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The Medieval Scapini Tarot
The Medieval Scapini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE MEDIEVAL SCAPINI TAROT:

Medieval Scapini combines the traditional trumps of the early Italian style tarot with the more modern system of illustrating the pips, all in incredibly detailed artwork. While this is a contemporary deck, one would think it had been delivered in a time machine from the renaissance! I personally find the trumps to be the real anchor in the deck.

The trumps all appear over an elaborate golden background and have a luxurious feel. When splayed out across the table in readings they stand out and make quite an impression. While quite detailed, the trumps are also more straightforward in appearance and require less effort to quickly seize their meaning.

The pip cards, on the other hand, are a gold mine of symbols and interpretive sources. Scapini has a way of creating a wealth of imagery in a card that allows your gaze to be seized by one thing, only to then pull the eye from a large image to a smaller one buried within it, complete in itself. For example, you may notice the cup held in someone's hand on the card, then suddenly what once was only fine detail decorating the cup you now notice is a tiny, yet communicative image of a person crouched down and shedding tears. Each time I look at a card I find I've just seen another new detail.

What this means is that this deck is one you will perhaps need to grow with. But I find this deck to be worth the time and effort to study the LWB and the multitude of details on each card. This will broaden your interpretive possibilities for each card. One thing I was delighted to see was that many traditional cartomancy meanings can be found in some of the smaller images on the cards that are not normally part of a tarot card's vocabulary.

For playing card readers, this would be quite a nice deck for making a transition to tarot. For example, the Ace of hearts in playing cards is often given the association of the home, home and family, the source of one's support, in addition to the standard Ace of Cups meanings. In this deck the Ace of Cups contain a cluster of box-shaped objects at the base of the fountain, which look like a small community of houses or homes, thus permitting an easy adaptation to an extended meaning for me in my readings.

Another such example is the 10 of Wands (clubs). This card depicts a winding path along which two men lead beasts of burden charged with a heavy load. Various men wait on the side of the road watching, spying. In cartomancy, the 10 of clubs can also denote travel, business travel, or even owning your own business. This card easily absorbs these meanings.

Yes, this is a very busy deck. Yet this also gives the reader a choice. The abundant details can be studied meticulously, or if that is too much for you, you can simply find the dominant image to give the card its overall flavor and let the rest be atmospheric -- which is what I do with this deck.

A brilliant work!

-- John Alan, on The Tarot Guild


Medieval Scapini Tarot has a special place in my heart. This deck speaks to me more than any other deck I've ever come in contact with, especially the artwork. The pictures have so many intricate details, that they are easy to read.

Look at these cups. Each container has it's own story to tell. And I love that the cups aren't just goblets, these cards are filled with any kind of medieval vessel. On the coins, each coin has a different and unique image. The three of coins has a happy man playing a tambourine on one, Caesar on another and Venus on the third lined up next to a statue of a man who reminds me of da Vinci.

This deck is about a time in Western history that is still held dear today (Renaissance festival anyone?), has detailed images that are full of color, fun and are sometimes very serious. They have gold inlays and are printed on light-weight cardstock in Italy.

I think this deck would be great for beginners. It's so full of imagery that anyone is going to get something from it. And if you don't want to read the tarot but enjoy art, you'll still love this deck, as its inspiration is Medieval and Renaissance art. As for this deck ... I'm keeping it! :)

-- Lilac Wolf

$23.95
I Cani Originali (Dogs) Tarot Deck
I Cani Originali (Dogs) Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT I CANI ORIGINALI (DOGS) TAROT DECK:

The card featured on the cover of this delightful Majors-only set is number 19, "Il Sole," portraying a bright, sunny dog that reminds me of my Sheltie, Suki, who just recently passed away. If I had to choose a card to represent her, it would indeed be The Sun, as she was always smiling, enjoying life with boundless energy.

All of the images on these cards are straightforward in meaning. A puppy in a jester's cap looks excitedly at a blanket decorated with cats in "Il Matto," or The Fool. He is poised in playful readiness, for whatever adventure or encounter might await. "Il Bagatto," The Magician, performs a trick, demonstrating an uncommon mastery of skills. The Empress and Emperor are crowned, regal dogs, The Lovers a close, furry couple sitting upon a be-hearted floor. Long fur shades the eyes of "L'Eremita," The Hermit, giving him a solitary, withdrawn look, and in "La Forza," or Strength, our pooch proves his strength with one paw placed powerfully on a big bone.

I love all of the cards in this limited edition, collector's deck, but of course, I love dogs! One would find readings with this set a little strained, not necessarily by expecting more meaning from the images, but simply because the images are all so sweet! Even 13, "La Morte" - Death, brings a smile with its Doberman wearing a spiked collar. He stands in an intimidating manner and though he doesn't hold a scythe, one does appear against the clouds behind him. Still, although the meaning is rather clear (and ominous), the card portrays a lovely dog, more than anything else.

The cards are of heavy ivory paper, very artfully produced, and packaged in a hardcover case that ties with a ribbon. As a collector's set for lovers of tarot and of dogs, I Cani is wonderful, and would make a terrific little gift. I keep mine on a shelf above my dresser, where Il Sole can remind me of Suki, and the spirit of dogs. Note: the ribbon on my deck is pale pink. The cards are small in size, at 2" x 2 15/16".

– Osvaldo Menegazzi

$22.00
Albano-Waite® Tarot Deck
Albano-Waite® Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT ALBANO-WAITE® TAROT:

The Albano Waite deck almost screams "late 1960's acid trip." I have thought of the deck as the Rider Waite Smith on acid. This deck is probably not for everyone. It is definitely a product of the late 1960's. I like this deck because of the crazy colors and because I like anything from the 1960s and 1970s. To me the Albano Waite Tarot deck is very unique, has a fun feel to it, and is an improvement on the regular Rider Waite Tarot deck.

-- Erin Parnell, on Aeclectic Tarot


The Albano-Waite Tarot is based on the line drawings of the Rider-Waite, but the colors are rich and vibrant. There are no tints and shadings, just bright expanses of color in many cases. The background colors on the Minor Arcana cards are particularly striking. They include such unusual choices as purple, orange and yellow. Where the Universal Waite is soft and muted, the Albano-Waite is bold and exciting.

-- LearnTarot.com

$21.95
Aquarian Tarot Deck
Aquarian Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Aquarian Tarot

The Aquarian Tarot by David Palladini does exactly what the Tarot should do!!! That is—act as A Catalyst for the floodgates of one's own psychic abilities to open, flow and be directed...Along the path of mans' physical and spiritual life on the earth plane. The Palladini Aquarian deck offers all of the important symbolism for each card in an obvious ANd Mystical manner - allowing the reader to be lead psychically down the correct path. Unlike many other "Pretty" & "Weird" decks which abound - the Aquarian deck does not keep you spell bound to the cards themselves trying to decipher them but rather their meanings being instantly recognized by the reader, does it's job by sending our psyche away from the cards and directly into the cosmos of transmitted visuals and thought communications from the universe. Transmittals relevant to the questions being posed by the client. I'm on my 3rd deck of Pallidini's and have never found another to replace them!

—KosmicLinda (professional reader of 35 years)


This deck is old by many standards but the artwork still remains rather unique and revealing in many ways. It has an 'ancient' feel but also a 'modern' feel that many enjoyed getting readings with and is a sure winner for a primer deck!

Yukio, Amazon customer


David Palladini's Aquarian Tarot is a beautiful deck in the Rider-Waite tradition. I was attracted to it by the wonderful art-deco style and the watercolors, both of which appeal to my sensibilities. This deck is very emotive - there's a strong sense of feeling that emanates from these cards, and it is often that feeling, rather than the imagery depicted, that informs my reading with them.

—R. Perkins, Amazon customer

$21.95
Brotherhood of Light Egyptian Tarot
Brotherhood of Light Egyptian Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT BROTHERHOOD OF LIGHT EGYPTIAN TAROT:

I loved the coloring in this deck, which is pastels of yellow, green, blue and orange. The theme is, of course, Egyptian, with the artwork being very minimalist. The Minor Arcana are Marseilles style, showing icons only. I liked the arrangement of the icons: Aces are the icon standing alone -- no hand coming out of the clouds here. For the Deuces, the Scepters and Swords are crossed, while the Cups and Coins are side by side. The treys are all in the form of a triangle, while the Four’s are in the form of a square. The Fives are all grouped together, with the Scepters and Swords crossed, and the Cups and Coins both form “X’x”. The Six’s show two triangles, while the Seven’s show an upper triangle and a lower square. The Eight’s show two squares, while the Nine’s show three triangles. The Ten’s show two triangles and a square.

