U.S. Games Systems, Inc   Tarot & Inspiration

Tarot & Inspiration

 per page
Connolly Tarot
Connolly Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT CONNOLLY TAROT:

Aside from the positive viewpoint of the cards the colors are beautiful and are great for meditation. In fact, there is an extra card showing a doorway called the doorway to meditation. For anyone with a lively colorful and positive outlook then I think these cards will speak to you. They are not too far different from the standard packs, that a beginner wouldn't be able to decipher them yet they are easier to interpret generally as the images are easier to relate to. I've only had the pack 2 days and I am in love with it and feel that this will remain one of my favorites.

-- Heather Wagstaff, on Aeclectic Tarot


Connolly has made major changes to the symbolism of this deck, though she did seem to try to convey the Waite-Smith or "Traditional" meanings in her deck. If you can read with the Waite-Smith deck, you should have little difficulty reading with this one. The suit of Swords has been toned down. There is no bloodshed or violence to women depicted anywhere in this deck. The art is very good. The colors are bright and vibrant and there is lots of detail.

-- Michele Jackson, on Tarot Passages


The Connolly Tarot, created by mom Eileen Connolly and illustrated by son Peter Paul Connolly is a wonderful visually pleasing deck, reminiscent of medieval stained glass often associated with majestic cathedrals found all over Europe.

Peter Connolly has created stunning imagery using colored pencils and rich colors, making this a truly stunning deck. The images follow the Rider Waite symbolism and are easy to follow, making it a great deck for beginners and intermediate readers and has a great positive feel to it. The cards are laminated lightly and the design on the backs makes it able to be read upright or reversed.

The Minor Arcana are just as beautiful and detailed as the Majors and each have Roman numerals at the top of each card. There are a lot of chubby little cherubs in this deck, which adds a sense of charm and spirituality that runs through both Major and Minor Arcana. I just love the colors, they are striking and the symbolism is gentle and easy to interpret. This would be a great deck for any collection.

-- Liz Christy, on Lizzie's Logic

$21.95
Halloween Tarot Deck/Book Set
Halloween Tarot Deck/Book Set

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE HALLOWEEN TAROT DECK/BOOK SET:

I LOVE Halloween and after considering this deck for several years, finding myself in a more-than-usual Halloweeny mood this year, decided to get it. I couldn't have made a better decision. This deck and I 'bonded' almost instantly. I find the cards really just opening up information and ideas to me in a way I'm really not used to with my past tarot practice. ("so THIS is what it's supposed to be like!")

Though it's drawn in a cartoon-like style, and the themes are fun (what's not to love about Halloween?) it's far from shallow! I've never owned the actual RWS deck, but I'm familiar with the 'traditional imagery.' This deck is also based on that traditional imagery, so it's not like it's so far out in left field that you have no basis to work from in reading the cards. But of course, you don't have to be familiar with RWS for this deck to be useful, either.

As a bonus, the added twist of the Halloween theme just adds more layers to it to explore. I initially thought swapping the traditional suits of Coins (or Pentacles), Swords, Wands and Cups for Pumpkins, Bats, Imps and Ghosts would just be kind of silly. Nope -- it works! It makes perfect sense when working with this deck. Sometimes, to me, more sense than the 'traditional' suits. It just seems to give me more information to work with. I've been using this deck for several days, and I've done more readings in that time than I have in the last several months -- particularly because I so enjoy working with it, and the information I am getting is so instant, spot-on, useful, intriguing, and just plain fun.

The accompanying book is very nice. Though I'm focusing on developing a more intuitive tarot practice, I still like to have the book handy for some guidance as to what the deck author had in mind, if I get really stuck (though I only use it when I'm stuck). When I first got my deck, the first thing I did was sit down and go through all the cards one at a time, without looking at the book, just to get my own intuitive feel for them. After spending a day or so on that, I read the book cover to cover, just to get an overview. The chapters on the history of Halloween are a lot of fun, and each card's description is succinct and to the point. It gives a nice background, and pointed out a few things I might not have thought of on my own, to store in the back of my mind; my theory being, they'll pop up in the future if I need that information for a particular reading.

So ... everyone is different, and decks some people love do nothing for someone else. But for me, this deck has been awesome, actually exceeding my expectations. If you love Halloween, definitely try this deck. It's not only a lot of fun, but has some rich and thought-provoking imagery, and is well worth exploring.

-- Karen Hall, on Amazon


I first saw this set sometime last year. A friend of mine owned it and I looked through it and smiled the whole way through. It's very innocent and sweet, bringing a playfulness to the spirit of Halloween that you don't really see anymore. The deck is very detailed with all 78 cards included. The book outlines each and every card, and gives a brief but very entertaining and detailed history about the traditions and origins of Halloween -- very comprehensive. This deck and its book have been a joy and makes learning the Tarot very fun for me. I recommend it to anyone who likes a little holiday in their spiritual step!

-- Angela Gregory, on Amazon

$31.95
The New Palladini Tarot
The New Palladini Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW PALLADINI TAROT:

This tarot deck review is about the New Palladini Tarot. One of the best tarot deck in the universe and beyond, (at least in my opinion). When I got the New Palladini Tarot deck from Gateway books and gifts it was love at first sight! I was so certain that this was the deck that I wanted that I did not even bother to look at the rest of the decks lying around on the shelf at the store! I especially like this tarot deck because it has wild and extremely vivid artwork. I think that this deck will appeal to almost anyone. I think it will especially appeal to people with huge and unlimited imaginations. Another reason the New Palladini Tarot deck is so cool is because it is easy to shuffle. The cards are not too big or too small. They are just the right size. That is another reason the New Palladini tarot is a good, fun and exciting tarot deck to use and/or own! The New Palladini tarot deck is also great because when a querent does a reading this deck will put an ear to ear grin on their face. This deck is positive and brings great bliss to whoever uses this tarot deck. It is a good deck because it is an easy deck to use. Even third day tarot readers can read accurately with the New Palladini tarot deck. That is a very good reason, don't you think so? Well, that was my review on the New palladini tarot deck. I hope you liked it.

