinatory meanings. The Major Arcanas have no reversed meaning. Leaving it to the reader to use the lessons from the stories and the individual card titles for the divinatory meanings. It might not be suitable for a beginner. It is one of the longer booklets I’ve come across. The LWB also includes some Native American history and 5 spreads.

This is not a deck that would normally attract my attention. I usually go for bold color and computerized artwork. But I showed up at a family gathering without my cards and I was handed this deck by my Mother-in-law, to "pretty please do a reading." So I gave it my best shot and I was surprised at how easy these cards are to read. The artwork is simple, but it has enough detail to really get a lot of intuitive information for a good quality reading. The Stars card is my favorite "Star card", out of all the decks I own. It depicts a large spider in the center of a web with small stars scattered throughout the web, reminding me of the dew in the early morning when all seems new and anything is possible.

After this experience I decided that this was a must-have addition to my collection. Anyone that has an interest in Native American decks should take a look at these cards.

-- Patsy Secord, Aeclectic Tarot


I like these tarot cards because I feel they can help give guidance through Native American symbolism and wisdom. You will have to deeply read the book about the meaning of each card and consider it before deciding what it means to you. I think that the fact it requires thought and meditation to actually see meaning is a good thing, as opposed to a cookie cutter or fortune cookie approach. I also like that these tarot cards don't have an occult association with them. They are more based on Mother Earth, tribal and natural symbols and associations. I have enjoyed using them and I think they help me give insight into some situations. Power Path to Love.

-- Dr. Jane Branam, Amazon customer


This is the first deck with which I learned to do readings -- and it is still my deck of choice. The meanings and illustrations provide more room for intuition and personal interpretation than traditional decks. It also gives Native American views, teachings, and history. If you feel drawn to the Native American way of life (Shamanism, animal teachings, etc) or are looking for other interpretations for traditional tarot cards, this is the deck for you.

-- Sam, Amazon customer

$21.95
Motherpeace Round Tarot Deck
Motherpeace Round Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MOTHERPEACE ROUND TAROT DECK:

The Motherpeace Tarot has been a wise and loving oracle. A clear mirror, also, that constantly shows the truest face.

-- Alice Walker, author of The Color Purple


Since I bought this deck a few years ago, it has helped me through immense personal growth. Where most other decks are scary and intimidating, this deck is reassuring, validating, honest and deeply wise.

As far as the feminist messages in the cards and book, I have found them very much based on love, and the perspective presented has been decidedly useful to me. It is not feminist in the negative sense (i.e. "man-hating"), but rather is feminist in the positive sense (loving, woman empowering). Probably there are people who will be turned off by this strong feminist slant, but for most women, I think it is an asset that they will appreciate.

I think that any woman who is looking for a deck that will help her to tune into her own intuition, a deck she can trust with her deepest questions, this is THE deck. Personally, I have not found any other deck that I would trust in the way I trust this deck. It goes to the heart of any question, helping to gain honest, loving perspective, and empowering you to make good decisions.

-- Amy Findlay, Amazon


I collect tarot decks because I like the art and the idea of a spiritual tool for examining the self. I am not trained to recognize esoteric symbols and so many tarot decks have them that I usually give up in frustration of ever learning what they mean. The only deck that has spoken to me personally and allowed my imagination to come up with multiple interpretations is the Motherpeace deck. I was put off at first by the seeming simplistic artwork, but after using them and playing with them for a couple years, they started to grow on me. Yeah, I know, a couple of years is long in this fast-paced world, but instant attraction isn't always the best sign of a good relationship and the decks I found myself most attracted to ended up being empty vessels. With Motherpeace, for the first time, I felt that I could trust my own interpretive intuition and that alone is more freeing than anything else garnered from tarot work. I love it so much that I'm ordering the mini-Motherpeace to take to work with me.