The only figures facing forward in this deck are the King of Coins, the King of Cups, the Veiled Isis, and the male figure in The Two Paths, The esoteric imagery in this deck is blended in well -- the Magician’s table is a cube, Isis Unveiled and the Sovereign sitting on cubes, the Charioteer has a sword in his right hand and a scepter in his left hand and so on. It is interesting to note that the Martyr has his hands tied at the wrist, instead of being free. I love that The Reaper has a beautiful rainbow over his head! The Black Magician shows a crocodile-like figure with wings, holding a flaming torch with what appears to be a snake in front of him. The Tower, of course, is depicted as a pyramid. The two mountains in The Moon have been replaced with pyramids. The Sun shows two adults, as opposed to two children. I adore The Sarcophagus, which shows a male figure, a female figure, and a child’s figure, wrapped as mummies, coming out of a sarcophagus! Instead of a dog, The Materialist gets a crocodile-like companion also.

I love this deck -- the coloring and minimalist imagery brings me a sense of peace. I would advise, however, that it be used with the companion book (which I need to purchase!). It would be of interest as a theme deck (Egyptian), for the artwork (Egyptian minimalist), as a collector’s deck, or as a reading deck for someone with a basic knowledge of the Tarot.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, http://tinyurl.com/36xyozk


US Games Systems has just released a color deck of The Brotherhood of Light Egyptian Tarot Cards. These cards are simply rich -- from the mythology, symbols, astrology, Hebrew characters, numerology and the teachings of the Kabbalah -- each one is a feast to feed one's mind and soul.

I recently received the deck with it's little instruction booklet, and just the key on the front makes me giddy. The circle of the key is divided into the four suits with the numbers 1 through 9 corresponding to planetary positions within constellations. For example, 3 of Swords (or Trey of swords, I love the old-fashioned aspects of this deck) shows Mercury, Capricorn and Virgo. The post of the key contain the major arcana, while the teeth contain the court cards.

Rather than going through the suits, the section on the minor arcana goes through the numbers, associating each with a particular planet, giving the divinatory significance of each card as well as its' inner interpretation. Following the Hermetic tradition, the cards an integral part of an internally consistent exposition of occult sciences. Astrology, alchemy and magic are continuously expressed through color, symbol and glyph. Each card is actually a cartouche, containing a message for the seeker.

"What the tarot can be made to reveal is limited only by the capacity for understanding of the person using it " (from the booklet). I have been really enjoying playing with this new deck as it synthesized my own interests in both tarot and astrology. Having the planets and signs expressed on each card gives me instant access to more information that I can share with my client.

It's been 23 years now that I have been courting the cards. Receiving The Brotherhood of Light Egyptian Tarot Cards cards reminds me that the Tarot itself is a lifetime romance ...

-- Kayla Garnet Rose, Enchanted World of a Rambling Rose blog


One of the things I really love about the method used with this deck is how the Horsemen are portrayed. The Horsemen are placed in the deck where we usually see Knights. However, they play an interesting role in the deck: "The Horsemen do not represent people, but denote thoughts or unseen intelligences. In divination they are read as thoughts or intelligences that have an influence upon the life of the client."

Surprisingly, even though the Minors required me to refer to the LWB, the readings were accurate. I didn't expect the deck to read as well as it does, considering I have to look up the meanings for most cards. So even if one is not yet familiar with the method used for the Minors, it doesn't mean accurate readings can't be given.

The LWB

The Little White Book is 48 pages. It begins with an introduction to the deck and information about the cards' back design. The Major Arcana are each given a keyword or two, along with interpretations for the Spiritual, Intellectual and Physical meanings. This is followed by a sort of old world, sometimes enigmatic, message.

The Minors are arranged in the book by numbers: all Twos together, all Threes together, etc. There is a paragraph describing the celestial correspondence with each number, along with the various areas of influence the number covers. Then each card is given a simple divinatory and inner interpretation.

Final Thoughts

I was honestly surprised that I received good readings out of this deck, simply because I had dismissed it at first as "another Egyptian deck" that I (personally) wouldn't relate with or understand. Not being interested in Egyptian decks, I didn't think I would get anything useful out of this deck, and I'm glad to say I was wrong.

I can definitely see the benefit of learning this interesting system sometime in the future when I have more time to devote to it. Overall, I was unexpectedly impressed with this deck, and that's saying a lot. I thoroughly enjoyed the surprises I would get when I'd flip to the book and read such accurate descriptions of what I had asked the cards about. And I absolutely love the role the Horsemen play in the deck.

I would definitely recommend this deck to anyone who isn't afraid to learn a new system, or refer to the LWB for readings. If you do have the time and interest in learning the method, I assume the book (The Sacred Tarot) would be a wise accompanying investment.

-- Tarotdame.blogspot.com

$21.95
Cat's Eye Tarot
Cat's Eye Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CAT'S EYE TAROT:

The Cat's Eye Tarot has a lovely, fresh, uncluttered feel to it, with a subtle realism to the artwork. Debra has also taken great care to depict the same color combinations throughout each suit, such as all oranges and yellows for the Wands, and all plush pinks and reds for the Cups. The same kind of cat graces each suit as well: red tabbies for the Wands, Siamese cats for the Swords , brown tabbies for Pentacles and black and white cats for Cups. These are clever choices, as anybody who knows these different types of cats will tell you. Siamese cats, for instance, are known for being vocal and talkative, whereas red tabbies, or ginger cats, are often more assertive, larger, and independent. These nuances make the Cat's Eye Tarot brilliant for any beginner to read with, as they aren’t esoteric or occult, but rather express the nature of each suit simply.

The deck comes with a lovely spread to try: the Nine Lives Tarot spread. It's fun, insightful and charming, just like the Cat's Eye Tarot itself. Overall, the Cat's Eye Tarot is very cute, clear and easy to read, with brilliant Minor Arcana in particular that make it a great deck for beginners but also a wonderful addition to any experienced reader's collection.

The Major Arcana are quite clever, in that sometimes the cards feature the traditional symbolism, but hidden in the card in a way that is in context for the deck’s theme. In The Hierophant, for instance, a big ginger tomcat stands proudly on a desk in a study filled with books. Veterinary textbooks sit in a pile on the desk, along with a computer and a set of keys -- the keys found originally in the traditional Hierophant image. This is an innovative, modern and accessible way of expressing the card's meanings of learning from authority, or received wisdom: the veterinary student's cat. The Devil is another example of the card meanings made applicable not only to cats but to the modern world: an obese cat eating yet more food that he doesn't need.

The strength of this deck really lies in its Minor Arcana, which are not only extremely easy to read, but also express the feline point of view of the card meanings without making them obscure. They're also extremely cute, in places funny, at times sad and tear-inducing (particularly for us "cat people"!) and beautiful. The traditional card meanings are innovatively illustrated, which means that the Cat's Eye Tarot is a good deck for more advanced readers to look at and use to shake themselves out of old, tired reading habits or to gain new perspectives and insights into the cards.

-- The Tarot Review


If you have ever shared your life with one cat or many, you already know just how individualistic they are. Much like people (some would say more like women than men) they each have their own, very distinguishable personalities. But, unlike their human counterparts, they are more straightforward with showing you who they really are. However, you don’t need to be a "cat lover" necessarily to connect with and use the Cat's Eye Tarot.

I found the Cat's Eye Tarot to be quite engaging, playful, and very much to the point when it was called for. Cat's have a language all their own, and yet, it can be easily understood. They have as many diverse personalities as any group of "humans" and that is evident in each and every cat that is depicted on every card.

No longer skeptical about a cat themed working deck, I would recommend this one not only to cat lovers, but also to Tarot enthusiasts of all experience levels.

-- Koneta Bailey, on New Paths Tarot


Debra Givin refers to her deck as "uncluttered" in the LWB and I completely agree. The illustrations on the cards are artistic, but they capture the essence of cat behavior extremely well. We have cats in many various poses -- hiding, playing, and resting -- and many in which they're just being themselves. One of the reasons I like the images so much is that they speak for themselves; there are very few "symbols" on the card in addition to the animals, and that makes for a clarity that I rarely see in a tarot deck. You'll see a few nods to standard RWS imagery here and there -- the Empress is present with her kittens, and the Wheel of Fortune has a wagon wheel -- but overall the cards are uncomplicated.

Cats are not the only animals on the cards, though. While felines rule the majors, each one of the suits was selected with a particular animal and cat color to enhance the meanings. Pentacles cards have brown tabbies, for example, and feature mice as the preferred prey item. Swords, on the other hand, reinforce the air element and are represented by the talkative Siamese cats, and show birds as well as the cats. Suits have the standard associated for RWS decks.

Givin explains that she includes the keywords from Joan Bunning's Learning the Tarot. A short explanation of the image and some examples of what each card might mean in a reading are a part of the LWB as well. There is also one tarot spread listed, the Nine Lives Spread, based on the old cat proverb, "A cat has nine lives, 3 he plays, 3 he strays, and 3 he stays."

I also like that these cats are for the most part adult cats, and not kittens. OK, OK ... I'll be the first to admit that I love cute kittens, but the fact that these are adult cats gives the deck a maturity that it wouldn't have had with playful kittens on every card. I'm sure I wouldn't have been as fond of the deck, either.