-- Robert, Aeclectic Tarot


The New Palladini Tarot, created and illustrated by David Palladini, is one that has been on my wish list for a long while. I had looked at some of the cards online when I was able, and felt drawn to the art and style of the deck. Having the Aquarian Tarot in my collection also, I was intrigued by the New Palladini in its richness of color and detail, as compared to the Aquarian Tarot, which is still quite lovely and has worked well for me over the years. This is your standard tarot deck in that it is a full 78 cards (22 Major Arcana, 56 Minor Arcana in suits of Cups, Swords, Pentacles, Rods). Much of the symbolism is based on RWS imagery, but with a new interesting interpretation. The Fool for instance is a bit different, with a young bearded fellow in blue/green tunic and turban carrying a rod and a white rose in the other hand. We can see that he is cliffside. We cannot see the little white dog usually nipping at his heels, and the Fool seems to be facing towards the right instead of left. But I like this card, nevertheless.

The strength of this deck lies in cards such as The Emperor, The Chariot, and Death among others. The Strength card, always one of my favorites, is quite nice. The lion seems to be apart of the maidens dress almost, which I think is a great illustration of the lion as being a part of the maiden (her emotions, impulses, and animal instincts) and she gently reigns the lion in. The Empress is the guardian of bounty with corn growing around her, waterfall spilling behind her, her glowing shield of Venus and crown of stars show her power. I've also enjoyed many of the unique elements this deck had to offer. The backgrounds of many cards are a nighttime sky instead of daytime. The King and Queen of Pentacles are simply sillouetted, with a pentacle in their heads, thats definantly something Ive never seen before. None of the suits seem to have a specific color designation, however many of the characters in the Wands are adorned in greens and golds, the Swords, mostly blueish-purples, but there are many colors throughout, which I am happy for being a reader that responds strongly to color symbolism within the tarot.

The only issues I have had with this deck so far are more my own prejudices anyway (such as the Judgement card being renamed the Last Judgement). But overall, this is one that I think will be on my top ten list of decks for years to come, and I highly recommed this one. I think it is appropriate for beginners as well as intermediate/advanced readers. The symbols are drawn clearly and simply and all evoke the meaning they are meant to. The size is about perfect, easy shuffling. If you are into reading with reversals, the back picture of two snakes swallowing their tails in the pattern of a figure eight, works for that purpose. I hope if you choose this deck, that it guide and delight you the way it has me, and that it becomes a trusted friend for your collection and reading pleasure. Enjoy, it's a keeper.

-- Eala, Aeclectic Tarot


After many years of not buying any decks, of not even looking at other decks, I recently bought The New Palladini Tarot. I like it. It's a RWS clone. For the most part such decks don't so much reinterpret the standard, or revise it, as they do add a new coat of paint to it. It always seemed to me that there ought to be a better reason than mere caprice to change what is well-loved and working fine. But maybe there needn't be a better reason. I tried the deck as soon as it arrived, laying out some cards, looking for general guidance, seeing what the images suggested. Over the next few days, I did readings, and laid down mandalas. The deck, while new, really, in only a cosmetic sense, did suggest new insights into certain cards. This always excites me, those moments -- for me infrequent -- when new understanding slides into consciousness like something warm and buttery. I've always felt like tarot's equivalent of a person who moves his lips while reading, but these insights always inspire a new confidence. Should the deck itself take all the credit? No, probably not. Probably, any new understanding grows as much from the newness of the images, from the friction of the new against the expected, as from the artist's efforts. But Palladini's images are pleasing to the eye, the are bright, the are detailed, and so they command scrutiny. Palladini favors medium- and close-ups of human figures in most of the cards. One big difference between this deck and the RWS is that the human figures on the cards are much more individualized than those in the Waite deck. The characters are not interchangeable -- they are distinct from one another; they are particular individuals. For someone who makes the NPT deck his or her primary one, this kind of uniqueness among the "players" could, conceivably, allow for a different sort of intimacy with that deck, one that goes beyond reading to meditation, visualization, pathworking, and so forth.

In the booklet that comes with the deck, the artist says that he has tried to represent all races in the cards. There are compelling reasons for this kind of inclusiveness -- after all, if as some writers aver the deck is a book of archetypes, then not to represent as many of the world's cultures as possible would be misleading. The author has drawn not only from various ethnic cultures, but from different time periods, as well. Figures are costumed in ancient Egyptian garb, medieval, renaissance, and modern costumes. The periods and costumes vary from card to card, determined, I guess, by the author's interpretation of that card.

Palladini's earlier tarot deck, The Aquarian Tarot, used muted colors. It relied on more earthy tones, with occasional colorful highlights, and to me conveyed a flavor of the Jazz Age. The NPT deck's color is bold and energetic, more striking than what you get in the RWS deck, and the range of colors used is much wider than that used in the earlier deck, and in the RWS deck itself.

Some of the changes Palladini makes are curious, while others are very precise and help clarify the cards' meaning for me. The Devil card, for instance, is dramatic, and its devil especially horrible, bearing no resemblance to the Devil of the RWS deck. The symbolism of the old card has been distilled to a single clear and arguably oversimplified image: the Devil holding a chain, "the great black chain of slavery," the booklet calls it. For me this is a case of less being less, not more. In Waite's deck, the image revealed the materiality of the card, and the willingness of the bondage much more precisely. The chains around the man and woman's necks were loose; they could remove them whenever they chose. The Waite card emphasized choice, and therefore wonderfully and corruptly echoed The Lovers, both in its meaning and its image. The Saturnian quality, too, of the RWS Devil has been all but expunged from the new card-it has been reduced to the blackness of the chain. To a reader who is already comfortable with her repertoire of meanings for the card, this might not make much difference, but for one who relies heavily on intuitive flashes suggested by the images, it might. Nevertheless, it is a compelling card-dramatic and ugly. Aesthetically, I like it.

