Reblog: Tarot Blog Hop, Lammas 2015: Shining and Mercurial…Aren’t We All?

During the last Tarot Blog Hop, Maureen Aisling Duffy-Bose shared her thoughts on the topic using our own Haindl Tarot. She kindly gave permission to reblog her entire piece here. You can visit Aisling at her blog: TarotWitchery.

Tarot Blog Hop, Lammas 2015: Shining and Mercurial…Aren’t We All?

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Our Wrangler for this Hop, the creative Joanne Sprott, invited us to discuss the influence of Astrology on the interpretations of Tarot. I am vastly intrigued by this topic, because I teach a class combining one’s Astrology sign with the Fool’s Journey, so I have a rather complex interaction with both planetary alignments and tarot trumps. So–Sun, Mercury, Me (and You, too…) Hmmm….let’s chat about it. How do we Be this?

The Sun in my usual interpretation of the Tarot has to do with active energy, male energy, the God, the “power hand”, and other concepts that are related to “shining forth”. We look at the Sun as the harbinger of life, that without which the crops cannot grow, that shining light which cannot and does not conceal itself. We know in our hearts who we Are, and our Sun Sign in the Astrological world is supposed to be a template for that awareness. Our Being is not chained to the esoteric meaning of our Sun Sign in our Birth Chart, but we do see some similarities between the explanation of our Sun’s qualities and some of our own inner impulses on how we choose to express our Selves. In my deck of choice, the Haindl Tarot, the Sun shines over a complex horizon, focusing on the single rose in the foreground, and it seems obvious that the flower’s petals are basking in the light, but no two of them are similar in their angle of orientation, representing the many facets of the illuminated personality.

Mercury, on the other hand, only shines when he wants to. The Trickster, the Fool, he who mutates at Will, he who makes it impossible to predict that which he will do, this is the alignment of Mercury both in ancient mythos and in Astrology. We see the placement of Mercury in our charts as the awareness of our Being, and how we communicate that to others, both in words and in actions. But we also recognize that the shining light of the Sun will sometimes choose to hide in the shadow of mercurial thought and action, and that we can understand our own Being from being able to mutate and codify our way of interaction with events, life changes, and other beings. Therefore, in my opinion, there is usually no single card in the Tarot deck which always aligns with Mercury…this alignment is dependent upon circumstance. I often remind people that the Fool in the Tarot is not called the Fool because s/he is stupid, but to represent the openness of the zero, the unfilled circle, which can be filled at Will, and because the Fool also calls to mind the medieval custom of the one person in the King’s Court who could speak truth to royalty with no fear of retribution, as well as representing the concept of acting and speaking without thought for consequences (being “Foolish”) which, in the modern world, does sometimes not work out so well. So, in the Haindl deck, there is a Trickster whose actions have come home to roost, who holds the bleeding swan, gazing into the distance with a look of loss upon his face…and yet, in the background, there seems to be a chance of rebirth, of another choice, of more possibilities to fill that zero. The astrological sign on this card is actually Uranus, representing the distance of possibility and the far-reaching consequences of one’s actions. So, sometimes, there is a Mercurial flavor to the Fool…but not always. I don’t see this card as the Tarot representation of Mercury, but as leading us to that representation. There’s more.

And sure enough, the very next card after the Zero of the Fool is the One of the Mage, he whose raised finger and focused wand says “I Am”, he who chooses what he shall do, and he who may change reality in accordance with his Will. The Sun is Being, the rising sign is Expression, the Fool is possibility, and Mercury is Communication–and all three of these entities combine in the energy and power of the Mage, who, in the Fool’s Journey, represents self-awareness and claiming of one’s personal Power. He gazes serenely into the future, holding his tools of possibility, grounded in his intention, and fully self-aware that his number, one, is the beginning of Being, his own Being. So it does not surprise me that the astrological sign on the Mage in Haindl’s deck is, indeed, Mercury.

Combine one’s essential personality, the Sun, with one’s choice of self-expression, Mercury, and one’s creation of one’s personal reality, the Rising Sign, and one is looking at the Mage, whose keyword is “I Am, I Said” and who will Be, Do, and Become, what he Will. Male or Female, old or young, right-brain or left-brain, makes no difference to the essential need of all humans to Be, to Become, and to choose their own way of Being. And Mercury and the Sun together. both in astrology and the tarot, produce the energy of the self-aware. focused, and personally empowered Being, who is as s/he chooses to be. And that, my friends, includes every one of us, doesn’t it?

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Wednesday’s Mystery Card Revealed

RWS_Tarot_14_TemperanceDeviantMoonTemperance

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So did you guess correctly that Wednesday's mystery card was Temperance from the Rider-Waite Tarot? what do you know about this card? When you get it in a reading, how do you generally interpret it?