My obvious bias toward cats aside, this is a great to give to a tarot beginner. I'm really fond of the images and their simple yet powerful tone, and combining it with Joan Bunning's meanings and only one spread was a stroke of genius. This would also make a great gift for the ailurophiles in your life -- even non-tarot people would enjoy these beautiful images of cats.

-- Rev. John Marani, ATA Quarterly


There are several cat themed decks out there but this one is truly special, not only does it follow the Rider-Waite style, each card tells a story from a very unique perspective ... A cats! What better way to see the world than through the eyes of a beloved cat. Debra, a practicing vet for 22 years, exclusively in feline practice, she has absolutely captured the essence of cats in this deck and with each card there is no doubt as to what is going through these glorious kitties' minds.

This deck is simply perfect in size and works great for those with smaller hands as it's not too wide to shuffle and handle properly and it has an amazing glossy lamination. I'm big on the art of the card backs and have been known to choose decks in part by the wonderful imagery on the backs and this deck does not disappoint. It features a brown long-haired tabby with mesmerizing green eyes that nearly fills the whole card save one thin border of white.

The Major Arcana are graced with cats of white, calico, ginger and tabby, black and siamese all lovingly painted in scenes of blue and plum tones that make these little kitties pop right out of the cards. I always look for a select few cards when considering a deck and the Star is among one of them. I love the way that Debra has portrayed a little calico gently reaching out to the reflection of a star in chilly stream and it brings to mind the phrase "reach for the stars" what a great way to get the meaning of hope across.

The Minor Arcana are just as charming with the suit of Wands picturing fiery ginger cats, the suit of Cups showing wonderful jellicle kitties, the suit of Swords featuring the talkative siamese and the suit of Pentacles with it's tabby striped beauties. Also featured alongside these fabulous felines in the Minor Arcana are fish, reptiles, birds and mice.

I had the best time while working with this deck, I found that it reads very well and I had no problems getting clear and concise messages, just like ones I receive from any cat when he/she is letting me know how it is! I may not recommend it as a beginner's deck, however, I think that a basic knowledge of the Rider-Waite symbolism would be helpful but this is truly a deck for anyone who loves and shares their life with cats.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic

$21.95
Celestial Tarot Deck
Celestial Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE CELESTIAL TAROT DECK:

Artist/astrologer Kay Steventon and author/lecturer Brian Clark together have created a stunning blend of the myths and symbols of astronomy with the tool of astrological divination. The mysteries that are the Tarot emerge in a very different manner, one that is unique and empowering. It is a guide to the heavens, as well as a guide to our inner selves.

While this deck follows the traditional structure of the Tarot (the Major Arcana retain their traditional titles, with Strength as VIII and Judgment as XI; the suits are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles; the Court Cards are King, Queen, Prince, and Princess), it is overtly based on the traditions of astronomy, astrology, and mythology.

The twenty-two cards of the Major Arcana are represented by the twelve zodiacal constellations and the ten planets of contemporary astrology. In the Minor Arcana, we encounter what the author terms "extra-zodiacal" constellations. The Minor Arcana us divided into decants, with the thought of adding insight and symbolism to each card. In the Court Cards, the Princesses each embody a season, while the Prince, Queen and King each embody the fixed, mutable, and cardinal signs of each element. The artwork is stunning, and strongly carries the character of fantasy. Toss in astrological and elemental symbology, along with Hebrew letters, and this deck rocks! I loved going through the cards and looking for the symbols and the intricate details. The overall tone is a little dark, as far as coloring goes, with deep blue/lavender backgrounds, with imagery in gold, white, lighter lavender, blues and greens, with some bronze/red. It is very hard for me to pick favorite cards with this deck, as I like so many of them! The Fool certainly stands out: associated with the planet Uranus, the Fool is seen as acting suddenly and unexpectedly. He is shown as a small, naked figure against the night sky, arms up and in an apparent freefall. The lower half of the card appears to be a choppy sea, with the shoulders, head, and upraised arm of a male figure shown in the upper half, against a light lavender background. Celestial Tarot is a deck for those who want to work with astrological associations, or those who are interested in myth. This deck certainly could be used for readings, but it would also work well for meditation and journeying.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


This is a complicated, though breathtaking, deck design. It will probably suit the more astrologically minded among us, and those with a good working understanding of Greek mythology. Each Major Arcana card is given either a planetary or zodiacal attribution. Each suit is assigned to its traditional Element, and each pip also has a mythological figure or a constellation associated with it. The images are generally dictated by sections of the myth in question -- for example, the 9 of Swords is associated with Canis Minor, and the image shows us a dog glancing back over his shoulder. Superimposed upon him is the shape of the constellation named for him, and the astrological symbol of Gemini to indicate separation.

The artist who created this deck is Kay Steventon, who brought us the fantastic Spiral Tarot, working in collaboration with Brian Clark. They have gone on to produce an oracular deck called Ancient Feminine Wisdom. The images in this deck are evocative and almost ethereal. The complexity of symbol incorporated into each card is astonishing, with occult glyphs from the Hebrew alphabet, the Qabalah and other sources all adding insight into the mind of the artist.

The little booklet that accompanies the deck explains extensively about each of the legends, which were incorporated into the design of the cards. Though some of the given interpretations are somewhat unusual I found them complementary to my existing knowledge -- expanding my view of specific cards. For example, the 4 of Pentacles is described thus "With the 4 of Pentacles, Taurus initiates the individual into the awareness of the boundary separating Earth’s sacred and secular spheres by recognizing the distinction between inner values and outer possessions. When this card appears the individual needs to reflect on his or her relationship with the material realm". Whilst not exactly a classic interpretation, it is one which builds a new dimension of understanding.

This is most definitely not a beginner's deck. But for a more experienced user of Tarot I would suggest that, both as a meditation tool and a working deck, it could definitely have a lot to offer. The accompanying booklet is very well written and extensive. If you liked the Spiral Tarot, you'll love this one, especially if you have an interest in astrology and Greek myth.

-- Jan Shepherd, Angel Paths

$21.95
Connolly Tarot
Connolly Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CONNOLLY TAROT:

Aside from the positive viewpoint of the cards the colors are beautiful and are great for meditation. In fact, there is an extra card showing a doorway called the doorway to meditation. For anyone with a lively colorful and positive outlook then I think these cards will speak to you. They are not too far different from the standard packs, that a beginner wouldn't be able to decipher them yet they are easier to interpret generally as the images are easier to relate to. I've only had the pack 2 days and I am in love with it and feel that this will remain one of my favorites.

-- Heather Wagstaff, on Aeclectic Tarot


Connolly has made major changes to the symbolism of this deck, though she did seem to try to convey the Waite-Smith or "Traditional" meanings in her deck. If you can read with the Waite-Smith deck, you should have little difficulty reading with this one. The suit of Swords has been toned down. There is no bloodshed or violence to women depicted anywhere in this deck. The art is very good. The colors are bright and vibrant and there is lots of detail.

-- Michele Jackson, on Tarot Passages


The Connolly Tarot, created by mom Eileen Connolly and illustrated by son Peter Paul Connolly is a wonderful visually pleasing deck, reminiscent of medieval stained glass often associated with majestic cathedrals found all over Europe.

Peter Connolly has created stunning imagery using colored pencils and rich colors, making this a truly stunning deck. The images follow the Rider Waite symbolism and are easy to follow, making it a great deck for beginners and intermediate readers and has a great positive feel to it. The cards are laminated lightly and the design on the backs makes it able to be read upright or reversed.

The Minor Arcana are just as beautiful and detailed as the Majors and each have Roman numerals at the top of each card. There are a lot of chubby little cherubs in this deck, which adds a sense of charm and spirituality that runs through both Major and Minor Arcana. I just love the colors, they are striking and the symbolism is gentle and easy to interpret. This would be a great deck for any collection.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic

$21.95
Crystal Visions Tarot
Crystal Visions Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CRYSTAL VISIONS TAROT:

When you open up the Crystal Visions Tarot by fantasy artist Jennifer Galasso, you are entering a different world -- a colorful one filled with crystals, fairies, animals and mystical figures. The artist was inspired by Stevie Nicks' latest CD "Crystal Visions" as well as her interest in crystal balls.

I was enchanted with the vibrant images right away. The artist's color choices are bold and bright yet still ethereal. Purples, scarlet reds, deep indigos and lush greens make this deck a visual feast for the eyes. While the art is fantasy based, it manages to steer away from being too cheesy. Although some of the figures were a bit cartoonish, overall the look is whimsical, romantic and mythical. Based on the standard Rider Waite Smith system, this deck stays almost true to the tradition -- there is an additional card in the deck, giving you 79 cards rather than 78. This extra card is called "The Unknown Card" and when it lands in a reading, it represents something that is "not yet meant to be revealed". The usual Majors are featured and the suits are traditional Cups, Wands, Swords and Pentacles. Court cards are Kings, Queens, Knights and Pages.