Trump VIII, however, Strength, is very expressive of that card's qualities. The card shows a woman not taming a lion, but having already tamed it. Its jaws are closed. And the woman's eyes are closed. She has already wreathed the lion in flowers. Her gentle posture and contemplative expression more vividly show that special strength that comes from self-mastery, or spiritual power, or whatever you care to call it: It's gentle, silent, irresistible, and you see it clearly in the card, much more so, I think, than in the RWS deck (or the Thoth, deck, for that matter).

The booklet that comes with the deck is standard stuff -- just enough to get a novice started. It contains a helpful gloss of some of the basic symbolism found in the cards. There may not be anything quite stunning about this deck, but, then, why must there be? There are probably only so many ways to decorate a thing, and at some point change and razzmatazz will become fulsome. In many cases, they have. If tarot is a living art, its life comes from what the users bring to it, from the changes wrought by their experiences and insights, not from the song-and-dance of new ideologies, or any other fanciful newness borne of a misguided notion that we need something new, anything, just so it's new. The New Palladini Tarot deck is simple and good; Palladini does it well. And if this is just a simple, colorful deck, fine. That's all it needs to be.

-- Mitras, Tarot Tripod


This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made This deck is by the artist who drew the Aquarian Tarot deck, which despite its age is still selling briskly. The New Palladini is similar in style to the Aquarian, you can recognize the style of the faces and the artist’s penchant for a large centralized figure in most scenes, though not to the extent we saw in the Aquarian. It was drawn using, pencils, ink and magic markers. Palladini has included much more detail in this deck and has reduced his reliance on pastel shades in favor of bolder colors. There has also been an effort made to include some other cultures in this deck. The Fool for example, is bearded and wears a turban, giving him a somewhat Arab look, The Chariot driver is wearing an Egyptian headdress and has the long thin beard often seen in Egyptian art and Strength portrays a woman who appears to be from India; she has the mark of her caste on her forehead. While Palladini stamped his own style on the deck, it is for the most part, a Waite-Smith clone and readers familiar with the Waite-Smith or the Aquarian should have no trouble reading this deck. Some slight changes were made to the symbolism. The Wheel of Fortune no longer has the familiar four elemental symbols in each corner, rather the elements are depicted in the center of the wheel. The Angel of Temperance is shown in profile, and you only see the upper half of the body, so you can’t determine if the one foot is in the water. The Woman in The Star is submerged in the water to her hips, vice kneeling beside it, and she has two cups -- one submerged and one above the water. There are no dogs in The Moon and no people in The Sun, or Judgment. These are minor changes though and should only be a problem for those who prefer traditional symbolism on their decks. The suits are the traditional Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles and the Court Cards are King, Queen, Knight and Page. Again, Palladini does not stray too far from Waite-Smith in the scenes on his Minor Arcana. He seemed to run out of steam on the 6 and 7 of cups however, the 6 shows 6 cups filled with flowers (no people) and the 7 shows 7 cups "Filled with images of fantasy" -- again, no people. These two cards look more like they belong in a deck with unillustrated minors. On the other hand, some of the cards have unique touches. The King and Queen of Pentacles for example, are silhouettes filled in with a star filled night sky. Many of the cards have delightfully different details, which make the deck a pleasure to peruse at length. The booklet that accompanies the deck is fairly decent, with a description of the symbolism used on each card and short upright and reversed interpretations for each card. Overall this deck is very nice. It would work well as a first Tarot deck or make an nice alternative to the standard Waite-Smith or Aquarian.

-- Michele Jackson, Tarot Passages

$21.95
Soul Cards Deck
Soul Cards Deck

What customers are saying about SoulCards

“Mysterious and revealing…these images help us to understand our own souls.”

—Isabel Allende, author of The House of Spirits


“Intensely soulful, original, and penetrating.”

—Clarissa Pinkola, author of Women Who Run with Wolves


“Deborah has created superb images to touch and embolden your own imagination.”

—David Whyte, author of Crossing the Unknown Sea


Done with beautiful colors you will find that there are no right and wrong answers for these cards. They are remarkable. There isn't a book that tells you what each image means, instead the pictures speak to you as the reader. These cards are great for readings.

The use of colors and the images themselves tell you what you need to know. As you can see in the images, you notice the colors and then the people and how they must feel or their thoughts. There are 60 cards in each Soul cards deck. They can be used separately or together to make the deck itself 120 cards.

There are subtle symbols in the cards themselves. One only has to look to see them. Again, these cards are a must for beginners and professionals.

Soul Cards 1: These powerfully evocative images to stimulate personal insight, creativity, inter-relational conversation and more. They speak directly to your soul. The only thing that accompanies these cards is a little booklet that suggests creative ways to deepen your experience of the cards and foster personal insight.

Deidrul, Aeclectic Tarot 

$24.95
Sacred Rose Tarot Deck
Sacred Rose Tarot Deck

What customers are saying about The Sacred Rose Tarot

My impression of this deck is that if you were looking for power, you would find it here. Every person should be able to experience the wisdom held within these cards. Were I to offer my client a choice of decks (which I do), I think this deck would appeal to those who working towards personal empowerment.

There are many cards in this deck that I am drawn to. The Ten of Wands would certainly be one of them. We are used to the traditional image of an upright figure attempting to carry the ten wands. Here we see a figure on his back, hand pushing away the wands that are coming down on him. How many of us have not felt imprisoned by our responsibilities, to the point that we felt we were being attacked by them!

The Ace of Wands attracted my attention for another reason. The traditional hand with the wand in it is not coming from a cloud, but from the center of a red rose. What intense power we see manifested here!

