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The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Vampire Tarot Deck
Vampire Tarot Deck
What customers are saying about Vampire Tarot
 
I own this tarot deck and I fell in love with it. Each card has such character and is poignantly beautiful. I did a reading for a friend with it and she kept commenting on the eyes of the characters. You look at them and they seem to be looking at you. There is something deeply moving about the cards. I would look through them all over and over as each one is a work of art. My favorites were the Sun, the Hermit and the Fool. I adored this deck because it wasn’t all flowers and smiles. It was a bit gothic, striking and different. I wouldn't say it's dark and evil. It's just elaborate and gothic looking. People have long held a fascination with vampires because of their mystique and we all want to know what lurks in the shadows. In this deck, the vampires come out of the shadows. I would be picky with decks and never had much love for the traditional Rider-Waite as I found it "boring". Vampire Tarot is eccentric, alluring and different. I would really recommend it to anyone looking for an individualistic tarot deck. Let the eyes draw you in.
—Martha Clark, Amazon customer

I find this deck mesmerizing and accurate. The blood element may freak some people out, but it really isn't as macabre as it seems. The blood in this case is meant to represent life, so this deck really gets its message across in a different and powerful way.
 
I often take them out just to look at them. True the cards don't have a zillion things happening on them, but I find those kinds of decks taxing and needlessly complex. We aren't stupid, we don't need a thousand tiny details to understand what the cards are telling us. What I really appreciate about the Vampire Tarot is that, unlike so many other decks where the characters are distant and passive, in this deck the characters appear to acknowledge your presence and seem to be active participants in the reading. Another great thing about the Vampire Tarot is that the booklet provided with the cards explains the symbolism of the artwork of all 78 cards as well as their upright and reversed meanings. The cards are also very well glossed, and are a very good size to shuffle normally.
 
I highly recommend this deck to anyone ready to graduate from simply reading the cards to really understanding and working with the cards.
—“M from Manitoba”, Amazon customer

The pictures are beautiful, scary and completely hypnotic. Anyone who does tarot and does it consistently will agree that some decks have a bit of personality during some readings. This one packs a punch. Brutal honesty, meant to be that snarky advice that snaps you out of your "issues".
 
I'm aware that some tarot decks are just lovely pictures, but buy this deck in full confidence if you're looking for a deck that doesn't candy coat it's messages. Other decks are vague and fanciful...this one skips the sweets and right to business. Vampire Tarot is the best tarot deck I own.
“ShadowsCursed”, Amazon customer

II have never come upon such an intriguing and inspiring deck. It is my favorite, and I use it constantly. The Vampires have become my friends. I can consult them on anything from the wisdom of a financial venture to the well-being of my family. Of course they don’t always tell me what I want to hear, but they do always tell me what I need to know. For this, I love them.
I highly recommend this deck for those who are passionate about dark literary and fantasy figures such as vampires. Those who are intrigued by the unusual and the visually beautiful will also find this deck very appealing.
Cathi Bitzer, Aeclectic Tarot

I purchased this deck on a whim because the beautiful artwork was completely irresistible. Hertz's dark and brooding but beautiful characters HAD to come home with me, though I doubted I would ever use this deck in a reading. After examining it further, however, I am quite pleased with my spontaneous buy. It seems to be a rather accurate, if sometimes humorously gruesome deck.
Many of the cards in this deck draw on familiar images from standard decks such as the Rider-Waite, yet still hold their own in artistic expression. The High Priestess, for example, has on her familiar Hathor-like crown of glory, but it is formed from her hair, seeming to indicate this position is from her own achievement, not one bestowed upon her. The Strength card depicts a woman with her typical enormous feline companion, but it is the woman who is wild and needs taming. 
This deck is not only for the eyes, however. Since we all have dark sides, and skeletons in our closets, this may be the perfect deck to use when confronting difficult and dark issues. While the Justice card in most decks is righteous, honorable and regal, the Justice in this deck scares the bejeebers out of me! But perhaps that is the point. The whole theme of this deck is a look into the darker world, the world of Vampires. If I, or someone I loved, were threatened in any way, you'd bet I could become the Justice depicted here. She conveys a power and fierce strength that few people are willing to acknowledge they have. And though the pictures in this deck deal with the most base of human issues - survival - there is an honesty about Nathalie's creatures that many of us have lost. They are unashamedly themselves, with no apologies offered. Taking a step into the world of Natalie Hertz's vampires could oddly enough reveal a more human you. 

Napaea, Aeclectic Tarot
$21.95
Whimsical Tarot Deck
Whimsical Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about Whimsical Tarot

The Whimsical Tarot is a lot of fun -- although I originally bought it for my children to use, I found myself drawn to some of the really clever imagery. Hanson-Roberts uses traditional fairy tale characters to portray the divinatory meanings of each card. The Major Arcana, in particular, are well chosen, as are the court cards. This is a great deck to use if you're teaching kids the Tarot, or if you just want to expand your own horizons a bit. The artwork is lovely, and the card associations are clearly thought out. Definitely worth buying, if you enjoy Tarot and classic children's stories!

—Patti Wigington, About.com


Drawn by Mary-Hanson Roberts, who also created the art for the Hanson-Roberts Tarot and the Universal Waite Tarot, the Whimsical Tarot is based on fairy tales and nursery rhymes and intended for children and the 'young at heart'.

But it is by no means limited to children. The fairytales are familiar to almost everyone, the simplicity and already associated meaning with the cards helping to make tarot more accessible to a beginner.