Different flowers and animals represent each suit:
Cups: emotions -- water lilies and dragon flies
Swords: intellect and conflict -- ravens and winged creatures
Pentacles: material things and money -- crystals, fruitful trees, wildlife
Wands: creativity -- candles, sprites, dragons

While I enjoyed the art in the Minors, the Majors are the standout part of this deck. My favorites were the Hierophant with the pope sitting on a throne in front of a stained glass window adorned with different religious symbols; the eerie Death card with a ghostly figure standing above a seemingly dead female on a headstone; the mighty Emperor with his ram's mask and The Devil with a playful Pan like figure in the background trying to entice a naked woman who lounging by a tree with an apple in her hand (who is tempting who?) I would recommend this deck to any tarot collector, any fans of fantasy art, younger readers or beginners, as well as anyone who enjoys crystals and faeries. There are no really creepy images, making this deck appropriate for everyone. Two Swords Up!

-- Theresa Reed, The Tarot Lady


If you like fantasy art, (and who doesn't?) this deck is a must have for all Tarot deck collectors and readers. It's beautifully illustrated, full of symbology, and evocative. Based on the traditional structure of the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) system of a 78 card deck, you will find the familiar names of the Major Arcana, the Court, and the suits: Wands, Cups, Pentacles, Swords. Included is an added bonus, The Unknown Card. The images are clear in their detail and of sufficient size to see them clearly, and surrounded by a narrow white border. The backs are reversible with a large opalescent sphere in the center which is surrounded by a filigree of rose vines and gems. A pentacle rests in each corner, while a chalice sits in the center at top and bottom.

This beautiful deck would be appropriate for beginners to more advanced readers. I believe I will be spending many delighted hours now and in the future, working with this deck. I’m sure clients will find it as pleasing, if not more so, as I do. If you happen to be on the fence about purchasing this deck, I would recommend it for either yourself or as a gift. It's a win-win!

-- Koneta Bailey, New Paths Tarot


Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to the classic Rider-Waite 78-card system in much of its symbolism, as well as in card and suit names. The luscious card imagery also illustrates the elemental aspects of each suit in order to aid the novice in forming associations with the cards. The Crystal Visions Tarot deck includes 78 cards with an additional unknown card for gazing into future situations that have not yet been revealed, or for exploring issues with deeper insight. The instruction booklet offers both upright and reversed meanings.

The LWB provides an Introduction to the deck along with descriptions and divinatory meanings for each card, including meanings for reversed cards. I am impressed with the amount and value of the material in this LWB. We are given the usual DMs but we are also given insight into the reasoning behind the depiction of the characters on the cards. For example, the description of The World includes: "The characters depicted in this card sits on top of the world in the lotus pose. She appears to be meditating, listening to the hum of the universe. She wears a necklace with the Hindu symbol 'Om' symbolizing the most perfect integration of mind, body and spirit."

The colors on these cards are soft yet vivid. The images have a distinctly fantasy feel. The characters primarily consist of broad-shouldered, well-proportioned men and beautiful, slender women with long, flowing hair. These ethereal images are pleasing to the eye in both color and style. Each suit has its own consistent color scheme, inspired by the element associated with that suit. The Cups cards feature violet and magenta backgrounds; the card titles are black on a pinky lavender bar. Swords cards are indigo and lavender, with the titles written on a lavender-blue bar. Pentacles cards are shades of green and brown, with the titles written on a pale olive-green bar. Wands cards are orange-red and maroon, with the titles written on what I would call a rosy beige bar. The artist's "cool" and "warm" palettes make it easy to recognize the elemental associations in any given spread.

The symbolism on the cards also ties in nicely with elemental associations. For example, the moon appears in in various phases on all of the Cups (Water) cards. Lions and dragons appear on many of the Wands (Fire) cards. Birds or butterflies appear on most of the Swords (Air) cards. Trees and plants dominate the scenes on the Pentacles (Earth) cards.

This deck is likely to appeal to readers who prefer traditional RWS titles and symbolism, but also like to work with cards that feature romantic, fantasy-style art suggestive of the Faerie realm. The level of detail in the images encourages closer study of the cards, yet is not overwhelming. Although the characters are not people you are likely to see in your everyday life, many of them are approachable and engaging. The Unknown Card may not appeal to everyone, but you don't have to use it if you don't like it. I recommend meditating on The Unknown Card before shuffling and drawing cards from this deck for the reading.

-- Zanna Starr, Tarot Notes


When I saw images of the Crystal Visions Tarot deck online, I thought it was very pretty, but I just didn't realize how beautiful these cards actually were until I bought them and held them in my hands. For many decks, sample images don't truly do a deck justice, and this one is no exception. Having these cards in my hands to shuffle and read with on an up-close-and-personal basis allowed me to quickly connect -- and to classify this deck among my favorites!

I love the feminine feel of this deck. The imagery is beautiful with rich tones that speak to me on an emotional level. And for those who prefer the RWS (Rider-Waite-Smith) style of Tarot, the symbolism of the Crystal Visions Tarot remains true to tradition -- from the titles and ordering of the Major Arcana Cards (with Strength as #8 and Justice as #11) ... to the suit names: Cups, Swords, Pentacles, and Wands ... to the traditional court card names: Page, Knight, Queen, and King. while the deck is beautiful to look at, it also renders such beautiful and meaningful energy in reading the cards. As mentioned, this deck really speaks to me on an emotional level. In fact, I quickly made friends with the Crystal Visions Tarot. Doing my first reading with this deck of cards was like connecting with a dear and trusted friend -- even though the cards and I just met during the first week of January 2012. What a lovely way to start my new year in the world of Tarot!

If you are familiar with a RWS deck, you can read the Crystal Visions Tarot straight out of the box with the understanding that there is that extra card in this deck. But for those who are new to the Tarot, I like the way the author and artist has written the 63-page accompanying booklet. It's far better than most LWB's available for a deck. I feel that even a beginner to Tarot could successfully learn Tarot with this deck and the proper books for learning this subject.

A fascinating thing I noticed in this deck is that for the cards that can signify change or rebirth on some level, there are butterflies as part of the symbolism for those cards. In the description of the High Priestess card above, the author tells us that butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and eternal life. I definitely agree, and I would add to that description that butterflies are a symbol of change. Butterflies can show us a "lighter" side of a situation, or can show how thought transforms or changes one's understanding of life and circumstances.

This is a deck that I plan to use frequently since it feels as comfortable to me as the RWS traditional tarot deck, and thus I appreciate the fact that a quality cardstock has been used for this deck. The quality cardstock will allow the Crystal Visions Tarot to stand the test of time with heavy usage.

While I noted that this deck has a feminine feel to me, there are still plenty of male characters contained within the cards. A third of the deck does feature men in the imagery. So it's not a gender biased deck. It just has a soft, gentle, nurturing, and feminine feeling for me. Of course, I don't want to leave you with the impression that this deck is filled with fluff and can't tell it like it is. It definitely can tell the tale of a difficult and challenging story in your life, but at the same time, it's like having a friend by your side who will offer comfort, support, and guidance to get through whatever you're going through. This is the kind of gentle strength that offers empowerment.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone who enjoys the RWS tarot decks, to those who want a gentle deck that has a softer approach (yet still powerful!), and even for those who are just starting with the Tarot. The Crystal Visions Tarot follows RWS tradition in a way that doesn't clone or copy the familiar and well-loved kind of traditional tarot deck, but is still similar enough to immediately resonate with. Collectors will also want to get a copy of this deck, too.

-- Velvet Angel, Tarot Wisdom Readings


To call a tarot deck "different" is definitely vague. The Crystal Visions Tarot is different from many tarot decks I have come across. The cards reflect Galasso’s fantasy style, so those who enjoy fantasy-themed decks will surely like this one. Most of the characters on the cards are women, which is a change from many more traditional tarot decks. Similar to the back, the cards are colored in mostly soft pinks and purples. Each card has a colored rectangle at the bottom with the name of the card, and the background color changes depending on the suit of the card, which is great for the reader. The card backs are simple yet complex, with pentacles in each corner and a circle in the center adorned with flowers. A chalice adorns the center of the long ends of the card. The entire back color is muted and soft, pleasing to the eye and drawing you in. The cards are shiny but not slippery. From an imagery perspective, the deck has some similarities to standard RWS symbols, but it is far from a clone. The Fool in this deck walks off a cliff, but instead of a dog she is accompanied by a number of butterflies.

Galasso's attention to detail is impressive -- the Ace of Cups is one of the most beautiful cards I have ever seen in a tarot deck. One interesting fact is the many of the cards have some kind of reference to air -- a dragonfly, fairy, butterfly, or other winged creature -- which is something you don't often see in tarot decks. I especially liked the Death card, which has Death holding a staff topped with an ankh and the inscription VITA MUTATUR NON TOLLITUR (Life is changed, not taken away) on a tomb. Butterflies reinforce the overall transformation feel of the card. It softened the card but rendered it neither foolish nor powerless, which is a fine line to walk.