-- A. Webb, Amazon

$26.95
Medieval Cat Tarot
Medieval Cat Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT MEDIEVAL CAT TAROT:

When I heard of the Medieval Cat Tarot I was a little skeptical. I would have thought the market for cat decks was becoming rather crowded and that it would be hard to make an impression, but the Medieval Cat Tarot manages to stand out with its novel blending of traditional and modern imagery and style.

I was pleasantly surprised when I opened the box and began to examine the cards. They are glossy, smooth and very polished in appearance; a little longer and thinner than usual cards but very easy to handle and with a nice feel. The cards were inspired by fifteenth century art, and have the look of the historical Visconti-Sforza. The very consistent artistic style was created by Lawrence Teng, who also worked together with Gina M. Pace (Wicce) to complete the companion text.

The Major Arcana cards feature stately cats with bodies in human poses, their head and feet cat-like in shape but palely human in colouring. The symbology has a traditional foundation, but has been stripped down and reduced of clutter. The Minor Arcana take a new direction and combine modern and standard styles. They appear to be traditional looking pip cards in the background, but in the centre have a kind of porthole. Here, a RWS-style scene has been condensed down its essentials and shows a medieval cat participating in the activity or feeling of the card. Some scenes have been altered to be more immediately clear and aren't a complete RWS clone, but they somehow seem truer to the meaning. The best card of these cards in my opinion is the Seven of Swords -- a blue-dressed cat stands next to an empty and rocking birdcage, empty of its canary but drifting feathers. Others worth mentioning are the Four of Pentacles, a portly cat holding a ring of keys in front of a heavily padlocked door; the Eight of Wands, where a cat stands poised with a note on the end of an arrow, poised to fly, to name but two.

The major cards have standard Rider-Waite style titles, but are without numbering to avoid the Strength/Justice conundrum. Of note is the Empress, who has the significant addition of children, and she stands in a very Hierophant-like pose with her hands on their hands (though it appears somewhat more caring). The Devil is a fox-like creature, expensively dressed and hiding behind a cat-shaped mask. I particularly like Death, showing as it does a robed Death figure who has a feline skull and jaw. All of the feline figures are elegant and well dressed, and no strong emotion passes their face. They are rarely kitschy and never cute -- above all they are dignified, as a cat should be.

The court cards are titled traditionally, but in imagery are a departure from the traditional. They have been changed to more clearly differentiate between each other, with the element develops from the Pages through to the Kings. Each court figure is dressed in a different period costume, and interacts with their element in a different way.

The booklet is small and staple bound, but includes a satisfying amount of information and meaning for each card in English. The card backs have an almost reversible (they are reversible at a distance) design, though they are intended to be read upright. The Medieval Cat Tarot is simple and clear enough to be an easily readable for the beginner and intermediate reader, while at the same time it is an original and polished deck with links to Tarot's history and European tradition. A deck for the cat lover, the lover of the Renaissance era, and most especially for the Tarot reader.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I thought this would be a light-hearted deck mostly for show. I was wrong. The symbolism is remarkably clear and the cat faces don't in any way detract from the ability to take this deck seriously. The images are charming in style, faintly folkart-ish, and it's a very easy deck to read. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants an accessible deck, including those new to tarot.

-- GriffonSong, Amazon customer


I wasn't sure what to expect of this deck, but what I honestly didn't expect was to be as wholly impressed as I am. The cats have not simply been dressed in Renaissance garb or put in tarot poses. They have been depicted to demonstrate precise meanings for the cards, with depth and accuracy. They are not overly cute; rather, they gaze out from the cards with often serious looks of contemplation, and expressiveness that is shown mostly in their eyes. Also, they are not all cat but somewhat human, with human shapes, and hands. One does not have to be a big cat lover to enjoy the deck -- the cats as tarot figures are entirely convincing.