Some of the cards make me chuckle, others I find impressive because of the approachable rendering of normally disliked cards. The Devil card, for example, shows a pair of hands controlling a marionette, a puppet on strings. The Death card is Sleeping Beauty.

I adore the backs of the cards. A lilac flower is in a rectangular focus in the center of the card. Surrounded by a mauve border, then a thicker border of yellow Celtic knot work on a turquoise background, it is restful, appropriate for upright or reversed readings, and very pretty.

I highly recommend the Whimsical Tarot as a child's tarot deck; for people who read for children; or for sensitive souls who aren't keen on confronting images on their tarot cards. The Whimsical Tarot gets the message across without being dark, negative or scary.

I also think it is a good beginners deck, as the fairytales used on each card allow the tarot novice to hang the tarot concepts on a framework they are familiar with. Learning seventy-eight different tarot meanings and how to interpret the tarot symbols can very seem daunting, but the Whimsical Tarot's cards are cute and the scenes already familiar. Hanson-Roberts combined traditional fairytales and tarot make a beautifully presented, sweet, and thoroughly whimsical tarot deck.

—Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


She sat down and flipped through the deck, her eyes lighting up as the realized that she recognized all the fairytales and stories within each card. She squealed with excitement when the 4 of Swords reminded her of the Princess and the Pea, and she jumped up and down in her seat happily as the Magician bought back the story of Puss in Boots. When she had finished looking through the deck, she handed it back to me, with a grin from ear to ear adorning her face: My Mother appeared to like the deck.

As can be seen from my Mother's reaction, the Whimsical Tarot is aimed at children and the young at heart. The cards are adorned with fairytales, nursery rhymes, and stories that we were told as children, and as such, there are many adults who can use this deck very effectively. The benefits of using fairytales and such to illustrate the meanings of the cards is that nearly everybody is familiar with most of them, and thus can understand the meaning in the card without having to look in any book. Fairytales bring back fond memories of childhood, and those nights on the sofa with your Granny, when she would make you hot chocolate and then read Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm to you until you were too sleepy to stay awake any longer. The attraction of a deck surrounded by, and based upon, these stories is understandable.

This deck is largely traditional: the names of the cards, the suits of the Minors, the ordering of the Majors, and the meanings of the cards are all Rider-Waite traditional. The only thing that differs is the pictures used to illustrate the cards, as these are taken directly from the fairy stories applied to each card. All of the cards are fully illustrated with the gorgeous artwork of Mary Hanson-Roberts. The Court Cards are particularly appealing, all being characters from stories, with the Queen and King usually being from the same story, eg- King and Queen of Pentacles being Maid Marion and Robin Hood. The Pages in this deck are the most interesting I have come across, and certainly the easiest to understand! Instead of showing people, they show objects, which convey the meaning of the card. For instance, the Page of Swords shows a telescope, and the Page of Pentacles shows gold coins, scales, and a tally-chart. This is a great help, especially for young children and beginners, as it is often the Court Cards that are the most difficult to read.

All the fairytales are well chosen and very evocative. Every other deck I have seen which uses fairytales as its theme has failed in that sometimes the chosen fairytales are chosen superficially, for instance, in one deck I found that the Emperor card was represent by the Emperor's New Clothes, which really didn't have anything to do with the meaning at all. With this deck, that's not the case: Every single card's fairytale is chosen for its meaning and significance. That is an achievement within itself I think, and something that this deck deserves praise for.

I love this deck. It is the best one I have seen which is aimed at children, but which also proves to be an excellent deck for adults! Children, beginners, adults who enjoy fairy stories, collectors, and those who like Mary Hanson-Roberts' artwork would all enjoy this deck immensely and learn alot from it. For myself, after using this deck, I found that I could read better in general: the meanings of the cards took on a more imaginative form, and I could apply meanings from the cards to the querent's life very easily. As an introduction to the Tarot, or as a deck for the more advanced reader, this is an absolute treasure.

—Kim Huggens, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot has a great richness to it because it is drawing on our knowledge of fairy tales as well as our knowledge of the Tarot. It works well for intuitive readings based on the images which can speak directly to us at a deep level. Although it may look like a children's deck it is suitable for anyone who is happy with an attractive, amusing deck which has more depth to it than appears at first glance. 


—Fairyhedgehog, Aeclectic Tarot


I have recommended this deck to everyone I know interested in Tarot and while at first they read reviews and see the deck and question me, once they USE the deck for the first time, they are hooked! As the author states in her introduction, the images are intended to appeal to our inner child, our earliest memories and our connections to fairy tales and their distinct sense of right and wrong, good and evil. These descriptions, again, seem simplistic and very black and white, and life deals us, like the Tarot, a mixed bag with gray areas, this deck comes through with clear messages and direction. Like our proverbial Knight in Shining Armor, the message in a spread heralds in with ease and in a manner that allow for deeper reflection as you view the images on the cards.

The artwork in this deck cannot be complimented enough. The images perfectly match the descriptions. Ms. Morrison, in her introduction, compliments Ms. Hanson-Roberts with seeing within her own mind and having an innate understanding of her ideas. This is true for this deck like no other I have encountered. There is a perfect congruity between image and word.

—Kate Robinson, Aeclectic Tarot


The Whimsical Tarot approaches the reading of cards from a completely different aspect -- by associating with childhood images and fairy tales. This deck allows us to connect with our "inner child". Although the name may suggest this is a less than serious deck, this deck is a very valuable tool in discovering our inner selves and helping us reconnect with those simple things that give us joy.