This deck also features an additional card, bringing the total number of cards to 79. "The Unknown Card" is explained as an area of the reading which requires further examination -- like a past event, for example -- or that additional steps need to be taken to clarify the bigger picture. I'm not a big fan of extra cards in tarot decks, especially with vague descriptions, so likely I'd use the deck without this one.

While I'm not a fan of reading with fantasy decks generally speaking, I intend to give this one a try. I think my clients will like it, and I know I'll enjoy reading with it, especially when I need a change from RWS clone decks and I'd like something soft yet powerful.

-- John Marani, in ATA Quarterly Journal


The first thing to note about this deck is the beautiful use of color in each card. A major strength of this deck is its ability to create a mood or feeling with each card by such masterful use of color. In the author's own words, the cards have a "vibrant and consistent color scheme, in order to be easily recognizable within a spread."

The artist has consistently portrayed each suit experience through specific colors, crystals, people and other beings. She also assigns elements to each of the four suits in the LWB. The world and its artwork are largely influenced by her work as a fantasy artist and illustrator.

Coins -- the scenes take place in and around tress, lots of greens and yellows, crystals and earth spirits.

Cups -- all scenes take place in same locale and include water lilies, dragonflies, the moon in its different phases, pinks and reddish purples.

Wands -- features lions, unicorns, horses, mountainous terrain and lots of red.

Swords -- the scenes are bleak, cold and snowy with nurds and other winged characters.

One particularly striking card for me is the 4 of Swords. A woman lies at rest on her back in snow that almost covers her, and her arms are crossed as if keeping her only slightly warm. Swords, roses and petals are strewn on the snow around her, and the whole scene is viewed from directly above her. While her face is expressionless, the image itself is felt at first glance. In readings I have found that the characters' faces and eyes do not communicate nearly so much as do the gestalt of colors, symbols and flow of details in each card image. Messages with this deck seem to be toned down in an almost introverted style for a nice and gentle read, much like getting advice from a dreamy friend who, even in anger or elation, remains subdued and calm.

-- John Alan, on Tarot Guild


I love the colors and sense of grace in this deck. The intention with this deck was to create art that was unique, but that would be close enough to traditional imagery to allow new readers to learn the Tarot easily. This is a traditional 78 card deck with one additional card in the Major Arcana, entitled the Unknown Card. It represents an answer that is not yet ready to be revealed. I love decks with an extra card like this”! The Unknown Card can refer to something from the past, or something that is going to happen in the future. The area that this card falls in indicates where steps need to be taken to clarify the big picture. There is also a hint to move forward with an open mind, leaving all bias behind. I loved this card before I even knew what it represented -- my thought was "Yes! Another deck with a card that is 'gifted'!" What an incredible card, with the female figure holding a crystal ball in her left hand. In front of her we see the shadow of an owl. Her whole body posture invites the Seeker to peer into the crystal ball! The artwork is done in a fantasy style, using reds, greens, lavender, and dark brown predominately. There is a sense of gentleness and "otherworldliness" that draws one in, and makes one feel right at home.

This is one deck that if I had my way, I would talk about each and every card! However, that is not allowed, so we will look at the cards that pulled me in the strongest. One of my birth cards is the Hermit, so that is one card that I look at in every deck. If there was a make or break card for me, this would be it. Here we see a lone figure, in a lavender robe, sitting atop a mountain, with a lamp in their left hand. They face the right hand side of the card, generally considered to represent the future. To me, they appear very wistful. The Empress stands in the middle of a garden, wearing a bright red dress, and carrying a triskele scepter in her right hand. She holds a heart-shaped charm. Lush greenery is behind her, as well as a tree with bright green foliage and ripe red fruit. In the upper right hand corner of the card we see beautiful butterflies.

The Lovers shows a man and a woman embracing, with flowers in the right and left hand lower corners. The figures are bound by ties held by two doves.

The Ten of Swords in this deck is one of the least scary, but saddest, images of this card that I have seen in any deck. A female figure is face down in the snow, bloody, with ten swords in her back. She is surrounded by snow and barren trees. The clouds in the sky behind her are attempting to part, indicating that there is hope.

The Eight of Pentacles shows a female figure, standing at her spinning wheel, paying ardent attention to her work. I like this card because she is working outside, with greenery surrounding her and a tree behind her.

The Fool in this deck just carries incredible energy! The figure is a female, with dark, flowing hair. She stands on a precipice, one foot on land and one in the air. There is a trail of butterflies in the air to her right.

I found this deck very easy to read with, and feel that it would be a great deck to offer clients as a choice for their readings. The art alone is gorgeous, and the additional card (the Unknown Card) opens up new avenues for reading. It could simply be taken out of the deck if the reader preferred not to use it.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, on Aeclectic Tarot


I felt compelled to look through the cards a second time, and a third. Each time I did, I saw something I hadn't noticed before. There are figures of people in the twisted tree branches, and delicate angels in the clouds. The lush flowers and trees have lovely texture, as do the brilliantly colored dragons. The skies and landscapes are evocative. When I looked closely at each card, I realized this isn't a trite deck. I felt like an old woman who has mistakenly assumed a young, pretty girl to be shallow and stupid. Crystal Visions Tarot is true to Rider Waite Smith structure and interpretation. In many cards, the subtle symbolism honors a wealth of tarot tradition, often in clever ways.

It would take a long time to describe all the cards I love in this deck. They include the Fool, who is female. Butterflies, appropriate for the air correspondence of this card, also surround her. Her dress has red ribbons, one of which has casually wrapped around her leg, giving her the ancient tradition of the Fool's red-striped legs. In the World card we see a large lotus flower cradling a globe on which sits a woman in lotus position. More butterflies here, not elementally appropriate, but acceptable, because they are flying out of her palm chakras. As I mentioned earlier, I question the addition of a seventy-ninth card, entitled The Unknown Card. This card says that the answer is, at present, unknowable. Perhaps we need to look within and find the answer in our own heart. The card is actually quite lovely. It shows a modern Goth-looking young Pagan woman holding a crystal ball. The image is rather different from the rest of the deck. It stands out as a special card, belonging to none of the suits. It is a legitimate tradition in random token divination to use a blank token. It makes sense for Galasso to offer us this option.

That I have already started using Crystal Visions Tarot for professional readings is the highest praise I could give any tarot deck. However, I was initially unsure if I wanted to use the Unknown Card, or use my prerogative to remove it. So far, I have left it in the deck. I must admit, it pops up at very appropriate times.

It has been a while since I've discovered a new deck to add to my short list of professional reading decks. Crystal Visions Tarot is attractive, evocative and easy to understand. Unlike many fantasy art tarot decks, its images are uncomplicated and traditional. Do not be fooled by its youthful energy, Crystal Visions Tarot will give great wisdom and depth. It will be a solid learning and reading deck for anyone from beginners to seasoned professionals.

-- Christiana Gaudet, on Aeclectic Tarot


Fantasy artist Galasso has transformed classic tarot imagery into a vibrant tour, through a crystal ball, into a magical world filled with fairies, fantastical creatures, and exotic flowers. Color creates the backdrop against which the story of each card is told. Lyrical and mysterious, the illustrations almost sing.

-- Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight Magazine

$21.95
Deviant Moon Tarot Deck
Deviant Moon Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DEVIANT MOON TAROT:

I've seen hundreds of Tarot decks over the years, and I can honestly say there is nothing on the market that rivals the sumptuous textures, masterful artistry and utter originality of the Deviant Moon Tarot.

For months now, several images of the Deviant Moon Tarot were posted to the web, capturing the imagination of Tarot enthusiasts worldwide. Many were clamoring for news, more card images and a definitive release date with an almost desperate excitement.

Tarot fans, rejoice! U.S. Games has now unleashed the highly anticipated Deviant Moon Tarot upon the world! And let me tell you, if the exquisite, highly-detailed online images whetted your appetite, the actual deck goes above and beyond expectation.

The Deviant Moon Tarot expands on Rider-Waite imagery with a gloriously twisted perspective, reflecting common associations in dazzling patterns, striking colors, and surprising juxtapositions (e.g. a tree that bleeds red, a Page that has created himself out of spare parts and a sharp-dressed masked armless woman with a wheel for a left “foot"). The 9 of Cups, usually deemed the "Wish Card", aptly depicts a genie who's just emerged from a child's magic lamp.

I’m pleased to report that not only is the Deviant Moon Tarot a solid reading deck, but also unexpectedly insightful.

So despite the unusual characters populating the world of the Deviant Moon, they still speak messages relevant and purposeful to discerning individuals. This would make a great journaling deck, too, as well as one for comparative Tarot studies.