Though the illustrations are based largely on the Rider-Waite, the cards depend on their own imagery. And this they do very well. For example, in the Eight of Swords, a cat stares wide-eyed out from behind bars, which are further blocked by a chain and lock. A key dangles near the cat, though he doesn't notice it. A cat sits with arms crossed in front of his chest in the Four of Cups, three ignored cups before him, and a fourth cup being offered to him on a tray. His gaze is cast to the side. The miserliness of the Four of Coins is indicated in many locks on a cat's door. He holds a ring of keys, but the task of opening the door looks tedious. The sense of being overly cautious, protecting or guarding what one has, is obvious. The little booklet explains the card with good balance: "The Four of Coins shows where we feel threatened by what we have experienced in the past; our security is exercised in overkill because our perception of danger or struggle is much more than the reality. We may actually be safe, but we still feel intimidated. We must realize that our foundation has been laid securely and we may now build upon it." Another good example of this effective use of simple imagery is the Three of Wands, in which our cat holds a small ship in one hand, a telescope in the other. The text that interprets this card for us says, "The Three of Wands symbolizes the ability to see what it is that we are launching and to put it into motion. We carry with us the small tokens that remind us that we are responsible for putting our own ships out to sea if we wish to see our ships return overflowing with prosperity and abundance." The pictures are incredibly clear in meaning, but the artwork is purposeful, rich, and ornate. Interpretation and understanding are accessible, while the aesthetic experience is fully rewarding.

The Majors are not numbered. The artist states simply, "Some of the first tarot decks did not include numerology symbols or a numbering system in the Major Arcana. I have chosen that same omission for Medieval Cat Tarot. As there is some interchangeability with a few of the Majors (most often Strength and Justice), this allows the reader to use the cards at his or her discretion." I will just note -- for those who might be starting out -- that this does not make using the cards any more difficult. A traditional ordering of the cards is presented in the booklet. Most of the Majors stick to expected imagery, though often with a whimsical or lighthearted air -- The Hanged Man reminds me that cats always land upright from a fall, because the featured cat here does not exactly hang upside down as is standard -- he looks ready to land safely if he falls. This seems to intend a hopeful aspect of a card that is sometimes misunderstood as frightening or ominous. The grim reaper in Death is surrounded by butterflies, which indicate personal metamorphosis. It is a purely positive element in what some believe is a difficult card. And the Devil is a fox hiding behind a cat's mask, and makes clear the meaning expressed in the booklet: "It is the Devil inside each of us that this card addresses. We are our own worst enemy -- we bedevil ourselves at the times when we undermine our own best efforts to get clear of the repeating patterns of behavior and abuse in our lives. This Devil, for example, hides behind a mask, much as we hide behind our own denial when we fight ourselves on many levels."

Also notable in Medieval Cat Tarot, is the emphasis on the court cards to provide insight into the self, rather than to merely serve as representations of others. These are presented largely as a progression of the self, which stage one might be in, etc. The court cards can still represent another, but they are clearly described as phases in development, and in this way are quite helpful. An included spread, "The Court Cards Curve," is an aid in learning to see the court cards in this way.

Because of the simplicity in symbolism, the deck would be a super choice for someone just starting out. The accompanying booklet offers more than enough instruction on the meanings of each card, along with added insight and clear ideas for interpretation. It is a highly readable, very strong, and well-rounded deck, in image and word. My own readings with it have been highly useful and insightful. I recommend it for everyone -- except perhaps, those who really don't like cats!

-- Nellie Levine, Illumination Tarot

$21.95
Medicine Woman Tarot Deck
Medicine Woman Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE MEDICINE WOMAN TAROT:

These cards read like a dream, the energy just flows through them and the readings that I have given from using these cards are extremely detailed and spiritual. I find the beauty of the art as well as the colors used allows my intuition to float to a higher level than I reach with many other decks. Animal spirits are lightly drawn in the background and become almost real during the reading. The gentleness of the lines in the artwork is wonderful to look at when reading with these cards.

