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Fantasy WizardŽ Card Game

Fantasy WizardŽ Card Game
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Based on the bestseller Wizard Card Game where correct predictions earn points, Fantasy Wizard re-imagines Wizard with sensational new characters and settings.

Wizard apprentices develop their powers of premonition by predicting the exact number of tricks they can win in each round of this enchanting card game. Correct predictions earn points. Humans, dwarves, elves, and giants compete for power, but none can conquer the all-powerful Wizards in this dynamic new game of trump. The apprentice with the most points at the end of the game wins. Fantasy Wizard Card Game comes with a full-color deck of character cards, including four Wizard Cards, which always win, and four Jester cards, which always lose. When battling for tricks, these wild cards must be played strategically. Game also comes with custom scorepad, and illustrated instructions. For 3 to 6 players, ages 10 and up.

Fantasy Wizard® Card Game is licensed in Austria, Australia, Belorussia, Canada, China, Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Malaysia, New Zealand, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, and the United States.

Wizard FAQs are available for download here.

Wizard® is also available as: Original Wizard® Card Game, Wizard® Card Game Let's Play Edition, Wizard® Card Game 12-deck Display, Wizard® Card Game Large Index, Canadian Wizard® Card Game, Wizard® Junior Card Game, Wizard® Card Game Deluxe Edition, and Wizard® Medieval Edition.

See also: Wizard® Coins, Wizard® Oversized Scorepads, Wizard® Bidding Wheels, Black Velvet Wizard® Hat, and Deluxe Felt Jester Hat.

Weight 0.40 lbs
ISBN 978-1-57281-655-8
Size Box measures 3.5" x 4.75" ; Cards measure 2.25" x 3.5"
Author Ken Fisher
Artist Franz Vohwinkel


    Fantasy Wizard is a game by Ken Fisher, published by U.S. Games System. On a player’s turn, they will look at their card(s) and try to predict how many tricks they will win that round. It’s best to use some type of marker(s) in front of the player to help remember the prediction number. From here, the first player will play the first card of the first trick. All the other players must play a card of the same color if possible. If they can’t they can play any other card or a trump card. The trump card will win against any other card from different colors. Wizards and Jesters can be played any time and they will always beat a trump card. Jester cards never win a trick. The highest played card will win that trick and will place all the card played in a pile in front of himself. That player will now start the next trick. This continues until all the cards from the player’s hands are gone. This will begin the next round. New cards are drawn based on the number of the round being played. Predictions are made again and play continues. The game ends when the deck of cards has been emptied.


    For this version of the game, there aren’t a lot of components. There is a scorepad that’s nice for keeping track of everything. However the main attraction for this game is the cards. The artwork on them is beautiful. There is such a great fantasy theme feel on each one. The cards are sturdy enough for lots of repeated play. Once again, the production value was very high for this game. I love just looking at the cards. The only real thing that I felt was missing would have been some little plastic markers or cardboard chits of some kind to place in front of each player to keep up with their predictions.

    8 out of 10

    The rulebook is actually more of a rules scroll for this game. It’s very nicely done and explains everything very well. There’s nothing that’s hard to read or understand here. It has a few nice pictures on it and several examples of game play and scoring to help you out. I think it’s also really nice that for non-traditional card game players, it explains terms like tricks and trumps. The scroll is full color and fits in with the theme very well. Very nicely done.
    9 out of 10

    This game is really simple and easy to play. It doesn’t take that long to play either. I like how easy this game can feel more like a take that kind of game. Later on in the game, you can really set it up so that the other player wins or loses those tricks to make them get negative points. In the beginning, I’d say most of the game is based on luck. However the longer you play, the more strategy it takes. I love the simplicity of this game. It’s really a fun game to play
    9 out of 10

    Fantasy Wizard is a light game of predictions and trick taking. The cards are truly amazing to look at. The game is lots of fun. It plays quickly with about a 30-45 minute playtime. Anyone that likes traditional card games like Rummy, Rook or Spades should really enjoy this one. The fantasy theme isn’t really all that deep here. It’s mostly painted on, but that doesn’t really matter to me. I loved looking at the cards as I played. For me, I wouldn’t have enjoyed the game nearly as much without this particular theme included. I definitely recommend giving it a try. I had a lot of fun with it and I’m sure you will too.
    9 out of 10

    —Jonathan Nelsen, Board Game Geek