-- Janet Boyer, Tarot Channel


Artistically, the cards are incredibly strong and equally consistent from the Fool all the way through to the King of Pentacles. They are dark on the surface and underneath; photographs from cemeteries and tombstones have been morphed and twisted into other elements of the cards: clothing trim, headgear and shoes. The backgrounds are urban and industrial, scenes are often set outdoors but there is little natural environment; the moon rises over smokestacks, dull and dirty skies, fortified buildings -- all created from photographs of a mental asylum. The figures in the cards are non-human, with layered faces and moon-like masks, wide staring eyes, bird-like feet and often elongated bodies. Despite the lack of regular human facial expressions and body language, the figures are remarkably expressive. It’s a deck of the subconscious, of bad dreams, of visions from a bad trip come to life. Patrick’s symbolism comes from childhood dreams and imagination, a visual dedication to his interest in the ‘more melancholy side of life’. It’s reminiscent of its Rider-Waite heritage but really has a feeling all of its own. It’s a nice change to see imagery with such polish and dedication that also has an obvious familiarity with the tarot’s symbolism; it stays true to tarot but brings to it a new and disturbing approach.

The cards depart from traditional elements of symbolism in many ways but the card’s tarot meaning is still clear. As in the Nine of Cups, the well-dressed character releases a genie from the bottle and looks on with surprise; a very appropriate image for what is traditionally known as the ‘Wish’ card. The King of Wand isn’t seated on a throne, and instead holds woodland creatures by the hand and strides through the scene, but still comes across as the confident, charismatic leader.

The Moon card is literally the puppet-master of the figures below, holding the strings that connect them and controlling their movements. Ugly but strangely elegant, Death has a red scarf wrapped around her skeletal horse head and a pregnant belly, signaling both the end and the beginning inherent in transformation of Death. The cards do have an uncomfortable edge, even in traditionally positive and usually pretty cards like the Star.

The companion booklet is entirely in English and for each card shares a description of the imagery and a few keywords for the upright and reversed aspect of each card. Reading the booklet really not necessary to use the cards -- all of the depth is in the imagery itself, there is little further background or explanation needed. There’s an original ten-card spread as well, based on cards arranged simply in a circle.

A little tarot knowledge is always useful, but it’s not mandatory to use the Deviant Moon. The dark and strange beauty of its imagery takes a new approach but is true enough to the tarot archetypes to be useable by readers from novice level to the well experienced -- as long as you’re prepared for a little excursion into the dark side of your subconscious.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


I received The Deviant Moon Tarot on a Monday and spent four days doing nothing but pursuing the cards.

The images themselves are absorbing surrealistic humanoid figures in abstract settings, that are at once attractive and haunting. Many of the faces are 'split' between a light and dark half, some faces appear to be masked, and on others the masks are faces, some appendages have multiplied beyond the two that we’d see in a humanoid ... we expect to see some things, and we see what we expect ... and then are left unsettled as the images unfold.

Patrick Valenza accomplished something quite unexpected, facilitated because he used a surrealistic approach to the Tarot. He has his static humanoids performing the dynamic actions that pertain to the card’s meaning. For most cards, it is a simple matter of 'what is this character obviously doing now' (or just completed, or about to do). Because of the organic and narrative approach to the subjects, we are also able to understand how each of the characters feels.

The Tower is a tower, and the Devil is a devil (great feet), Temperance pours from one container to another, there are stars on The Star.

However the images keep unfolding.

There were little details that popped out during the readings, and I had to go to the source for some answers.

"Uh Patrick, I notice there are a few oddly placed clocks with unexpected times displayed, for example in the Eight of Pentacles the clock displays eleven fifty-eight."
"Thanks for noticing" answered Patrick, with a wry smile, "Yup, two minutes to midnight ... all the work you do in a day, and there is always more to do the next. Day in and day out. Hoping for something to show after all of this work ... maybe you won't see it today, but maybe tomorrow."
"How about the Four of Pentacles, the clock there displays nine forty."
Patrick pauses and leans back. "There’s a background story here. My father-in-law was a greedy, materialistic man. Everything in his life was based on what he owned, and always put himself over his children. Well, the day came when he finally died. We heard the news at about 9:40 one morning. Nobody was particularly heart broken. I always wondered what he thought, lying there waiting to be cremated ... does he say to himself, 'I wish I spent more time with my children as they grew up', or was it, 'DAMN, I didn't make enough money!' So in this card, the death angel leads the miser to the fires of the furnace, with the symbol of time dangling from her mouth. The miser looks back on his possessions in fear that he will never see them again, while clutching a few golden pentacles in a last attempt to "take it with him".
I ask "How about the Hanged Man. His clock says five eleven."
"I used to work at the most mundane job years ago ... a real nine to five. Many times, I would work a bit past the whistle. I found it a total waste of time, but back then I had little choice. I felt I was in limbo, and had to make a real effort to break free of my suspended life. This clock represents my lost time there and the times I worked past 5:00."
One last question Patrick, tell me about the borders ... "
"The mixed colors come from the cards I created when I was 15. Truthfully, the colors on the majors just looked good with the color compositions of the individual cards at the time, so I just carried that over when I re-began the deck in 2004. However, the minors were different ... these colors relate to the citizens of each realm. The borders on the suit of Swords are Red for their strife and pain of the heart. Cups have Blue for the calm purity of the sea. In Wands I used Green for the earth and the natural world. And with Pentacles, Black for the materialistic void they have in their souls."

So now that we have more information, we’ve also left the antiquated suit meanings in the past where they belong, in the latter half of the Victorian era. Even Majors refuse to pay homage to this era by using the Continental numbering system.

This is a great deck for the reader who does not want to read a book and be told what meaning is.

But I have to provide a strong caveat ... if you are a reader who prefers sunny bunny over truth -- don’t visit this deck. The Deviant Moon strikes to the heart of issues, with the same ease that it pushes aside six hundred years of Tarot myth-takes; it dives directly towards the truth. That will unsettle many.

It’s often difficult to remember, that the voices that whisper in the darkness from the peeling walls, often speak the truth.

-- Dan Pelletier, The Tarot Garden


The Deviant Moon Tarot is a Moon theme RWS based deck. The art appears very abstract, medieval and is inspired by ancient Greek art. It is a bit on the darker side, but I would not call this a dark deck. It actually appears to be a very workable deck. It will appeal to many, both Readers and Sitters This deck will be especially attractive to those who are fond of the non-traditional or maybe even looking for something a little creepy.

The Little White Book included with this deck, gives meanings for the Majors and the Minors, in both upright and reversed positions. The spread in the back of the LWB is the Lunatic Spread, which is a ten card spread. It’s nice to see someone take some creativity with their LWB!

Patrick Valenza created the Deviant Moon Tarot, basing it on childhood images and visions seen through his imagination and brought with him, into adulthood. His art ranges from detailed colored pencil and acrylic drawings to photographic manipulation that is used in combination with digital drawings, which was used to create this deck. Each card began with a drawing that was scanned into a computer, then they were manipulated. The background buildings were created with photographs that he took of a local abandoned insane asylum.

I particularly like what is going on in the background of each card. There are many unique old-style buildings, which look like old factories, churches and abandoned buildings. There is a lot going on in each card. All of which can apply easily to your readings.

-- Terri Clement, American Tarot Association


For me the first impression of the artwork was startling. But as I began to flip through the cards the little characters began to grow on me. They are sort of gothic and whimsical at the same time and as I looked even closer I saw some interesting symbolism coming through as well. I loved how the characters on the cards had lunar faces- the bright half of the face, which I took as being the conscious self, has an open eye while the dark half, the possible subconscious of the face, has the eye closed. All the cards have titles except Death and the numbered cards. I found this interesting and mysterious it made me want to find out why.

Then my almost 16 year old daughter came in the door and she fell in love with the images; they were just her style. She loves the whole Corpse Bride/Goth scene and this deck was made for her. She is also a budding photographer and loved the idea that the pictures in this deck are made from manipulated photographs.

Then as I continued to flip through the cards I laughed out loud at the 10 of Swords. It’s the typical 10 of Swords image but the little creature is biting on his own hand while a little demon is biting on his shoulder. Somehow this scene just cracked me up. The cat made me laugh too just because it didn’t look very healthy (not that an unhealthy cat is humorous but you have to see this card to get my meaning.) I was starting to really like this little deck with its endearing dark little characters. Then I saw Patrick’s 6 of Cups and knew the Deviant Moon Tarot creator and I had found common ground. There was a puppet show the same idea I had for my MAAT Tarot 6 of Cups.

In my opinion I think other people will come to find Deviant Moon to be a sweet little deck. Congratulations Patrick. I’m looking forward to shaking your hand at some Tarot event soon.

-- Julia Cuccia-Watts, New Moon Trading blogspot


When I was asked by US Games if I would be interested in receiving an advance review copy of Patrick Valenza's new Deviant Moon Tarot, I was very excited. I had seen a few scans of this deck in progress months earlier, and was quite interested in seeing the finished product. When I opened the deck, I was blown away. I had expected that after the first few cards, they would all begin to blend in together, just more of what I'd already seen. Card after card, I was surprised and delighted at every spectacular new image. I have never been more fascinated and impressed with a deck.