The card of Death can be a difficult card for any deck. In the Sacred Rose Tarot, Johanna has cloaked the figure of death in a deep purple robe - the color of spirit. He still carries a scythe, but you get a bit of a different perception of him. Unlike traditional decks, where Death looks straight out at you, this figure is seen in silhouette, facing the past.

Then we have the Knight of Swords. Facing the reader, very intent and focused on the present, this Knight carries a sword in his left hand, moving forward through the fog with a look of intense concentration and determination on his face. The coloring for this card is dark purple and black.

This last card is a favorite of mine in many decks, and that is the Magician. Here we see a figure, dressed in red, with his arms upraised. Above his head we see a glowing Lemnescate. His body seems to float in space, with the symbols of the four elements surrounding him in glowing gold. An excellent portrayal of the will and absolute power that the Magician represents.

This is a deck that can be used by anyone, and can be used in many ways: in readings, in meditation, and in ritual, to name a few. This is a deck that a reader of any level could relate to and understand. It carries the gift of opening up the mind to accepting the archetypal wisdom that the Tarot personifies. This deck will take you out of who you are and point you into new directions!

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


Back in the 1970s, when I first became involved with the tarot, I remember being very disappointed with the cards available at that time. Then along came the Sacred Rose. For the first time, here was imagery that was bright, clear in meaning, reflective and yet also very much alive. I never really took the tarot seriously until I encountered this deck, and even now, with many other fine and innovative decks having appeared on the scene, this is still the deck I consider the best. The images are reminiscent of stained glass, but really evoke an entirely different feeling than other decks. Rather than telling you what the cards mean, it seems as though the images draw their meanings out from the inside. In addition, there is none of the formal stodginess of traditional decks; you can almost smell the woods and flowers that illuminate the borders, and feel the forces the cards represent, something like looking toward the stars on a cold, clear night. If this all sounds a bit romantic, it is because the images are themselves romantic, and that kind of interaction is what successful use of the tarot is all about. This is a good deck for beginners as well as experienced readers, and is capable of producing readings from the mundane to the deepest of spiritual encounters. Highly recommended; don't leave your astral home without it.

—David Albert, Amazon customer


The Sacred Rose Tarot Deck by Johanna Gargiulo-Sherman is one of my favorite decks. Her use of imagery to convey the symbolic meanings of each of the cards is not only thoughtfully rendered, but is easy to understand and learn even for beginning tarot card readers. I love her use of color and shape to energize and give fluidity to the compositional elements of each card. Even though this deck was published in the 80's the cards are as relevant and powerful today as they were in its first introduction. A great deck for both collectors and mystics.

—Pamela Wells, Amazon customer

$21.95
Tarot Deck/Book Set for Dummies® Tarot for the Rest of Us!™
Tarot Deck/Book Set for Dummies® Tarot for the Rest of Us!™

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TAROT DECK/BOOK SET FOR DUMMIES:

"For someone who is curious about the Tarot this is a great introductory book packed with educational and informative information that can provide a solid foundation from which to build upon."

-- Sheila Hall, CTC

$31.95
Paulina Tarot
Paulina Tarot

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT PAULINA TAROT:

The artwork (done with watercolors) is very much along the lines of whimsy and fantasy. The colors are muted pastels, more towards browns, grays, yellows and greens, with the occasional red and orange. The imagery in the cards is a combination of the traditional imagery seen in the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot, and the creatures of spirit that wanted to be included in the cards (this from the author). I did find that each time I looked at a card, I saw something new and interesting. My thought with this deck is that what needs to be seen will be seen each time the cards are read.

I found that the imagery in this deck simply pulled me in! Very delicately done, following tradition, with the addition of many whimsical elements. Each card adds to a wonderful fantasy world, replete with faeries, forests, plants and animals, and unique symbols in the background. This is a deck that could be used under any circumstances, even when reading for children. It would be an excellent addition to any Tarot deck collection.

-- Bonnie Cehovet, Certified Tarot Grand Master


Paulina Cassidy has created this delicate and romantic seventy-eight tarot deck with instruction book (LWB). The cards are definitely packed with detail. It is charming, has a Victorian flair, with a hint of New Orleans, Mardi Gras. Many of the characters in her art have a porcelain doll-like quality and are wearing Victorian period clothing.

The deck contains much of the Rider-Waite-Smith symbolism, as that was her earliest tarot influence. Paulina’s chosen modality for this deck is watercolor. The artwork is done in soft, muted shades.

Using this deck gives one the feeling of stepping back into a time of whimsy and magic. It takes you to a place where Dragons and Pegasus fly and many other magical creatures live side by side, comfortably with humans. Paulina mentions in the little white book, that she knows that these creatures exist even though they cannot be seen by the naked eye. You will also note many birds, butterflies, dragonflies, all in magical forest and woodland settings.

This deck would be a nice fit for beginners as well as for the professional reader (especially anyone who may doing readings at a venue with a theme, such as a Mardi Gras party). The deck is also suitable for all ages. It will be enjoyed by anyone who is interested in a Rider-Waite-Smith type deck, but looking for something a little more whimsical.

-- Terri Clement, ATA


The Paulina Tarot is absolutely gorgeous! The cards are an average sized US Games deck, both same in height and width as popular decks like the Fantastical Creatures and Fenestra Tarots. The box is a bit deeper, however, allowing more room for a nicer printed LWB. The cards are neither a high gloss nor a dull matte, but a pleasant "in between" that allows the colours to pop, but not to shine and reflect other lights.

The colour scheme of the deck is what I would refer to as a rich watercolour. Soft in some places and a few tones deeper in others. This is not what one would consider a jewel toned deck, for it has a much earthier appeal to it. This deck nicely reflects the seasons, especially spring and summer. Wildflowers, birds and bees abound, with other creatures both familiar and unfamiliar. Fae-like characters dwell in this enchanted realm and the artist brings us directly into the mysterious hidden world of the garden, field and forest. Drawing on inspirations like New Orlean's Victorian-Era Mardi Gras and the pages of fairytale books, these creatures are donned in whimsical costumes, masques, stars and bells. The artwork is incredibly intricate and detailed and it takes a lot of time to discover the many hidden enchantments on each card. Expect the unexpected!