I love the way that Carol Bridges adds the "usual" names of the Major Arcana on the side of the cards since she has changed the names of the majors, it makes it much easier to understand the majors and see her parallels between the traditional meanings and that of the great spirit, mother creator. These cards speak of Indian beliefs, caring for the earth and each other. Using our intuition to see the paths before us, and the nurturing ways of the mother.

I love using these cards and my clients love to look at them as I am reading for them. The images are not scary or negative looking so I find that my clients are more relaxed during their readings. For example, the "devil" card in the traditional tarot is the "trickster" in this deck. The suits are stones/pentacles, pipes/wands, arrows/swords. And bowls/cups. Every card in this deck has a circle on it, in my opinion, representing the circle of life. I recommend this deck to anyone that is interested in the beliefs and ways of the Native American Indians and enjoys a -- simple, yet detailed deck.

-- Adrienne, Aeclectic Tarot


This deck, created by Carol Bridges, is another treasure. The artwork on its own is gorgeous, being simple enough to appeal and be open, but still being detailed enough to convey meaning in an evocative and very inventive way. Every single thing in the cards seems to have meaning of some sort: Even the way the titles of the Major Arcana are written!

To give a brief background to this deck before I got into details however, I shall say that its purpose, other than to be a deck for people to read with, is to help people, both men and women, regain the feminine healing energy that many people in the West are brought up to neglect nowadays. The creator takes pains to reassure that this deck is not specifically aimed at women only, despite its name, which came about due to the idea of the feminine healing energies that we are trying to reclaim.

It becomes apparent after sifting through this deck a couple of times that the images a figures within them are primarily female, and indeed three of the four suits have women as their 'main characters'. However, this should not be misinterpreted as feminist overtones: As mentioned above, this deck is aimed at both men and women, and includes both men and women in its purpose. The images also show tribal settings, but this is not based around a specific tribal culture: Something that surprised me when I received the deck, as I was expecting it to focus on the Native American culture. This deck has focused largely on what the creator calls "tribes of the future", where humanity has blended what can be learned from the past cultures. It shows some tribal scenes which are quite modern: the people in it are wearing modern clothes for instance, and some which are not modern, where perhaps the character is a Shaman, kneeling in his circle with his tools in front of him. It is certainly a refreshing and interesting blend, and one that distinguishes this deck from most others of the same theme.

Overall, this deck is easy to use once it has been explored, and has artwork which I personally find very open, honest, and attractive. The new titles for the Majors offers the reader of this deck a whole new way of looking at the cards, and the stories played out within the Minors are a beautiful way to craft their meanings. A beautiful deck, and one that I'm sure many will benefit from.

-- Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Joie de Vivre Tarot
Joie de Vivre Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT JOIE DE VIVRE TAROT:

I can review this deck with one word -- "whimsical" -- it's like cute Goth. The colors are in the pastel range, in a way that seems to dampen the gloss from the cards. Shady but definitely not dark. The queen of cups is a mermaid with a blue heart on the end of her tail; she is sitting on a rock delighted by a couple of fish jumping out of a large cup. The water is a grayish blue and the sky is kind of yellow, reminds me of hazy morning light.

The creepy does come through. The queen of swords is wearing a worn dress, messy hair, skulls hanging from her waist and a rickety sword in her hands ... she looks annoyed to say the least. But then you see the Devil and he’s not as scary as in other decks. Oh, he looks mischievous, with his wicked grin and cricket style legs/arms. He has shrunken heads hanging from his shirt and has a person on marionette strings. He reminds me more of a street performer.

These cards are full of so many intricate details that you could spend hours just looking through the cards. They could easily serve as your go-to deck for readings.

-- Lilac Wolf, on Pagan Writers Community


Paulina Cassidy has created the charming Joie de Vivre Tarot. Her style of art, her use of color, her images, are so delicate and perfect! I have not set it down since I received it! French for 'the Joy of Living' the name truly captures that child-like joy and essence.