The images on the cards do not obviously correspond with the imagery from our experiences with the Rider-Waite style of decks. Gone are the confusing "Quabalah mystery" symbolism that we pondered and studied in order to interpret the meanings of those older decks. This is the use of simple and obvious imagery that gives us instant insight into the meaning of the cards.

The images are drawn from well-known fairy tales and are familiar to just about anyone. The artwork of Mary Hanson-Robert is clean. She gives us very colorful images that attract attention but are not obtrusive. The artwork is not distracting, but is lovely to sit and reflect upon.

As we explore the deck, we find some familiar tarot references. We do have a Major Arcana comprised of 22 cards, all clearly marked with the number of the card in its order, and the name of the card. There is no mistaking the card's association. The Fool - 0 - is the scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz. If you look at the tarot as a personal journey of the one who begins as a fool, this association is very obvious. We have the symbolism of the yellow brick road, we have Toto and so much more. The Magician is Puss in Boots, the High Priestess is the Fairy Godmother. There are some very interesting associations, as with The Emperor being Father Christmas, the Old Woman in the Shoe for the Empress, Judgment using The Cricket from Pinnochio, Glinda for The World, "Goldilocks being discovered" as Justice. The images are so obvious in some instances, yet they challenge you to use your own judgment and personal insights.

I also find myself drawing on my own knowledge of the tarot and associations when I am using this deck. While someone who is not familiar with the traditional meanings of the tarot will find this a very easy and fun deck to use, those of us who are trained in the traditional meanings will not find this "foreign" as there are familiar associations here. When we look at the "Two of Cups", the traditional meaning being a lesser "Lovers" card, it's association is still retained with the story of the "Owl and the Kitty Cat", so we are not totally out of familiar grounds. Pentacles still retains its meaning of material matters while cups still reflects inner emotions. The "Ten of Swords", a card of chaos and mistakes, shows the story of Humpty Dumpty falling off the wall. The traditional meanings are not told in the mysterious symbolism but in very obvious and well thought through imagery.

The small details on the cards not only attract attention but allow special reflection and a good look at one's inner self. And these special touches make this a remarkable deck. I love this deck for personal contemplation. I have also used this deck for clients who wanted to examine their own personal feelings and issues and it has provided much insight. It works as well with clients as it does with personal readings.

I would also like to suggest that if you have a youngster who is interested in tarot cards and readings, that this would make a perfect first deck. As our children watch us using the cards, they will also want to explore the path with you, as all children look to their parents for guidance. This deck is so perfect for the younger apprentice that I couldn't think of any deck more perfect for the "almost teenager" or the "First Deck" gifting. If you are looking for something that is perfect for a holiday gift, or someone just starting, or the "first deck" give this deck a viewing and see if you don't agree this could be the deck for you.

—Margaret Foster, Amazon customer

$21.95
Aquarian Tarot Deck Italian
Aquarian Tarot Deck Italian

 

What customers are saying about Aquarian Tarot

The Aquarian Tarot by David Palladini does exactly what the Tarot should do!!! That is—act as A Catalyst for the floodgates of one's own psychic abilities to open, flow and be directed...Along the path of mans' physical and spiritual life on the earth plane. The Palladini Aquarian deck offers all of the important symbolism for each card in an obvious ANd Mystical manner - allowing the reader to be lead psychically down the correct path. Unlike many other "Pretty" & "Weird" decks which abound - the Aquarian deck does not keep you spell bound to the cards themselves trying to decipher them but rather their meanings being instantly recognized by the reader, does it's job by sending our psyche away from the cards and directly into the cosmos of transmitted visuals and thought communications from the universe. Transmittals relevant to the questions being posed by the client. I'm on my 3rd deck of Pallidini's and have never found another to replace them!

KosmicLinda (professional reader of 35 years)


This deck is old by many standards but the artwork still remains rather unique and revealing in many ways. It has an 'ancient' feel but also a 'modern' feel that many enjoyed getting readings with and is a sure winner for a primer deck!

Yukio, Amazon customer


David Palladini's Aquarian Tarot is a beautiful deck in the Rider-Waite tradition. I was attracted to it by the wonderful art-deco style and the watercolors, both of which appeal to my sensibilities. This deck is very emotive - there's a strong sense of feeling that emanates from these cards, and it is often that feeling, rather than the imagery depicted, that informs my reading with them.

—R. Perkins, Amazon customer

$20.00
African Tarot
African Tarot

What customers are saying about African Tarot 

 
This could very well be the single cutest tarot deck in existence.
The title "African Tarot" is probably quite offputting to many people: are the art and descriptions specifically meant for Black people? Not at all. I am a black woman in Washington state and have showed this deck to countless white friends who have found it adorable. Its booklet displays meanings that seem pretty much standard to Rider-Waite system. Indeed, I've seen this deck defined as a "Rider-Waite clone".
 
The suits are also traditional: Wands, Swords, Cups and Pentacles. However, in the artwork the Swords are depicted as spears, the Cups as gourds and the Pentacles as golden discs. It is a very colorful (mainly primary colors, even), happy little deck, even though the people rarely give more than a vague Mona Lisa-type smile, if that. They have dark skin and dredlocks, but that's about where any cultural departure ends.
 