The entire deck follows the RWS traditional meanings with an exquisite approach, making it highly readable, but the elaborate artwork allows for much development on the intuitive side. The cards have a small white border with the titles written at the bottom, so nothing is lost from the images themselves. Unique, exquisite, charming and thoughtful, the Paulina Tarot is a treat for both readers and collectors, alike!

-- Hearth Cricket, Aeclectic Tarot


Sprightly delicate creatures dance upon branches, while festooned women celebrate around an unusual tree sprouting geometric boxes. Animals from both this earth and an otherworldly one dot the enchanting landscape of the Paulina Tarot as do characters bedecked with colorful early Mardi Gras, Victorian-influenced costumes.

Reflecting artist Paulina Cassidy’s affinity for the city of New Orleans, the Paulina Tarot reflects Rider-Waite-Smith structure, yet imparts a fresh, lighthearted perspective to the cards.

Delightfully detailed and gracefully rendered, the artistry of this deck invites users to come along for a magical ride that, while whimsical, captures the everyday situations, emotions and dilemmas faced in the ordinary world.

I've found the Paulina Tarot to be a playful deck, while still speaking to the inner world (and issues) that often brings us to do readings in the first place (especially when it comes to reminding me not to work so hard and expect so much of myself!).

I love working with the Paulina Tarot especially for personal readings and journaling! With intricate line work, fanciful characters, and muted watercolors, this deck pleases the eye and lifts the spirits. But, truly, it's not just a "pretty" deck; the Paulina deck imparts illuminating wisdom, emotional comfort and pointed answers for those who go beyond its lovely surface.

-- Janet Boyer, The Tarot Channel


This deck is full of stunning detail with black outlines and dreamy water coloured pallet. Even though the art is done this way it is not at all washed out and it is full of vibrant colour. The back features two birds on a cream background, which is classic and feminine.

It showcases many little creatures of the night, quiet gothic looking people and central figures, fae, fairy tale characters and pretty much anything else from a gifted imagination. This deck has a gothic like theme, which will definitely find an audience with young adults, as it is still quiet romantic and not too dark. It has some splashes of Tim Burton and Dr Seuss hidden within her artwork, but it does not take away from her creation at all.

The artist and author of the booklet actually set out to create a Tarot Deck allowing the symbolism to draw her in, this incredibly detailed piece of work took her over a year and a half to complete.

The Paulina Tarot is elegant, detailed and full of stunning imaginative artwork and I highly recommend it.

-- Ethony Tarot Blogspot


The Paulina Tarot was created by Paulina Cassidy, a talented artist who created these cards based on her own personal imagery and vision. This deck does not contain traditional imagery, though the basic narratives of most of the cards are similar to the Rider-Waite deck but Cassidy adds her own elements, such as a frequent use of keys, eggs, and flowing, natural imagery like branches and stars. The overall feeling is one of whimsy and play, but there is much more to this deck than it might seem at first.

These images contain levels of mystery and darkness, which doesn’t come through immediately or if you just look at a few images. For example, here is the High Priestess, my go-to card when I buy a new deck:

Note here the ways that this card is traditional (the pomegranate, the moon, the idea of a veil or curtain), but look at what Cassidy adds here -- with her High Priestess, the veil is actually within the priestesses body. When the veil is peeled back, you don’t get her body, but eyes in darkness, a scroll, and the pomegranate. By putting these “mysteries” inside her body, Cassidy deepens the symbolism here -- this high priestess embodies mystery in a very physical way in this card, not just as a static figure but in her body as well as in the things she carries.

In this deck, unlike many I’ve seen, Cassidy does a fantastic job with the Court Cards, which are not only hard to read sometimes, but also hard to give personality. Like the Major Arcana, the court cards can seem a bit static–they don’t really have a story and represent types of people or emotional states. Cassidy, though, makes each court card unique and fills them with personality and intent. Just take a look at the Knight of Swords, who just screams craftiness, intelligence, and danger.

Overall, this deck is lovely, layered, and contains surprising depth which might not be evident if you focus on the swirling, playful surface. I highly recommend this beautiful deck.

-- Letitia, IntegrativeTarot.com


Where can I start? I have been watching this Tarot develop on the artist’s website for the past few years. Now I hold the finished product in my hand. This is a masterpiece as far as Tarot decks go. It takes the traditional images to a new and very, very, detailed level that should your tastes favor this interpretation, you will find a new favorite.

In the endless Rider Waite clones that get stamped out each year, Paulina Tarot rises above the herd. I generally prefer a very boldly colored deck for easier interpretation. It is true, the colors are subtle and easy on the eye. Yet, they are no less vivid. I adore the delicate lines and layers of every card. This is not my first deck, and will not be my last. I collect decks, most are locked away as art decks. This one is very useable as well as aesthetically pleasing. Your clients get a visual treat, as well as very accurate advice.

Whimsical, dreamy and nostalgic, I cannot stop singing the praises of this labor of love. I followed Paulina's plight in New Orleans, after Hurricane Katrina. Indeed, the frailty of life is reflected in this deck. It will remain near & dear to my heart! If you feel there are too many decks published annually, treat yourself to this one. It is the new pinnacle as far as other Tarots are concerned. Good luck topping this one.

-- Richard K. Kostoff, Amazon customer


The Paulina Tarot is a unique and charming approach to Tarot imagery, with a slyly engaging spin on the cards that visually and thematically owes very little to either the RWS or Crowley canon. Cassidy sinks her taproot into the eerie and lovely realm of the Fey for her creation.