The magic of this deck is in its ability to captivate and lure you into this fascinating world. Many times when I'm looking at a deck that strays from traditional RWS imagery, I tend to see flashes in my mind of the RWS equivalent meanings as a comparison. While the Deviant Moon doesn't follow traditional imagery, as soon as I look at one of the cards, I automatically know what card it is, and I've found that before my mind is able to flash to the RWS "meaning" in my head, the artwork forces me to bypass that step, as it pulls me in further and asks more of me. I am drawn to delve deeper into the card, experiencing additional layers of meaning.

There is some talk among the tarot community of this deck being really dark. However, I don't see it that way at all, and when communicating with the artist, he confirmed that it wasn't ever intended to be a dark deck. He explained that it was based on his childhood imagination, a twisted world which is at times a bit melancholy, yet includes elements of humor as well. After working with the deck for a week, I can definitely attest to the fact that the images inspire imagination. The characters, for the most part, aren't maniacal or creepy. They are unique and engaging, and not without emotion. I find the artwork captivating and intriguing, though I do not consider it a dark deck.

The Cards

Valenza's use of color is striking and leads your eyes on a parade around each card, so that you notice the smallest details, down to the color of toenail polish on the characters' feet.

The Aces in this deck really stand out, as they are extremely elaborate. Rather than featuring the usual solitary symbol of a cup, wand, sword or pentacle, the Deviant Moon Aces are fully illustrated with characters.

The originality of Valenza's mastering and blending his artwork with tarot is stunning. I am completely enchanted by the Wands suit of this deck. Ordinarily, it's visually my least favorite suit. This deck has made me love Wands, and that's no small feat! In fact, this deck features so many cards that immediately stood out as my favorite version from any deck, due to their original portrayal.

How it Reads

In addition to my daily draws, I have done a few other readings with the Deviant Moon this week, and have found the deck to be equally as forthcoming and clear in those readings as well. Once the initial overview is clear, the images then draw me in further to elaborate and refine the reading. When laid out, the cards flow together so well and tell stories as though the artist had designed those cards you selected to specifically go together.

Final Thoughts

It should be glaringly obvious how enchanted by and enamored I am of the Deviant Moon Tarot. The originality of this deck far exceeds any other I've seen, and the power it has to draw you into the world of imagination is amazing.

-- Tarot Dame Blog


A bit Dali, a bit Picasso, and a bit Cirque du Soleil, Valenza’s fascinatingly unique creation, the Deviant Moon Tarot, has an idiosyncratic beauty that is mesmerizing and compelling. There is an almost hyper-realism in the clean lines and the crisp colors and textures in the artwork, which presents a vivid contrast with the dreamlike surrealism of the scenes in these cards and the strange figures who cavort within them. Indeed, the cards are populated with bizarre and grotesque characters that seem to have been inspired by a medieval bestiary or imagined by a child fearing what might be lurking under the bed at night.

Valenza’s use of traditional Tarot symbolism on these cards is spare, but he has compensated for this by lavishing upon them whatever his imagination could dredge up from the depths of his subconscious. In this way, he has created a deck with a very creative take on the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith imagery.

-- James Ricklef


To say The Deviant Moon Tarot deck is just another deck in Rider Waite Smith tradition would be an understatement. The deck takes you into another world of ying/yang insectoid creatures populating a bleak industrial landscape. Patrick Valenza subliminally inserted images from cemataries and an abandonded insane asylum into the images. My first impression upon my receipt of the deck that it was too dark for me to do readings with for people I ordinarily would read for; but for those whose tastes lean to the unusual I'm sure it would work fine. The symbolism of the images maintains traditional interpretations in most cases, but give it a new twist. I think this is an excellent deck for collectors as well as those whose tastes and insights gravitate towards dark imaginings. Valenza is a talented surrealist, and more than just in a deck of cards, the images belong in a museum as each are a unique work of art, making the old new again and reinterpreting it for our times.

-- Thomas Santomartino, Amazon customer


I have over 50 Tarot decks and this is the best symbology I have yet to see. I especially love the Death card with the pregnant mother and her having to exert some gentle force with her foot on the previous child to remind him that going back into the womb is not a possibility. It really gets to the nature of the Death card being permanent, can't go back, can only go forward change - change with or without our initiation. I love how most of the characters have more than one layer to their face - it invites you to ask, "How deep do you want to go?". The Lunatic Spread is great for getting to the meat of a matter and is an added bonus. The LWB is adequate but the real prize is the thought provoking scenarios on each of the cards. Well done!!!!!!

-- Deborah, East Texas, Amazon customer


I can’t say enough about how much I love this deck! The imagery is spectacular and just the feel that was needed in the tarot world. The deck is very high quality and the minor cards are wonderful. This is exactly the deck I have been waiting for!

-- coli0157, Amazon customer


The Deviant Moon is a gorgeously alive deck. I thought just the artwork was appealing to me, but the more I work with these cards the more impressed I am. You can really sit down and have a conversation with the populace of this world, and they speak clearly. If you wonder at all about getting this deck, don't hesitate. Their world is not perfect, but they are not dark by any stretch of the imagination, and it is a deck that truly only requires reading the cards, no memorization, no confusion. The coating feels like satin, and the colors are amazing. I can't say enough good things about this deck, and I thank the creator, Patrick Valenza, most heartily!

-- Amanda Hilbrecht, Amazon customer


Valenza's highly stylized drawings are evocative, provocative, and fabulously unique. Each card is painstakingly illustrated but lacks the glitzy clutter of so many over-fluffed decks out there that lose themselves in dumbed-down beauty. This deck demands that you pay attention to the meaning of the card, not just how lovely the pictures are. As the author mentions in one of his interviews, there are no "filler" cards in this deck ... and it shows.

So far, the readings I've done using these cards have been full of wry humor and straightforward truth. This deck has a crystal clear "personality" that refuses to compromise. Absolutely no fluff here, just an unabashed and incisive approach to "traditional" Tarot reading.

-- Tessa Dagger, Amazon customer

$21.95
Dragon Tarot
Dragon Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DRAGON TAROT:

When I first became interested in reading the tarot, the one thing that I had a problem with was finding a deck that suited my feelings and represented ME. Then one day I stumbled upon the Dragon deck, and I felt like my prayers had been answered! The artwork and symbolism, combined with the rich history, myth, and mystique that surrounds dragons in general, turned out to be just what the doctor ordered. The use of many rich colors was something that I felt, at that point in time, many other decks didn't seem to have (although now I know otherwise). But, my absolute favorite part about this deck are the Major Arcana. They were (and still are) like nothing I had ever seen before. The capture all the symbolism of traditional tarot decks, but they also contain a draconic twist that is sometimes a bit funny (in particular, the Hanging Dragon card!).

All in all, the Dragon Tarot was the first deck I ever owned, and it remains my favorite to this day. I highly suggest this deck to anyone who doesn't feel connected to the more traditional decks, and longs for something deeper. It is very hard to put into words all that I feel with this deck, so you may be better off experiencing its power for yourself, but believe me, you won't regret it! Again, I have seen many decks in my days, but none of them compares to the power and imagery of the Dragon Tarot!

-- Charlie Taylor, on Aeclectic Tarot


I absolutely LOVE this deck. The images are beautiful and powerful and readings are very accurate for me. A friend of mine did one reading with my cards and has decided he wants a deck of his own. It is a very strong deck, but "welcoming," almost like coming home. If you like dragons, you will most likely connect with this deck and may keep it as your personal deck.

-- Kelli Riffle, on Amazon


Gorgeous artwork! This is the kind of deck that speaks to anyone with a love for dragons and dragon lore. I fell in love with it when it first came out, and I haven't used another Tarot deck since.

-- Nathalie Wigmore, on Amazon


I just received this deck and already love it! The dragons are most elegant, intelligent, powerful but not *terrifying*! The combination of dragons and Tarot symbolism may not always be clear for Tarot beginners, but Tarot folks who have a little imagination and love dragons will delight in this deck, and they will come to understand and value its unique messages. I did not care for the Celtic Dragon deck, think it's a bit sappy. By contrast, Pracownik's work has sophistication and edge, and the dragons are just simply gorgeous.

-- Eva A. on Amazon


The Dragon Tarot follows the now traditional path of a 78 card deck.

Each card is individually illustrated with dragons and adheres loosely to the Rider Waite deck for its' imagery.

So what's it like to use the Dragon Tarot? I love it!!!! Colorful, charming, quirky but full of dragon fun and humor. Both the reader and querent will enjoy the use of this deck. The dragon appeals to all with the mystery and beauty. I feel the Dragon Tarot takes us back to a more innocent time. A time perhaps of legend, when man and dragon shared this world. You decide when you take up the challenge of the Dragon Tarot.