ViscontiSforzaTemperance Did you know that the Visconti-Sforza Temperance did not have wings? I think that her hair gives the idea of wings. Do you agree? Did you notice that she doesn't have anything flowing from her jugs? You are just left to imagine that she is transferring something. The colors are reflected in the Rider-Waite. Her red arms become the angel's red wings.  Her blonde hair is the same only shorter. Her feet don't touch water and earth like the Rider-Waite Temperance, but both have mountains in the background.

Another bit of trivia about this card is that  it is thought that this card was done by someone other than the artist who did the majority of this deck. Why it is a different artist seems to remain a mystery though.

 

Patrick Valenza takes a unique look at Temperance in his Deviant Moon Tarot pictured above. His moon-faced winged woman is a far cry from what I imagine Plato thought of when he offered up his virtues. Did you know that some people refer to Temperance as Restraint? How does that change your own opinion of this card? Do you already read that as part of the card's meanings?

The curious face of this Temperance draws me in. Is the hidden face of the moon peeking out the one we need to focus on? When you compare it to the sweet and simple angel of the Tell-Me Tarot, do you get different meanings or not? Something else to review is which hand is up and which is down?  Below are the Temperance card from the Tell-Me Tarot and from the Archeon Tarot. What are some things that you see in all of these cards? What is missing from the original Rider-Waite in these others (or re-interpreted) that you notice?

TellMeTemperanceArcheron_Temperance



 

What is a Temperance card that you love? Is it one of these or does another one catch your fancy? Think about the colors as well as the vessels in use. What are they pouring? Is it tangible or not tangible? What does that mean to you?

 Looking forward to talking about Temperance…in moderation of course.

 

 

And, just for fun, here's Angel from Buffy the Vampire Slayer. He's Temperance in that unpublished Tarot deck from Rachel Pollack and Paul Lee.

Temperance_BtVS 

What Card Is This?

Riddle me this.

 

Mysterycard2What card is this from?  

What card has the meaning of :

  • Feeling Secure
  • Cardinal Virtue
  • Jungian unconscious
  • Unification
  • Compromise

Here's another clue for you.Mysterycard1 

Feel free to leave your guesses in the comments. We will reveal this mystery card in Friday's post.

 © November 2010 U.S. Games Systems Inc.

The Empress’ Harvest Wheat Bread Recipe

What better time than the present to pull out the Empress Card, and with it, the fabulous recipe for Harvest Wheat Bread from Corinne Kenner's Epicurean Tarot.

 

EpicureanEmpress

 

 

The Empress’ Harvest Wheat Bread

 

1 package active dry yeast

1/3 cup dry milk

2 teaspoons salt

2 tablespoons honey

2-3 cups unbleached all-purpose four

2 cups warm (110° F) water

2 tablespoons softened butter

1/2 cup molasses

1/4 cup cracked wheat

3 cups whole-wheat flour

 

Dissolve yeast in 2 tablespoons of the warm water. Add milk, salt, honey, and 2 cups of all-purpose flour. Add the water, butter, and molasses. Stir vigorously.

 

Add the cracked wheat and whole-wheat flour to form a soft dough. Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth. (Use additional flour as needed to make the dough manageable.)

 

Lightly oil a large bowl, and roll the dough in it to coat it with the oil. Cover the bowl loosely with a kitchen towel and let the dough rise until it doubles in size (about an hour).

Punch the dough down and let it rest 10 to 15 minutes.

 

Shape the dough into two loaves and let them rise until they double in size (about 45 minutes). Place in lightly oiled pans.

 

Place in preheated 375° F oven for 35 to 40 minutes. Remove the loaves from the pans immediately. Let cool before slicing.

 

Enjoy!

EpicureanRecipeBACK
 

Celebrate Abundance

Images The start of November has me thinking about the celebrations ahead; the gathering of loved ones to express thanks for the bounty of blessings in our lives. 

 

When I think about 'abundance' the tarot card that comes to mind first is the Three of Cups, with its joyful dancers with glasses raised. Near their feet, we see a spray of vegetation with pumpkins and grape vines. 

 In her book Introduction to Tarot Susan Levitt points out that "The pumpkin in the foreground indicates a spiritual harvest, or that emotions will be jubilant come autumn."

A similar interpretation is given Hajo Banzhaf's book Tarot for Everyone, "The Three of Cups indicates that a matter will develop favorably. It depicts a harvest festival and means that something reached a good end, the harvest was brought in and we can be thankful, happy, and satisfied with it."  

Of course, in the Crowley Thoth deck, the Three of Cups bears the key word ABUNDANCE. 