The art reminds one of the elegant "arty" illustrations from the sixties, albeit with a sharply sweet kick. There is also something of the fairy illustrations of the nineteenth century in the endless cascade of detail on each card, which draws one in. Every time one looks at a card one sees something new. A faintly "gothic fairy" feel to the figures with a lot of winks and nudges makes a reading seem a little like a dialogue with eldritch creatures. Even the minutiae is clever, fresh and witty, and the rich yet subdued palate is seductive. There are lots of odd creatures skittering through the cards, all of them engaging without being cloying, even when they are genuinely spooky.

The deck reads beautifully, enabling one to focus on difficult issues with a gentle touch. While not to every taste, for readings or contemplation the Paulina Tarot can be a delightfully unique and endlessly rewarding ramble through a refreshingly non-saccharine fairyland.

-- Thalassa, Bay Area Tarot Symposium


The Paulina Tarot deck just pulled me to it. The artwork is full of whimsy and soft, soothing colors. Each time I look at the cards I find something I missed the time before. These cards are so easy to read and I'm thrilled to have a deck. I would recommend these to everyone. Readers who are just getting started will find these are a very good beginning deck. Experienced readers will enjoy finding new symbols with each new reading. I love this deck.

-- Vanessa G. Coffey, Amazon customer


The Paulina Tarot is a beautiful tarot deck -- it has a dreamlike quality that really connects with your intuition and spirit. I have had this deck for about a month now, and it is truly one of my favorites in my growing collection. I have used it many times, and get very powerful and accurate sessions. This is one of those rare tarot decks which has not only fabulous art, but also much symbolism and detail that really contribute to strong readings.

I love the Queen of Wands in this deck, especially! What a fabulous conception -- the cat is huge and very mystical looking, next to the queen. The two of pentacles reminds me of one of Chagall's circus riders. The Star is especially lovely too. I love this deck!

-- Ravenna Moon, Naples, Italy, Amazon customer

$21.95
Tea Leaf Fortune Cards
Tea Leaf Fortune Cards

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT TEA LEAF FORTUNE CARDS:

Reading tea leaves – how much more esoteric can one get! One might expect to find this in a quaint little tearoom, or perhaps in a Harry Potter movie, but as an everyday part of life … something that we can all do? Not without years of training, and a very will developed intuition and imagination. In reality, Rae Hepburn did have years of training … from her father, who studied Oriental and Indian metaphysical philosophies. Her father invented games for her when she was a child, games that were based on intuition. One of their favorite games was absorbing energy from another person's aura and interpreting it. Hepburn learned to go with her gut feeling, bypassing the logical processes of the brain.

Hepburn learned tea leaf reading from an Aunt. Hepburn's friends were eager to learn tea leaf reading, and asked her to compile a list of images and their meanings. The list that she compiled was daunting – 500 images, and their associated meanings. Seeing that memorizing this list could be rather over-whelming, Hepburn decided to develop a set of cards that would serve the same purpose as the images in the tea leaves. To make the list more manageable, Hepburn concentrated on the images that appeared most frequently, eliminating the ones that rarely appeared. She also eliminated symbols that duplicated the meaning of another symbol. The cards are round, so that they resemble a teacup. A personal thought here is that round cards can also convey degrees of meaning (as part of a circle of 360 degrees).

The deck and companion book come is s sturdy cardboard box, with a cover that lifts up, but not completely off. There are two sections for the cards, along with a gold bag to place them in so that they can be mixed and drawn for readings.

The 98-page companion book begins with a history of tea and tea leaf reading, then moves into the actual manner in which tea leaves are read from actual tea. I found this to be both complex and fascinating. I also found myself thanking my lucky stars that I was going to be reading from a deck of cards! This section also gives an example of one type of Tea Leaf reading - Reading For The Coming Year.

Three methods are presented for using the Tea Leaf Fortune Cards – (1) The Coming Year, (2) The Coming Week, and (3) Astral House Pyramid. The suggestion is made that the reader use the Coming Year reading first, so that the Seeker's long term energy has time to be absorbed. I am fascinated by this method, as the reader ends up with four cards for each month, which are then interpreted together. One card is drawn for each month, then the cards are remixed, and the next round is drawn. Quite interesting! For the coming week, seven cards are drawn, mixing the cards between draws, with the Seeker concentrating on what is going on in their life. The cards are read as a whole, as a story, rather than as individual days.

The Astral House Pyramid begins with the Seeker picking an Astral House card that represents the area of their life that they want to know more about. Underneath this card are placed three lines of cards – two cards in the first line, three cards in the second line, and four cards in the third line. Each line represents things that could happen within that number of days, weeks or months. Sample readings are presented for each of the three spread types. The imagery in the cards is presented in a very gentle, “Currier & Ives” type manner, circular in nature, to fit in with the card itself. The edges blend into the card, rather than standing out against it. Symbols are diverse, including Angel, Apple, Axe, Bat, Bread, Butterfly, Candle, Claw, Harp, Nest, Older Man, Older Woman, Torch, Wheel and Wreath. I found the depth of symbols to represent life and its issues and situations very well. Anyone, from any background, could read well with these cards. It is a fun system to work with, but it is also accurate. (My readings did reflect what was going on in my life, and my clients’ lives.) Whether reading the cards for pleasure, or looking for specific answers, the Tea Leaf Fortune Cards have wonderful insight to offer!

—Bonnie Cehovet, Aeclectic Tarot


"The drinking of tea and the reading of tea leaves to divine the future are so intertwined that the history of one cannot be told without the other," starts the book that accompanies this unique oracle deck. If you've ever been interested in reading tea leaves but found memorizing the 500+ symbols daunting, this deck has condensed the most frequently found tea leaf symbols and incorporated them into a clever deck that mimics the tea leaf reading experience. With round cards that are designed to represent round teacups (and keywords/phrases to help you springboard into a reading), this pleasant deck will create a unique reading experience with some surprising results.