The artwork, however, was the clincher for me. There are a lot of "whimsical" decks out there with "childlike" art, but so help me, the art on the African Tarot is something I'd be *proud* to display on my 'fridge. It's childlike, but also of good quality and seems very secure in itself, a rarity in many homegrown "whimsical" decks.
The cards are approximately 3" x 2.5" and covered with what I assume is a standard, slick coating. This makes them easy to shuffle, but I have a habit of dropping some cards if I'm just going through them while holding them in my hands. The design on the back is as charming as each individual card design -- two spotted tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see either of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers the tortoise a symbol of "the slow coming of justice". Appropriate, no?
 
The deck comes in a brown, corregated cardboard container, which, after a few years of ownership, still seems quite sturdy. Both sides of the box are decorated with the same cardstock as the deck, with hints of the art style and relevant information printed on them. It gives the box a very environmental feel that goes with the deck very well.
The authors have subtitled the deck "Journey Into the Self." It is meant to be a lighter deck, and a loved deck. For me, it is. Very much loved, in fact. However, don't let the "lighter" aspect fool you. One of the spookiest tarot experiences I've ever had, involving a lost -- and later recovered -- card and some odd correspondences, happened involving this deck. It's not a *fluff* tarot. I would consider it more of a powerful specialty deck.
 
—Ashe Monday, Aeclectic Tarot 

I have previously used the Rider-Waite deck and found it to be rather "stuffy" for my tastes. I purchased the African Tarot deck at the recommendation of others and love it. I have already used it several times - it has wonderful pictures and I get a great feel from the images and explanations on the cards. You will not be disappointed!
 
—“Book Fiend”, Amazon Customer

This has got to be the cutest deck ever! It is a Rider-Waite variation and has been created mainly for beginners. Colorful, light-hearted and whimsical, this deck is really small (2.5 - 3 inches) and looks like it has been drawn by children. There is no real traditional African art on these cards, but there is the flair of an African village in all scenes, and the faces of the people are black. If you like light-hearted and fun decks, this will probably become a favorite for you.
 
Katerina, U.K. Amazon customer

A lot of people may be put off by the idea of an "African Tarot Deck," thinking that it must involve voodoo, arcane tribal symbolism, or just be for black people. Well, I'm a black woman who has shown this deck to white friends -- this deck is completely accessible.
 
The "African Tarot: Journey into the Self" is a teeny little deck based on Rider-Waite symbology. It also looks like it was drawn by a child with talent -- the sort of art that you'd *want* to put on your fridge. The people are brown and have kinky hair, and they live in an African village -- after that, and a few liberties with the suit cards -- it's a standard deck.
 
The suits, by the way, are traditionally named. However, the art shows Swords as spears, Cups as gourds and Pentacles as coins or disks. The art is rich and perhaps a tad dark for some, perhaps it's best not to read this one in low light -- but then, it's far from a gothic deck. The back design is equally darling -- two colorful tortoises in the sun, reversed from each other so you can see one of them upright as long as you're holding the card lengthwise. According to the South African author, the Shangaan culture considers this animal a symbol of "the slow coming of justice" -- appropraite enough considering its country of origin.
 
I even find the package a total keeper: a brown, corrugated cardboard box with descriptive cards glued to the back and front. A rubberband to keep the box closed and you could probably drop this deck into your backpack and only have the box take damage. However, the box is so cute, why would you want to?
 
The little booklet inside confirms the image that this is a feel-good deck -- many of the interpretations are positive or at least encouraging of growth. So, while this isn't an all-occasion deck, I certainly think it's worth a look!
 
—R. Byrd, Amazon custome
$18.95
Barbara Walker Tarot in a Tin
Barbara Walker Tarot in a Tin

What customers are saying about Barbara Walker Tarot:

The Major and Minor Arcana are fully illustrated with rich, colorful designs that were hand painted by Barbara Walker. They are finely detailed and realistic. Some of the figures are partially or completely unclothed. For those who are sensitive to this, there is nothing lewd or gratuitous about these depictions. The suits are Cups, Wands (which are actual wands, not tree branches), Pentacles (which are actual pentacles, not discs or coins) and Swords. Each card is named and the Major Arcana is also numbered. The meaning of each Minor Arcana card is distilled into one key word that is printed above the picture, while its individual designation is printed below.

Barbara Walker's interpretations are rooted in Tantric philosophy; and the pictures illustrate religious ideas from India, through the Middle East and into Europe, as she believes the Tarot cards themselves evolved. There are no images representing African (other than Egyptian), East Asian, Pan-Pacific or Native American cultures. Ms. Walker does not incorporate orthodox Christian beliefs. She explains in her book how the church co-opted many pagan traditions into its dogma (intentionally or otherwise) and some cards may seem to illustrate these beliefs.

Anyone familiar with the Rider-Waite or Marseille Tarot will recognize the symbolism easily, although there are a few exceptions and some subtle changes. Instead of a disembodied hand holding the symbol for the Aces, a full-fledged representation of the Goddess is clearly illustrated. Ms. Walker maintains that the Major Arcana are symbols of initiation into the mysteries of the pre-Christian religions, where the Triple Goddess reigned supreme and reincarnation was accepted. To that end, she removes the more obvious interpretations based on patriarchal bias and restores the original matrifocal intent. The most obvious departure from other decks is the depiction of the court cards. They are Kings, Queens, Princes and Princesses, and they are each given the specific name and image of a God or Goddess that represent the characteristics of that card. The King and Queen and the Prince and Princess are paired according to specific mythologies. For example, the King and Queen of Swords are Indias Yama [godlike authority, powerful judge, discipline and order] and Kali [fatal decisions, swift action, deprivation or widowhood], the Prince and Princess of Cups are Britains Galahad [gallantry, courtesy, capacity for self-sacrifice] and Elaine [mystical insight, hidden knowledge, poetic inspiration]. This is a great help to me in interpreting the court cards, which can be very similar in their traditional representations.