-- Kelvin Black, on Tarot Canada

$21.95
Dreaming Way Tarot
Dreaming Way Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT DREAMING WAY TAROT:

This RWS style deck is the work of Rome Choi and Kwon Shina. Directly from the box: "Dreaming Way Tarot dresses up traditional tarot with contemporary artistic flair. In this exquisite deck, stylish characters breathe new life into the scenes and symbols of the Major and Minor Arcana." I would agree -- this deck does demonstrate a modern flair. The artwork is strikingly modern and fun; it communicates a great deal with just the right amount of images and symbols.

Suits are traditional: Cups, Pentacles, Wands and Swords, as are the names of the Trumps. Each card has a white border with the card title at the bottom in thin black text.

The card descriptions in the LWB give both a short text about the card and what it represents as well as providing keywords for upright and reversed meanings. Additionally there are two short sections called "Characteristics of the Suits" and "Characteristics of Numbers" and a spread in the back of the LWB called "Dreaming Way Five-Card Spread," which is a spread designed to help the practitioner confront issues that may have blocked his or her contentment.

The cards themselves are not as glossy as many of the cards by U.S. Games typically are, and I find that they handle even better as a result; they tend not to slide about at the slightest touch. Cardbacks allow for reversals, as they are a Klimt-like array of circular orbs over a randomly painted green background.

I find this deck to be pleasantly neutral on most accounts. There is no angst or darkness, nor is there excess of cute or cheery images. Characters in the scenes also have well-depicted, though neutral facial expressions, with the exception of a very few cards, such as the Ten of Cups. This is important for me, because often the facial expression can be a visual distraction, or a bias, when reading a card.

Some of the fascinating card transformations in this deck include the Wheel of Fortune, Death, the Moon, Judgment, and the World.

The Wheel of Fortune is almost certain to expand your card meaning once you see it: a woman employs a spinning wheel, meanwhile a long cord full of tangles and knots twists its way through the wheel. The woman has wings, and her face is serene and expressionless.

On the Death card, all that is presented is a female, profile left, in a black gown and holding a scythe with the blade upright. All the colors on the card are dark.

In the Moon card, a girl holds a lobster by the claws with only a huge moon as the backdrop.

On the Judgment card we see only trumpeting angels -- no human figures responding to the trumpets as in the traditional RWS.

The World card bears the least resemblance to the original, and yet this might be my favorite card in the whole deck: an aged man rests peacefully in a chair, clutching a pipe, a book and reading glasses in his lap. Behind him stand a tree covered in ivy.

I would recommend this deck to readers of any level, as the images are easily understood and yet provide fertile ground for expanded meanings and intuitive reading.

-- John Alan, Tarot Guild


"Based on the traditional Rider-Waite tarot deck, the Dreaming Way Tarot builds on standard images and interpretations, adding emotional insight, whimsy, and creativity. The characters in this deck literally presented themselves to Rome Choi in a dream. He relied on his years of tarot research, numerology, and his study of Transpersonal Psychology to flesh out the deck. Kwon Shina captures Choi's original inspiration in her energetic, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, illustrations.

Together Choi and Shina have created a unique deck, which preserves the roots of traditional tarot without simply repeating what's been done in the past. Beginners will be drawn into the cards, finding lots of visual cues to jumpstart their readings. Seasoned readers will be amused, stimulated, and prodded to look deeper into familiar symbolism. This deck is a treat for the eyes, which also provides plenty to think about."

-- Anna Jedrziewski, on Tarotwise.com


"Although the deck follows the RWS symbol pattern, the combination of artistic media, color palette, and the diversity of the figures results in a deck that’s light-hearted and unique. The booklet includes traditional card meanings, but there are some surprises for readers. The booklet also provides a unique analysis of the Minor Arcana in terms of the body, mind and soul, followed by a summary of the mystical meanings of the numbers one through ten and the general roles of the four court cards.

The Page of Cups is a good example of the deck's great sense of humor. The young girl featured in the card has a teapot tied to her head. She looks a uncertain and perhaps a bit worried, as though she can’t quite figure out what to say or how to react. Three fish swim in front of her, a clever symbol of how this Page processes everything through her emotions and tends to be oversensitive to her environment. And the teapot shows how this Page can be somewhat leaky, weeping at the slightest emotional tremor. The Five of Wands is another card that’s powerful but funny. In the scene on the card, a group of young boys are sitting around a table. It looks like they're at a birthday party, and are wearing festive party hats. But something has gone horribly wrong! The boys are misbehaving. Somebody taunted or insulted somebody else, and a fight has ensued. One kid is ducking in the back, trying to avoid getting hit. The kid with the red vest looks like he intends to get his own way, no matter what!

The imagery on the cards is attractive and begs for further exploration.

The sensibility of this deck will appeal to younger readers who are fond of manga, animé and graphic novels, as well as to older readers who want a fresh take on the RWS images. The multi-cultural characters, the mix of East-West styling, the creative use of patterns (like the checkerboard in the Five of Wands), and the unfamiliar juxtaposition of color families tantalize the eye. Sweet!"

-- Elizabeth Hazel, in ATA's Quarterly Review


The Dreaming Way Tarot brings to mind illustrations from a vintage children's book. It has a dreamy, gentle quality about it. The images have a nostalgic feel to them and seem almost familiar.

I really love the style of artwork in this deck, and the contemporary, whimsical clothing fashion that adorns the characters. Oddly, there aren't very many joyous feeling cards in the bunch... everyone seems to sport a pretty serious expression.

My favorite suit in this deck is the Cups. I love the black and white cups, and how they boldly contrast with the dreamy quality of the rest of the artwork. It's so different and unique, I think it's fantastic. The vibrant checkered patterns in some of the Wands cards have a similar effect.

The Aces are gorgeous in their simplicity. The Death card is exquisite. A young woman in a black dress holds a scythe. It is simple and elegant. One of my favorite cards in the deck.

This deck has what is probably my favorite rendition of the Two of Wands. Usually this is a "meh" card for me, but this one is very interesting. The figure is looking out at two worlds, the one he is on, and another one up above, upside down. The one upside down doesn't appear to be as inhabited as this one, so it brings to mind the unlimited possibilities of those who dare to dream far and wide. Whenever I come across the Eight of Cups, it's hard for me to look away. Something about her outfit mesmerizes me. I can see the wind blowing and making her dress bubble up behind her. I love looking at this card. It makes me want to follow her, which is a great way to feel about this card. You're supposed to move on in her direction when this card comes up.

I like the motherly touches in the Queen of Cups, who has a child sitting next to her, and the Queen of Pentacles, who is holding a baby.

The Devil is very interesting, as it is portrayed by a cute young woman, shackled herself, but still in control of the chains that bind her subjects. She has horns and wings... it's a beautiful illustration. But it's certainly not a scary Devil card.

The Five of Wands is a card that hasn't come up for me yet in a reading, but when I see it in the deck, I hurry past it. The main boy's expression is so weird to me. Something about his nose and mouth, almost like he's deliberately making a funny face, but he's not.

The Ten of Pentacles is bizarre too. There are four figures, clustered together, facing the same direction. It's hard to make out where the two middle people separate, unless I look very closely. I'm left wondering what these four have to do with anything.

But overall, the imagery in the deck is quite charming. In fact, while I am typing up this reading, I have just noticed something that I didn't notice before in one of the cards. The Four of Cups is another card I really like in this deck, but I wasn't going to mention it until this thing caught my eye. I just noticed that there are three daisies in the card, but they look for all the world to be photographs, compared with the lines of the other drawings in the card. I am staring and staring at this card and I can't figure it out! It is most curious! It almost looks like real life is poking through into a dream. Like that in-between state between dreaming and waking, when you hear something in the real world, but it plays out in your dream. This card even came up in a reading for a client this week, and I never even saw the daisies!

How it Reads

I have found this deck to read clearly and concisely. It works well to spark intuition, and can also be quite literal. It would be a great deck for storytelling and readings where you allow your imagination to wander and take you to places where you can use metaphorical references. It is easy to see a story unfolding in the imagery of the cards, and they blend together seamlessly.

I did find it interesting, as much as I like this deck, that I only chose it to read for certain clients this week. I didn't select it for any of my male clients, as the cards feel heavily feminine to me. And I also chose in favor of another deck when I read for a client who was feeling very downhearted. Looking through the deck, it does have a hint of melancholy to it, so I passed on this deck when I was looking for a decidedly more uplifting vibe. But when I did read with it, I found it to be lovely and charming, whimsical and honest.

Final Thoughts

The artwork in this deck is beautiful and it lends itself well to intuitive readings. The matte finish is quite nice, so the cards themselves are pleasant to work with. It's one of the most interesting and attractive decks I've seen published in quite awhile. A definite keeper and one that will remain in my regular rotation of reading decks.

— Tarot Dame Blogspot

$21.95