An actual soft-cover instruction book is included, 98 pages of high quality matte stock paper. This book is a dramatically improved version of the previous book from the first printing, with new pictures of actual tea leaf readings and much more detailed interpretations of the card symbols. The meanings of the cards are expanded in the book, based on traditional tea leaf interpretations that have been passed down through generations.

The most unique trait of this deck is the clever shape of round cards to mimic teacups. The packaging of this deck is gorgeous; I am not sure how something of such quality slipped through at such a low price. There is a *lot* here for the price.

I have had some great fun with this deck. I was originally introduced to it by my own psychic, who gave me a whopper of a reading with it several years ago, sending me on a wild goose chase on the Internet to find one for myself. At the time, the deck was out of print and selling for over a hundred dollars in many forums. What a delight that it is back in print and very affordable. This is a completely unique oracle system, and can be used independently or in conjunction with other oracles such as runes, angel cards, or tarot cards. While it is a friendly deck with some delightful cards, you will also find some difficult cards that mirror many of the tough situations we come to a reading to explore (real life!).

This deck is a bounty, and you get more than what you pay for. I love that there are no borders, and the smaller size of the cards makes them easy to handle. The colors are both rustic (to match the feel of tea leaf history) and bright. From front to back, this deck is an excellent production and very fun to use in readings.

Donnaleigh De LaRose, Divine Whispers

$29.95
OMEGALAND
OMEGALAND

What customers are saying about Omegaland Tarot 

These five stars are not because this is a great Tarot Deck, but because this is a great fun deck. It's like having endless adventures in the grim future if you use it like an old fashioned Pulp Writer's Story Wheel. If you want a deck of cards you can use to prod and prompt your imagination this is the best I have found thus far.

—J.F. Smith-Schroers, Amazon customer


As an owner of 300 tarot decks (yes, each thoughtfully collected), I am pleased to say "Omegaland" is a welcome new addition. The imagery is unique, accessible, thought provoking. I am a fan of post apocalyptic fantasy and this fills the bill. I also appreciate that female images are respectfully portrayed as strong- but not 'manlike'- capable people. I love it!

—Dr. Honeybee, Amazon customer


The Omegaland tarot is an anomalous deck by U. S. Games Systems, Inc. Influenced by the current trend in post-apocalyptic texts, survivalist reality shows, and an epidemic of zombie series such as The Walking Dead, Z Nation, and iZombie, as well as militia culture this unusual deck is set in a lawless society where violence is the rule. It is hard to tell if this deck is a bit tongue-in-cheek or is totally serious, and being marketed to a heretofore untapped demographic – the redneck. Given that this is also a card game that you can play on those cold nights in the bunker complex it may not be entirely humorless. 

So in your a few spare minutes when you aren't out scavenging, looting, or reloading your guns, you grab a bunch of pencils and card 'liberated' from an abandoned school and draw yourself a deck of tarot cards. Your art style is a little rough-hewn, a bit chainsaw art, but your nouvelle redneck compatriots will love your depiction of their crumbling world – Harleys and handguns – this is how you roll. 

This is a 78 card tarot – with 22 Major Arcana and 56 Minor Arcana. In the Major Arcana no Trumps have been renamed, and there are no significant departures from the Rider Waite Smith standard. In the Minor Arcana, Coins have been recast as cans of food, Cups are now water canteens both big and small, Swords have become crossbows, and Wands are now guns. The court cards remain standard – Kings, Queens, Knights, Pages. All cards have both numbers and titles beneath the illustration, in addition the Minor Arcana have a letter and/or number (for the card game) written on a scrap of masking tape in the top left-hand corner. 

The cards measure 72 x 120 mm. The card stock is fairly high quality, solid and inflexible, with a smooth low sheen finish. The deck sits nicely in the hands and shuffles smoothly. The print is crisp and clean, sharp lines, clear colors, no blurring or bleeding of the images. The palette is somewhat military in nature – lots of browns, khaki, olive drab, grey, with occasional splashes of red, orange, pale blue, and grass green. The artists style is blocky and choppy – a studied amateurishness. 

The Little White Book is 52 pages long, with instructions in English only. Using faux-typewriter print, information is given in the first person by your guide through Omegaland. This is an anonymous, masculine voice, full of gruff smarts and survivalist wisdom, that tells it like it is. The divinatory meanings are quite standard, but refreshingly shorn of all esoteric jargon. Each card has a little bit of narrative that explains what is happening in the image, seamlessly melded with interpretations. This is followed by one, or more, keywords that summarize the essence of the card. This is really good information, bluntly put, with no ambiguities. There are no interpretations for reversed cards given. There is a 'Survival Spread' included – a 6-card draw with Location, Food, Weapons, Fuel, Drink, and Stockpile to help the Seeker divine their future. Instructions for the games are provided on a further 12 pages of the LWB and 6 additional cards. There are separate rules for 3 players, for 4-6 players, and free-for-all games. 

This is a truly unusual tarot deck – one of several more masculine decks to appear on the market lately. While much of its symbolism departs radically from more standard images it is still a functional deck. I would not recommend it for beginners, however if you are an experienced tarot reader with an interest in post-apocalyptic landscapes then this may well be the deck for you. 

—MedusaWink, Aeclectic Tarot

$21.95
Angel Inspiration Deck
Angel Inspiration Deck

 

WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE ANGEL INSPIRATION DECK

Beautiful Deck. It doesn't have gold edges nor a huge guide book. I loved it because it was to the point. It is not sugar coated. It is about "Angels" and I did find it inspiring.

Cyn, Amazon customer

$21.95
Blue Bird Lenormand
Blue Bird Lenormand

What customers are saying about Blue Bird Lenormand

The magic in this little deck lies in it's simplicity and its eloquent, Victorian nature. The pictures relay a gentle vibe while the short poems on each card relay a passionate feel for each card. This is the first Lenormand deck that has ever spoke to me card by card. The poems add a refreshing sense of purpose to the cards, without cluttering their meaning. It is, what is sure to be, a time-honored deck.