I have searched through the deck to find a favorite card, to display for my review, and cannot find just one! So being the Pisces I am, I chose 'The Moon.' I also love the night, and the music of the night. Paulina has named Phantasm, with an audience of 3 mesmerized white owls, named Haze, Daze and Maze. Owls, the symbol of Wisdom, just look into their little faces, they are lost in the watery world of stars reflected on the peaceful water of the night. And a colorful dragonfly sitting on the end of the violin, cannot get close enough, I think. How creative and lovely, not a style many may copy! We moon people delight in being different, in every way imaginable. The last thing I notice is the golden glow of the stars surrounding her as she lights up the night.

A lovely lady of mystery, and wonderful card to meditate on. What wisdom do the white owls hold for you? Take time to sit with them awhile, and see what your mediation reveals.

A must have deck for any Tarot Reader. Even the Rider-Waite diehards will enjoy this one, as on each card, is a symbol from the most traditional Tarot decks. You just have to look closely, and see what else is hidden within each playful card. Enjoy!

-- Linda, on Maiden of Mystery


The images of Joie de Vivre Tarot are unmistakably the work of Paulina Cassidy. They are fanciful, otherworldly, and, at times, macabre. It seems to me that in her first deck, Cassidy was trying to hold back just a little, maybe trying to be a wee bit tarot-proper. In this deck, she has given us a full view of the landscapes inside her head.

Many of the characters have sweet faces with big eyes and pointed chins. There is a very Victorian feel to the deck. There are clever elements to the images, such as the clock in the hair of Lady Temperance. While the images on the cards are certainly non-traditional, they make sense, and are delightfully imaginative.

I have a theory about this deck. I think it will be very effective for intuitive/psychic tarot reading. The reason is this. Joie de Vivre Tarot is arguably the most imaginative deck ever. It communicates emotion, and sparks imaginative thought. Imagination is seated in the third eye, or brow chakra. This chakra governs the eyesight with which we view the cards, as well as our psychic vision. By stimulating the imagination and the eyesight, these cards will stimulate our psychic ability as well. Joie de Vivre Tarot will be a great deck for anyone who finds it appealing, from beginners to professionals

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I found this deck to be highly useable and a delight to read with! In the introduction, the author describes the deck as "designed to access child like energy in each one of us to help stimulate, enhance and inspire joy in our own lives". While that sentence may hold true, don't underestimate this deck as some tarot lightweight. I’ve gotten some deep insights and clear answers from it.

I always appreciate the quality of US Games card stock -- once again, this is a sturdy one that will hold up well to years of tarot readings. This is a really important selling point for me. There is nothing worse than a flimsy deck -- but you never have to worry about that with this publisher.

The images on the cards are whimsical with fantastical creatures that convey the messages in a playful manner. From the Mad Hatter-like Magician to the space mouse on the 8 of Wands, this deck is a quirky and fun tarot adventure that will bring joy to anyone who reads with them.

The artist still favors muted colors but unlike her previous work, this time there is a lightness present that creates a soft and pretty hue. The images are easy on the eyes and I did not have to put on my glasses to read with them. There are fine details that merit a close inspection but again, it was much easier on to see them, which was a happy plus for me.

The deck comes with a little white book that includes meanings for each card as well as for reversals (important for me as I am a fan of reversed cards). What I really found delightful was that the author named every character in the deck! There’s Jaunt the Fool with her bat companion Prudence, Discordia falling from The Tower and Nucleus the space mouse on the 8 of Wands with his alien friends Zoom and Boom – and so many others. Cassidy put full on creativity in this part and I just loved reading these descriptions. Often I will ignore the “little white book” but this one was just plain fun to read!