— E. Y. Ivanova, Aeclectic Tarot


The Barbara Walker Tarot belongs to another era and this is probably why it fascinates me and goes unmentioned by others. It is the kind of deck that I like to read with using one card draws; shuffle and think of one aspect of an issue, cut and read the uppermost card. Then ask another question, shuffle, cut, read. I enjoy having conversations like this with a deck.  There are no ambivalent cards in this deck; all the Minor Arcana seem either forceful or diminishing in influence and are quite easy to read as a result (for me anyway) despite the unfamiliar mythological archetypes. The world is full of decks that want to make us feel good about ourselves decks that want to delude us, distract us with their prettiness, give us the answers we secretly think we want. Not this one. The Barbara Walker Tarot is uncompromising in its strangeness. Asking it for answers can feel at first like tapping the hardened, barren, cruel earth for answers. There is something heartless and savage about it on first impressions, but looking at it now makes me reflect on the path tarot has taken over the last 25 years; it has lost some of its weirdness and now tries to manufacture it again with the trend for dark decks, though we need look no further than the Barbara Walker Tarot; they don’t come much darker than this.

—My Curious Cabinet

$18.95
Gummy Bear Tarot Deck
Gummy Bear Tarot Deck

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT GUMMY BEAR TAROT

This is indeed my favorite deck and I will keep using it over and over again. It is cute and adorable and perfect for smaller hands. I wasn't sure if I would even resonate with such a deck, but decks can surprise you. If you want younger people to get into card reading, this is a perfect deck. 

It is set up in the Rider Waite style, which I love. I learned on the original Rider Waite deck growing up. This deck totally doesn't have an evil vibe in the entire deck. I smile every time I see it. I want to thank U.S. Games for having the courage to put out a deck like this. I really do LOVE it! A definite must buy! Get it now!

—Toni Walker, Divine You Blogspot


"Gummy Bears are a tradition enjoyed by generations. Who better to turn to for inspiration or a new outlook on life?" This quote from the 59-page companion booklet from the Gummy Bear Tarot from U.S. Games by Dietmar Bittrich says it all, do not dismiss this deck as juvenile, as I did for a long time before examining it closer!

The art style most certainly is simplistic, although it does closely follow Rider-Waite in a very pared-down way. However, this serves to make it very easy for the intuitive Tarot reader from beginner to advanced to just blossom with psychic inspiration. I feel the clarity of the cards, the 'crayola'-like colors, and the happy images help the alpha waves flow. The fronts of the cards have a minimal white border, and the Major Arcana are labeled with the Title and also with the number (Fool=0). Some of my favorite Major cards are the Devil and Death, and the Hierophant (who appears female to me). The Minors are labeled also, and two of my favorites are the 5 of Pentacles, with two forsaken Gummies outside the church (one lame), and the ominous black-caped Gummy of the 5 of Cups. The backs of the cards have 16 bears, 4 rows of 4, red, blue, green, and white. It is impossible to tell from the back if you have drawn a reversed card.

When reading with this deck, I found it very easy and a pleasure to use. It is definitely querent friendly. The booklet recommends using the Celtic Spread, or one- to three-card readings. As far as meanings of the cards, the meanings in the booklet assigned to the cards are slightly different and much more positive than Rider Waite, and there are no "reversal" meanings per se, only "strengths" and "weaknesses. One thing I loved about the booklet is that for every card, despite strength or weakness, it has an assigned "Task" per card, such as for 5 of Cups the Task is "Renewal". This is a very easy concept for anyone, your querent, or yourself if meditating with the deck to grasp.

A definite plus is that it comes in a cute little tin for card safekeeping. I would highly recommend this deck to both new and advanced readers. New readers can easily learn from the numbering of the cards, and the simplicity of the meanings in the booklets, especially the "tasks"; and advanced readers, especially Gummy lovers or Rider-Waite or Hansen-Roberts readers will be refreshed by the art and get many laughs. That alone is worth the price of the deck!

—Debra Madigan, Aeclectic Tarot


This is my new favorite deck, and I own about a dozen. I look forward to my daily reading and find these cards are easy to connect with and very accurate and easy to read. They are elemental and whimsical at the same time. A very wonderful deck for beginners, old timers and a great teaching tool for kids. They are a sweet and tasty treat I enjoy every day. Try some ..a healthy and enlightening snack.

Feona Willow, Amazon customer


Ah, ya gotta love the Gummy Bear Tarot. I don't like eating gummy bears, but as tarot characters, they are simply irresistible! First of all, it's one of the decks US Games has packaged in a tin, which is such a brilliant idea. And like the other tarot-in-a-tin decks (Vanessa and Halloween), the deck is pocket sized and printed on matte card stock. So right out of the gate, it's got three things going for it. And we haven't even gotten to the reading of the cards yet.

The Gummy Bear Tarot follows the traditional RWS imagery so it is ready to read right out of the box. The vibrant colors and G-rated illustrations make it ideal for children or those less comfortable with the "scarier" images in traditional tarot. It's also a great deck for when you want truthful readings, but you want them presented in a more light-hearted manner. For example, I had a particularly difficult week, and I wanted to use a deck that would lift my spirits, while not necessarily sugar coating the readings. This was the perfect choice, and it did just that.