—Nicole Guillaume, Guiding Echoes


The Blue Bird Lenormand is a charming and classic looking Petit Lenormand fortune telling deck that will be a delight to many. The sky blue tuck box is elegant yet simply done. It is strikingly similar to the Blue Owl Lenormand box.

The artwork is 18th century Victorian era, with playing card inserts in the upper left ¼ of the card. I found this updated Lenormand setup to very similar to the Daveluy deck c. 1860 and the Geuens-Willaert Lenormand c. 1903. The upper right ¼ of each card contains an original verse written by Stuart Kaplan. A beginner may find these verses helpful while interpreting the cards. 

Included with the deck is a handsome 40 page little white book. There is a very insightful, but brief biography of Mlle. Lenormand. It also has card meanings and a sample Grand Tableau reading.

This is a sweet little fortune deck and those that enjoy the classic look should take a look at the Blue Bird Lenormand.

—Terri Clement, ATA Tarot Reflections


Oh, my goodness. These are the Lenormand cards of my dreams! I have been learning Tarot for a while, and in my search for Tarot cards and books, stumbled upon the Lenormand and have been learning that as well. I have perused many decks and bought several, but this is my hands-down favorite deck and my search is over.

To me, everything about this deck is perfect. Even the box is delightful, with its sweet blue bird design. The "Little white book" in this case is a "little blue book" with a lovely picture of three blue birds on it, and inside there are even several pictures: a portrait of Mlle. Lenormand, a photograph of her original mausoleum, and a photograph of her current tomb. The explanations, though necessarily brief, are very good.

The cards are like works of art. First, there is the card image itself, mostly in the style of paintings or drawings but incorporating various kinds of artwork including a Victorian valentine heart for the Heart card and a photograph of a woman's hand wearing a ring for the Ring card. The suits are placed in the upper left corner, instead of in the center as in most cards, leaving more room for the central image, and instead of playing-card-type images of the kings, queens, etc., tiny paintings are used.

The cards have verses on them. I know some people dislike this, but to me as a student they are enormously helpful. They certainly don't detract from the cards at all. Do they contain everything needed to interpret a card? Of course not, but they are very helpful when learning, so that one does not have to constantly refer back to the booklet or other book. The verses on these cards are better written than others I've seen, and do encapsulate quite a bit of the card's meaning.

I just couldn't be happier with my precious little deck!

—“Agent 99”, Amazon customer

$14.00
Barbara Walker Tarot in a Tin
Barbara Walker Tarot in a Tin

What customers are saying about Barbara Walker Tarot:

The Major and Minor Arcana are fully illustrated with rich, colorful designs that were hand painted by Barbara Walker. They are finely detailed and realistic. Some of the figures are partially or completely unclothed. For those who are sensitive to this, there is nothing lewd or gratuitous about these depictions. The suits are Cups, Wands (which are actual wands, not tree branches), Pentacles (which are actual pentacles, not discs or coins) and Swords. Each card is named and the Major Arcana is also numbered. The meaning of each Minor Arcana card is distilled into one key word that is printed above the picture, while its individual designation is printed below.

Barbara Walker's interpretations are rooted in Tantric philosophy; and the pictures illustrate religious ideas from India, through the Middle East and into Europe, as she believes the Tarot cards themselves evolved. There are no images representing African (other than Egyptian), East Asian, Pan-Pacific or Native American cultures. Ms. Walker does not incorporate orthodox Christian beliefs. She explains in her book how the church co-opted many pagan traditions into its dogma (intentionally or otherwise) and some cards may seem to illustrate these beliefs.

Anyone familiar with the Rider-Waite or Marseille Tarot will recognize the symbolism easily, although there are a few exceptions and some subtle changes. Instead of a disembodied hand holding the symbol for the Aces, a full-fledged representation of the Goddess is clearly illustrated. Ms. Walker maintains that the Major Arcana are symbols of initiation into the mysteries of the pre-Christian religions, where the Triple Goddess reigned supreme and reincarnation was accepted. To that end, she removes the more obvious interpretations based on patriarchal bias and restores the original matrifocal intent. The most obvious departure from other decks is the depiction of the court cards. They are Kings, Queens, Princes and Princesses, and they are each given the specific name and image of a God or Goddess that represent the characteristics of that card. The King and Queen and the Prince and Princess are paired according to specific mythologies. For example, the King and Queen of Swords are Indias Yama [godlike authority, powerful judge, discipline and order] and Kali [fatal decisions, swift action, deprivation or widowhood], the Prince and Princess of Cups are Britains Galahad [gallantry, courtesy, capacity for self-sacrifice] and Elaine [mystical insight, hidden knowledge, poetic inspiration]. This is a great help to me in interpreting the court cards, which can be very similar in their traditional representations.

— E. Y. Ivanova, Aeclectic Tarot


The Barbara Walker Tarot belongs to another era and this is probably why it fascinates me and goes unmentioned by others. It is the kind of deck that I like to read with using one card draws; shuffle and think of one aspect of an issue, cut and read the uppermost card. Then ask another question, shuffle, cut, read. I enjoy having conversations like this with a deck.  There are no ambivalent cards in this deck; all the Minor Arcana seem either forceful or diminishing in influence and are quite easy to read as a result (for me anyway) despite the unfamiliar mythological archetypes. The world is full of decks that want to make us feel good about ourselves decks that want to delude us, distract us with their prettiness, give us the answers we secretly think we want. Not this one. The Barbara Walker Tarot is uncompromising in its strangeness. Asking it for answers can feel at first like tapping the hardened, barren, cruel earth for answers. There is something heartless and savage about it on first impressions, but looking at it now makes me reflect on the path tarot has taken over the last 25 years; it has lost some of its weirdness and now tries to manufacture it again with the trend for dark decks, though we need look no further than the Barbara Walker Tarot; they don’t come much darker than this.

—My Curious Cabinet

$18.95