-- Theresa Reed, on the Tarot Lady Book and Deck Nook


"Joie de Vivre" -- French for "joy of living". And yes, this is a joyful, light-hearted deck that brings out the child in each of us -- something that we don't do often enough! In her introduction Cassidy notes that the living beings that occupy this realm are all sentient souls of love who want the best for those that choose to journey through their world. They will help you lighten up in order to better tap into your intuition and connect with Divine source. The Seeker will find themselves responding through heart, mind, and spirit.

The presentation in the LWB (Little White Book) is what I have come to recognize as the style of U.S. Games Systems, Inc. -- text only, keywords, a short paragraph describing the energy of the card, and the upright and reversed meanings. At the end of the book is a unique six card spread entitled "Spreading the Joy", as well as blank pages for note taking. The author bio is something that you will want to read also -- because it is here that you will find that Cassidy has been a student of energy healing for over ten years, and applies her studies in Reiki and pranic healing to her visual art, and that she also composes and records songs. Certainly the energy of the healer comes through in this deck!

The art is very gently done fantasy, in pastel colors. The Fool seems to be floating through the air, and there is a bit of the Mad Hatter in the Magician's top hat. The Hanged Man hangs from a vine in mid air, while the Two of Wands is a lovely muse standing with a globe in one hand, and her owl companion appearing to be sitting on her head.

This is an excellent deck to use with clients that are a little nervous about the Tarot, or to take yourself, or a client, "out of the box" in your reading. It would also be a wonderful deck to use in a comparative reading. The artwork alone is worth the price of the deck!

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


This deck is so well conceived that each card could stand as its own little universe. In readings it communicates in a clear, rich and friendly way thanks to the lovely card images and characters that inhabit them.

-- John Alan, The Tarot Guild


Cassidy adds a new cast of characters to her lively world of inner adventure. These magical illustrations lead us through the traditional 78-card tarot format with whimsy and wisdom. Beautiful to look at, and insightful in its imagery, this will make a good starter deck for those new to tarot, as well as a joyful addition for serious students of the tarot.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
I Cani Originali (Dogs) Tarot Deck
I Cani Originali (Dogs) Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT I CANI ORIGINALI (DOGS) TAROT DECK:

The card featured on the cover of this delightful Majors-only set is number 19, "Il Sole," portraying a bright, sunny dog that reminds me of my Sheltie, Suki, who just recently passed away. If I had to choose a card to represent her, it would indeed be The Sun, as she was always smiling, enjoying life with boundless energy.

All of the images on these cards are straightforward in meaning. A puppy in a jester's cap looks excitedly at a blanket decorated with cats in "Il Matto," or The Fool. He is poised in playful readiness, for whatever adventure or encounter might await. "Il Bagatto," The Magician, performs a trick, demonstrating an uncommon mastery of skills. The Empress and Emperor are crowned, regal dogs, The Lovers a close, furry couple sitting upon a be-hearted floor. Long fur shades the eyes of "L'Eremita," The Hermit, giving him a solitary, withdrawn look, and in "La Forza," or Strength, our pooch proves his strength with one paw placed powerfully on a big bone.

I love all of the cards in this limited edition, collector's deck, but of course, I love dogs! One would find readings with this set a little strained, not necessarily by expecting more meaning from the images, but simply because the images are all so sweet! Even 13, "La Morte" - Death, brings a smile with its Doberman wearing a spiked collar. He stands in an intimidating manner and though he doesn't hold a scythe, one does appear against the clouds behind him. Still, although the meaning is rather clear (and ominous), the card portrays a lovely dog, more than anything else.

The cards are of heavy ivory paper, very artfully produced, and packaged in a hardcover case that ties with a ribbon. As a collector's set for lovers of tarot and of dogs, I Cani is wonderful, and would make a terrific little gift. I keep mine on a shelf above my dresser, where Il Sole can remind me of Suki, and the spirit of dogs. Note: the ribbon on my deck is pale pink. The cards are small in size, at 2" x 2 15/16".

– Osvaldo Menegazzi

$22.00