You would think that with such a silly premise, this feel-good deck wouldn't be able to provide serious readings. You would be mistaken. This deck speaks in a very easy manner, and is very straightforward in its messages. I can see it easily being used for everyday reading.

The LWB is great too. It is deck-specific and provides interesting insights into the cards. What I love about it is that they don't give the usual upright and reversed meanings. Instead, they provide "strengths" and "weaknesses" for each card, so if you don't read reversals you can still get a full, balanced sense of each card. Also, each strength and weakness is accompanied by a wise (and often humorous) saying and a task.

I think the Gummy Bear Tarot is a great all-purpose deck. It has surprised me by sneaking into my list of favorite reading decks. It's kid-friendly, it's adult-friendly, what more could you want?

—Kiki, Tarot Dame Blogspot

$18.95
Sun and Moon in a Tin
Sun and Moon in a Tin

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT SUN AND MOON TAROT

Illustrator Vanessa Decort has created a stunning yet simple deck with her Sun And Moon Tarot. On close inspection, there is a richness and complexity that draws you in and lends new, subtle nuances to your tarot readings. Decort describes the deck this way: "The Sun And Moon Tarot considers universal archetypes and cultural symbols, and also incorporates the artist's own personal symbols."

Based on the Thoth deck, it stays true to the titles that Aleister Crowley used (ex: 7 of Pentacles - Failure; Art - Temperance; Princes and Princes rather than Knights and Pages). I've always been somewhat intimidated by the Thoth deck but Decort has taken that influence and infused it with an almost playful, childlike essence. This could be because she has a background as an illustrator for children's books or perhaps she simply wanted to deliver the wisdom of the Thoth deck in a more whimsical and accessible manner. The result is an inviting, fun deck that never loses its Thoth roots.

This is a well-made deck on sturdy card stock with a somewhat matte finish. It felt great in my hands, shuffled well and seemed built to last. This is very important to me as I tend to be hard on my decks through constant use. The back of the deck is a gorgeous black and white mandala - and it's reversible, another small detail that I like.

Each image is framed by white borders with titles (in English) and numbers clearly printed. Colors are bold yet muted. I especially liked the choices for the Minors suits - neutral, earthy tones for Earth; dark grey, burnt sienna and orange flames for Fire; rich midnight blue for Water; and light sky blue for Air. These color schemes make sense and allow the reader to instantly know which suit they are working with before they even glance at the title.

There are strong Kabbalah and alchemy influences throughout the deck - each Major has a Hebrew letter and the elemental symbols appear on every minor. Yogic images are scattered about - fro the OM symbol in the Hermit to the dancing Shiva as the Universe (World)!

The Major Arcana is especially rich with symbols - the yin and yang in the Temperance and the Phoenix in the Death card convey the meanings clearly. Astrological symbols are featured throughout the Majors - for example, the Cancer symbol on the chest of the driver in The Chariot or the ram's heads and lamb (Aries) in the Emperor.

One of the things I liked the best about this deck was the multicultural imagery. Rather than "standard" RWS people, there are all races represented here - black, white, dark haired, redheads and more. This gives the deck a "modern" appeal and I happen to like that as my own personal life is diverse - so seeing this detail made me feel more connected to the deck.

I'm giving this deck two Swords up. It is a unique and interesting deck for any tarot lover's collection.

—Theresa Reed, “The Tarot Lady”

$18.95
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin
The Wonderland Tarot in a Tin

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE WONDERLAND TAROT

The collaborative team of Christopher and Morgana Abbey beautifully adapted the style and flavor of Sir John Tenniel's illustrations of Lewis Carroll's work to fit the typical Rider-Waite-Smith (RWS) system. The Major and Minor Arcanas are fully illustrated, facilitating the work of a reader who is familiar with the RWS symbolism. Of course, the replacement of the suits occasionally gives the reader pause (The Swords, Staves, Cups, and Pentacles are now Flamingos, Peppermills, Hats, and Oysters, respectively), but once the reader accommodates to that alteration, this deck is found to be quite easy to work with. The color and style of these cards provide a somewhat Victorianesque feel that may be quite appealing to many readers. One of the considerable benefits of this deck, however, is that the cards themselves are the approximate size of a standard playing deck. Readers who permit the querant to shuffle the cards may appreciate this, as many non-readers (indeed, as well as some readers!) have a difficult time shuffling the slightly larger sized cards that are characteristic of most Tarot decks. Individuals with more mundane plans for this deck are additionally fortunate in that the playing-card equivalent of the Minor Arcana is notated in the borders of each of the appropriate cards (e.g., the “Five of Spades” is noted in the border of the Five of Flamingos). Although best suited for someone who already possesses a bit of Tarot acumen, the little white book (LWB) included with the deck should be particularly helpful to those not already acquainted with Alice and her adventures. Each card is well described in terms of its depiction of characters and suggested divinatory meanings. In sum, the Wonderland Tarot is a surprisingly pleasant deck that provides a whimsical atmosphere, familiar symbolism, and convenience in handling. This is a marvelous combination for any Tarot deck.
—Tom LeBlanc, Aeclectic Tarot


One of the most noticeable things about this deck is that the traditional suits have been changed: swords = flamingos; rods = peppermills; cups = hats; and pentacles = oysters. The suits are also marked with the corresponding symbols from ordinary playing decks: hearts, diamonds, spades, and clubs. The artwork is based on that in Lewis Carroll's Wonderland books. All of the characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass appear, including the Walrus and the Carpenter, the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, Bill the Lizard, the Mock Turtle, and the Cheshire Cat. Lewis Carroll appears as the Magician. Of course Alice appears repeatedly throughout the deck.