In the coming weeks, I look forward to having you gather here to share your stories of celebration. What are you most grateful for? How do you express it? 

Blessings to all!


 


 




Tarot Archetypes The Fool (and a Giveaway!)

T Det Fool 3 I'm pleased to introduce another feature at the Fool Stop Tarot Blog, and I think this one will prove as informative as it is fun: Tarot Archetypes!

Beginning with The Fool, Trump 0, and working through the entire Tarot, I invite you to brainstorm with me–posting all the permutations of a particular card's archetype. (Although some people feel that only Trumps 0-21 portray archetypes, I feel that the entire 78 cards of the Tarot depict familiar universal patterns.)

What is an Archetype? An Archetype is a template or original pattern from which copies are made. Psychologist Carl Jung, author Joseph Campbell, storyteller/author Clarissa Pinkola Estes, psychologist Jean Shinonda-Bolen and others are among those that have brought the concept of Archetypes into our consciousness.

T Det Fool 4 To break it down in practical, every day terms, Archetypes are patterns that are universally recognized. We see Archetypes in myths, fairy tales, literature, and movies. Sometimes, an Archetype plays out right before our very eyes, as in the case of the Twin Towers (The Tower card) or across the big screen (Wall Street, the King of Pentacles card) or in sacred texts (Jesus and Odin, the Hanged Man card).

The Tarot is replete with Archetypes, which no doubt contributes to its lasting intrigue and appeal.

Some Archetypes we find in the Tarot include Soldier, Teacher, Mother, Father, Death, Queen, Thief, Magician, Rebel, Wise Woman, Justice, Resurrection, Lovers, Hermit, Clown, Priest, Bully, Rescuer, Hopeless Romantic, Amazon/Wonder Woman and many others.

In fact, as you can see, some Archetypes share names with Tarot cards!

So our first Tarot Archetype is The Fool. What TV roles, book characters, archetypal patterns, songs, historical figures/events, news items and so on reflect The Fool, in your opinion?

T Det Fool 2 Here are a few of my archetypal associations for The Fool:

General Archetypes: Clown; Jester; Puer Eternis; Wise Fool; Divine Child; Simpleton; Madman; Wanderer

Pop Culture: Pee Wee Herman; Dory in Finding Nemo; Grizzly Man (documentary); Peter Pan; Mork (from Mork and Mindy); Roscoe P. Coltrane (Dukes of Hazzard); What a Wonderful World (song by Louis Armstrong); Jump (song by Van Halen)

So, what are your associations for The Fool? Try not to repeat another's comments if you can! I think this could be an illuminating and informative exercise for us all!

EDIT: Here's the ongoing list of Fool Archetypes and roles; keep 'em coming, everyone, and I'll post yours!

Gilligan (TV show Gilligan's Island) – Kris
Stan Laurel (Laurel and Hardy) – Kris
Susan (from Desperately Seeking Susan TV show) – Prince Lenormand
Yes Man (Movie: Jim Carrey's character) – Dichiaroluna
Alfred E. Newman (Mad Magazine) – Elarbolcelta1967
SpongeBob Squarepants – mdtarot
Teenagers -  Audra
Robin William's character in the movie Toys – Deborah Outland
Marley the dog in the movie Marley and Me – Joanne
Toddlers – Silverlotus
Cameron from Modern Family (TV Show) – Greendaygal540
Fry from Futurama (TV show) – Stephanie
Uncle Fester from The Addams Family (TV show) – Stephanie
Forrest Gump (movie characer) – C.M. Padget
Lucille Ball – Debbie Herbert
Foster Brooks – Debbie Herbert
Baby Bear from the Berenstein Bears – Debbie Herbert

Oh, and did I tell you this will be a giveaway post?

Yep, it's that time again, dear readers. Woohoo!

Every comment you make to this particular post (Tarot Archetypes The Fool) equals an entry to win–drumroll–Kris Waldherr's new Ask the Queens Advice Card Deck! The only caveat is that your posts need to be thoughtful (not merely an "I agree" post)–but you may post as many associations as you'd like when they pop into your head.

The giveaway contest ends next Tuesday, September 21, 2010 at 11 PM EST. Every comment made before then will be entered into the random drawing to win the Ask the Queens Advice Card Deck. But even if the deadline passes, feel free to keep posting your archetypal associations for The Fool!

Good luck!

Top card from the Whimsical Tarot ISBN 978-1-57281-253-6

Middle card from the Halloween Tarot ISBN 0-88079-965-X

Bottom card from the Vanessa Tarot ISBN 1-57281-574-4

Janet, Social Media Maven for U.S. Games Systems, Inc.