The illustrations are well done and capture the spirit of the books, with story elements well matched to cards' meanings. The deck feels good to hold, in part because they are close to the size of a standard playing deck. Also, the cards are of sturdy high quality, and have a strong, positive metaphysical feeling. 
This is a very unique and original deck. I would suggest it to anyone who collects tarot or is a Wonderland fan.
—Amazon customer

$18.95
Vanessa Tarot
Vanessa Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT VANESSA TAROT:

The Vanessa Tarot does for illustrated pip Waite-Colman-Smith based decks, what Major Tom's Tarot de Marseille did for the Marseille version Tarots, and dragged it (the Tarot) into the 21st Century.

The Vanessa Tarot will perhaps be the most overlooked Tarot of 2007. 'Serious' Tarot folks will eschew it, many will never get past the Magician -- and will poo-poo it as a silly novelty. But the Vanessa deserves a closer look. It's nothing short of brilliant!

Let me start with the LWB -- it deserves framing. This should me the new standard for LWB's. It is well written, concise, and is arraigned by numerical value as opposed to suits. And what is said about each card -- makes sense. Some folks enjoy saying 'Tarot is a language', perhaps because such a statement eludes cogent response, However the Vanessa Tarot IS a language. Gone is the weighty esoteric symbology, leaving behind clean image concepts -- that translate smoothly into nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs and articles. Many cards easily fill encompass several of those labels.

Yes, it's a feminine deck albeit not feminist. Marketing may well relegate it to the early teen female market segment of the populations, and that’s a shame. The deck is also multicultural.

Some examples: The 10 of Wands eschews the burdening issues and displays an attitude of study -- or 'workload'. The Knight of Wands wears a parachute and stands in the doorway of an aircraft in flight. In the Four of Cups, she sits in front of the Tarot Café, while a hand enters the picture from the left offering a cup. It's tres mondo coolaroonie!

The cards measure 9.5cm x 6cm, perfect for your hands, and get this ... they come in a metal case.

This deck, and the LWB rock ...

-- Dan Pelletier, Aeclectic Tarot


The Vanessa Tarot is a glamorous and feminine interpretation of tarot into completely modern scenes and symbols. Created by talented Filipino illustrator and multimedia, Lynyrd Narciso, creator of the Sailor Moon Tarot and Tarot of the Lepidopteran People, it is his first deck to be picked up by a major publisher -- U.S. Games Systems.

The deck has been inspired by the heroines of pop culture (Jackie O and Sophia Loren are two recognisable women) and is wholly female, glam, young and modern in all its aspects. The cards were originally inspired by dolls, and in places the women retain a slightly big-eyed, big-headed anime look, but the colours are anything but lady-like, instead using rich, deep colours. They're also images of put-together, strong, capable women. They are judges in Justice, beauty queens in the Universe card, warriors in the Seven of Wands, and fashion designers in the Three of Coins. They ride motorbikes in the Knight of Swords, drive their own sports cards in the Chariot, and bake in the Kitchen in the Magician.

The women of the Vanessa Tarot almost entirely inhabit modern scenes and life in a way few decks have managed. It's not a tarot with a few contemporary scenes mixed in with the usual medieval Christian or occult symbolism, but a tarot that has been translated completely into modern lifestyles and references. Its illustrations include a Knight of Wands, poised to parachute out of a plane; the Knight of Swords riding a motorbike; the Ten of Wands, where a student works at a desk piled high with books, lit only by the glow of a desk lamp.

The cards have the Rider-Waite tradition at their foundation, but often move the scenes towards their more literal interpretations as well as more modern ones. The Queen of Swords in the deck is a veiled woman at a funeral; she is literally the widow or aloof woman. The Seven of Swords removes the ambiguity and shows a woman in the midst of a burglary, getting away with the safe.

The whole Vanessa Tarot set is a beautifully designed package of 78 small, matte, and easily-shuffled cards, 2 title cards, and a similarly small 32-page booklet, carried in a very durable purple tin box (not cardboard!) with a separate lid. Perfect for keeping in handbags, backpacks or purses.

Inside, the cards are about the same size as playing cards and fit easily in small hands. They are easily shuffled as they have a much more matte cardstock than is often usual for decks from US Games, and lack that tendency to slide off the table like a waterfall. The backs of the cards have a simple and reversible design of a purple background with blue stars and thin blue vertical stripes.

I'm a big fan of the Vanessa Tarot and its fun, feminine yet strong approach to tarot, without being flowery or fluffy. Lynyrd has translated conventional tarot scenes into more relevant scenes of contemporary life, making a deck that is easy for beginners to use and relate to without having to deeply delve into the study of tarot symbolism.

-- Solandia, Aeclectic Tarot


When the Vanessa Tarot arrived in the mail, the first thing I noticed was that I really liked its tin box. What a good idea it is to package a Tarot deck in a box that can actually be used to carry your cards in your purse! And that is when I started to understand Vanessa Tarot's real deal. Yes, this is exactly the deck to carry in your purse. And, if you are like the characters of this Tarot, your purse may be a Coach, a Louis Vuitton, or a khaki backpack or leather briefcase.
 I am in no way a designer girl. In fact, what I am is a crusty old Gloria Steinem-type feminist from the Seventies. But, as I looked through Vanessa Tarot that first time, I had to admit that this is really a special deck.
 Vanessa Tarot is smaller than most, measuring only about 2" by 3," according to my thumb. The card backs are reversible, and done in a nice purple pinstripe with lavender stars. The cardstock has a matte finish, and is of the good quality that we have come to expect from U.S. Games. Overall, it is a nice deck to look at and to hold in your hands. For all of its great quality and special packaging, Vanessa Tarot retails at only $15. That, girls, will leave you some money left over to spend at the mall!


Vanessa Tarot comes with a standard-sized LWB (Little White Book) that gives quick descriptions of the Major Arcana card images, and upright and reversed meanings for all the cards. The Minor Arcana is sorted by numbers rather than suits, and there is a paragraph about each number preceding the interpretations for the four cards of each number set. Each Vanessa Tarot card is illustrated with cartoon-like drawings of women and girls. There are some male figures in the deck, but they are supporting characters. Vanessa Tarot pays tribute to the girls and women of pop culture from today and yesteryear. Television and movie stars make an appearance, as do many "types" of modern women. There are businesswomen, glamour girls and daredevils. They are all either pretty or cute, and all skinny. They are dressed in styles from many periods of fashion.
 The Minor Arcana cards are as detailed as the Majors, which is a feature I appreciate.
 The deck truly won my heart when I saw that my favorite TV character from childhood, Samantha Stevens (Bewitched, played by Elizabeth Montgomery) appears in her classic pose, sitting on her broomstick, as the Eight of Wands.
.

I passed the deck around to many of my students. Overall, the reaction was positive. Many felt that this would be a particularly good "first deck" for our daughters. Even some of the more mature students liked it, especially those with an eye for glamour and fashion. One older student, whose favorite expression is "It's all about the outfit!" was particularly taken with it.
 Another great thing about Vanessa Tarot is that none of the images are particularly dark or scary. This would be a great deck for some of the professional bookings that I often get, in nightclubs, at college parties and all-night high school graduation parties. 
And what about my crusty feminist self? Well, bear in mind that the second deck I ever owned was the Motherpeace, and I have a particular penchant for Goddess Tarot decks, such as the beautiful one by Kris Waldherr. But Vanessa Tarot, with all of its cuteness and glamour and designer-type fashion, is the only one I have seen that had the ovaries to make all four Kings female! Yes, all of the main characters are female. And they all seem pretty happy doing what they're doing, whether it’s being dressed to the nines, keeping house or jumping out or an airplane. And if that's not female empowerment, I don't know what is!

-- Christiana Gaudet, Tarot by Christiana

$18.95
Tiny Tarot Key Chain
Tiny Tarot Key Chain

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE TINY TAROT KEY CHAIN

 

It’s an itsy bitsy teensy weensy yell…  Wait, no it’s not. However, the Tiny Universal Waite Tarot Keychain is probably the most adorable little thing in the Tarot world.

This charming, petite but complete 78-card deck which is illustrated by Pamela Coleman-Smith and re-colored by Mary Hanson-Roberts measures in at 1 3/8” tall by ¾” wide. The deck and Little White Book are housed in a hard, clear, plastic container that snaps closed and feels pretty secure, but does not “lock” closed. The container has a ball chain – Keychain attached to the outside, which can be used to secure the container to one’s own keychain. The set comes in a cardboard hanging display type of package.

 

The deck is a traditional Rider-Waite-Smith with Courts titled: King, Queen, Knight and Page. The Suits are:  Swords, Wands, Cups and Pentacles. Strength is number VIII and Justice is XI. The softer coloring done by Mary Hanson-Roberts is fresh and appealing. The back of the deck is done in blues and features an eclipse with stars above and below and is reversible friendly.

 

The Sun is the traditional Universal Waite image with a blond, naked toddler carrying an orange flag, sitting a white pony in the foreground, with sunflowers and the Sun in the back ground. The LWB says “Satisfaction, Success, Happiness, Contentment and Security.”

Judgement features a pink and purple winged, blond angel, blowing a trumpet and people rising up from the ground with their arms outstretched. The LWB says “Determination, Outcome, Result, Decision, Promotion, Atonement.”

 

The 10 of Cups shows a family rejoicing under a blue sky and rainbow of 10 cups. The LWB says “Pleasure, Peace, Good family, Honor, Joy, Love, Contentment.”

The deck is not in order when it arrives. The cards themselves are flexible, but there really is not a way to shuffle it due to its size. I would suggest either mixing them around on a smooth surface or dropping the deck in a small bag, shaking it and drawing from the bag.  The cards feel like they may be easy to bend and there are perforation marks on each side.

 

The LWB is a folded strip of paper that measures 9 ¾” long x 1 ½” wide. It features keywords for each of the Major Arcana and the Minor Arcana in suit order. It also covers a “10 Card Spread” which is laid out similar to a Celtic Cross but the positions have a bit of a different meaning.  Once I unfolded the LWB, I did have a challenge folding it back the way it came.

 This deck may not be the best to use as a reading deck for those who have issues with muscle control in their hands or poor vision. 

This deck can be just the thing for those Tarot craft projects. At the Bay Area Tarot Symposium I have witnessed attendees sporting this fashionable deck, made into earrings and necklaces. It could also make a wonderful gift or stocking stuffer for your favorite Tarotist.

The Tiny Universal Waite Tarot Keychain is the perfect size to use as an on the go deck when one doesn’t want to carry a full size deck. It is the ideal size to go on a keychain, in a back-pack, purse or to carry in the glove box.  

 

 

– by Terri Clement, American Tarot Association

$9.95